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  1. #1
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    Potential Ibis owner, HD3 vs Ripley LS

    Just looking for some friendly, knowledgeable advice on a new stablemate for my N3 Nomad.

    Looks like some decent deals on certain Ibis models right now.

    Me: 6'2, 34 inseam, +3 ape index, about 185 before gear. Live/ride in the techy gnar of Phoenix, but do a lot of in-state travel (Sedona, Flag, etc). Pretty experienced rider, much better descender than climber, but I earn all my turns.

    I've owned many nice bikes, but never an Ibis. I absolutely love the Nomad. What I'm looking for in a second bike is something different from the N3, but still very capable and fun. Snappy, shorter wheelbase, less bike than the N3 but still capable of handling our terrain here.

    I've found myself moving away a bit from 29ers recently, though I can't really articulate why.

    I do have a nice Boost 29er build sitting in the garage, so it would be cheaper initially to buy the LS frame. However, BC has an XL HD3 at around $3500 that I could swap some parts around, sell off some stuff and end up around the same price.

    Thoughts?
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  2. #2
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    Why would you buy an HD3 to go along with your Nomad? I think the Ripley would be a perfect compliment... build it up a little bit lighter with a 130mm fork and you've got your bases covered.

    I've ridden the Ripley LS on everything from Moab to Park City and I've got no complaints- it's more than capable of handling any terrain.

    I think the only reason you shouldn't get a Ripley is if you're 100% against buying a 29er... in which case, you should get a Mojo 3 and not the HD3.

  3. #3
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    I don't know. Thus the question. My impression is the HD3 is much less of a gnar-destroyer and more of a long-legged trail bike. Perhaps I'm wrong?

    My issue is I've owned numerous shorter-travel 29er tail bikes ( Following, EX9, Yeti 4.5, Mach 429T, ad nauseum), and none have really met my needs/wants. I really hesitate to buy another and be disappointed.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    I don't know. Thus the question. My impression is the HD3 is much less of a gnar-destroyer and more of a long-legged trail bike. Perhaps I'm wrong?

    My issue is I've owned numerous shorter-travel 29er tail bikes ( Following, EX9, Yeti 4.5, Mach 429T, ad nauseum), and none have really met my needs/wants. I really hesitate to buy another and be disappointed.
    I found the HD3 to be an all-rounder. It was similar to my first gen E29 in that sense, except that it was slower and didn't punish for poor pedaling technique as much.

    I found the Ripley to be a surprisingly playful 29er, despite long chainstays, and a fast descender despite short wheelbase and steep HA. Not sure how it did it... I had a Fox 36 set to 130mm to utilize its capabilities and was riding everything about as hard as I rode my bigger bikes.

    I'd say go with a SC Chameleon to be a stablemate with your N3. It'd accept your 29er boost stuff if you really wanted to change it up...
    We're all on the same ship, and it's sinking.

  5. #5
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    I thought very briefly about another hardtail. I love having one in the garage, but realistically they get about 5% of my ride time given the terrain.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    My issue is I've owned numerous shorter-travel 29er tail bikes ( Following, EX9, Yeti 4.5, Mach 429T, ad nauseum), and none have really met my needs/wants. I really hesitate to buy another and be disappointed.
    Based on that list, the Ripley LS isn't the bike you're looking for. Looks like you want a Nomad Lite, get the HD3.
    Trek Stache 7
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  7. #7
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    Ah, man, I'd put the entire list on here if I weren't scared my wife would see it ...
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  8. #8
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    Sounds like you want the HD3. I think it offers plenty of separation from the nomad3. It's more playful and you'll have fewer pedal strikes. I didn't find the rear suspension to soak up the chunky terrain nearly as well as the nomad, but it's still a very capable bike.


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    I don't know. Thus the question. My impression is the HD3 is much less of a gnar-destroyer and more of a long-legged trail bike. Perhaps I'm wrong?

    My issue is I've owned numerous shorter-travel 29er tail bikes ( Following, EX9, Yeti 4.5, Mach 429T, ad nauseum), and none have really met my needs/wants. I really hesitate to buy another and be disappointed.
    That is the way mine is set up: at 150/150 it is only 10 mm longer legged than my original Mojo Classic. It can be built quite light (Ibis HD3 Final Configuration: 23.3 pounds) and in its current configuration, with Pike Dual 150/120 + revive drop post, it can do just about everything. I am only 160 pounds, I don't ride very aggressively any longer, but I still really enjoy having 150/150 plush with zero loss in the efficiency department thanks to the 5-th generation DW-suspension.

  10. #10
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    Thanks, guys. If I went with the HD3, I'd likely drop the front down to 150.

    I don't think I had a decision already made when posting, but I do know some of the issues I've had with 29ers in the 120-ish travel range. The Phantom is the only one I've owned that's burly enough.

    I think "Nomad Lite" is a pretty apt description of what I'm after.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  11. #11
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    Same height and weight as you, riding in the PNW. I had a similar predicament, I have a Knolly Delirium for the rowdy days and had a Trek Remedy 29er for everything else. I found the Remedy very capable but no fun so I swapped it out for a HD3 and wow, no looking back, most fun bike I've ever owned and it's still fast as f*#k. I think you'll get all the separation you want especially if you build it light.

  12. #12
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    Cool. Assuming you're on an XL and fitment is good?
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  13. #13
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    Yup Xl, fits perfect, better than the Remedy xl that felt too long in the tt

  14. #14
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    One question? Are you wanting to huck drops? If so then get the HD3.

    I went throught the same as you and went with the Ripley LS over the HD3. The Ripley is an awesome bike and rips almost everything....except drops. Other tha that it's agile, rips through the trails, 29r wheels are awesome and it climbs like a 100mm giant anthem.

  15. #15
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    I have been riding an HD3 for the past three seasons and took mine to Sedona and Phoenix (South Mountain) a few times. This is the first bike since my 2006 Turner RFX that I have kept for more than two seasons.

    It's a really great bike for the terrain you have out of your front door but it will overlap quite a bit with the Nomad. Yes, the Nomad has more travel and is a bigger bike but frankly, the HD3 will take you down the exact same trails that you now ride your Nomad on. Not saying that it is a bad thing, but definitely worth considering.

    At your height you may want to think about if the XL is long enough. Some people don't like the shorter wheelbase and cockpit of Ibis bikes (until the HD4). The HD3 is one size bigger than the previous generation HD, but still not as long as the Nomad. If you love the long, low, and slack geometry you may find the HD3 a bit more conventional in this department.

    If you have a chance to drive up to Sedona, Fat Tire bike shop is an incredible Ibis dealer (I just bought a Mojo 3 for my wife from Dave). Dave has high-end demos builds for both the HD3 and the Ripley and rents the bikes out (so you can still take advantage of close-out pricing elsewhere if you so decide). It would be a good way to find what works for you.

  16. #16
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    I just built an HD3 and am really liking it. Normally I would ride a large, but went for an XL on the HD3 and it feels great ( 6ft tall 34" legs ). I was looking at the HD4 but decided the HD3 better fit the style of riding I do. My backup was to put an offset headset on the HD3 if I thought I wanted to give even slacker a go, but so far have no desire to do so. I run a 160mm fork on mine.

    One thing I noticed ( not sure what other makers are doing ), seems Ibis measures seat post angle as the "actual" seat post angle and publishes a rather slack number for the HD3. I think of seat post angle as the center of the post at the seat rails, at normal ride height ( TT reference line ??), to the center of the bottom bracket. On my HD3 that was closer to 73.5* which seems to be more inline with how the bike rides.

  17. #17
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    I have both an HD3 and Ripley V3. The HD3 is more plush on the real rough stuff here in the Colorado front range. It feels like a trail/enduro bike that is still playful.

    The Ripley V3 is faster. Both up and surprisingly down, at least for me. I do have a 140mm fork on it, and downhill-ish tires which make a big difference.

    I enjoy the HD3 on descents for it's playfulness, and the Ripley for it's speed while still being very controlled and smooth.

    I'm 6'2" and on an XL for both.

  18. #18
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    XL HD3 ordered. I like longer-lower-slacker, but wanted something different with a shorter wheelbase and a touch snappier. The N3 is getting a coil and I may consider dropping the front of the Ibis to 150 to further differentiate.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  19. #19
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    Did you actually weigh your bike? When I add up the weight of all my components like you did yours, it gives me 27Lbs. When I actually weigh mine, it comes in at a piggy 32Lbs. Still rides nice, but 5Lbs is a big discrepancy. and I bumped up a lot of the weight and threw in some just in case I missed something.

    Just curious

    Joel

    Quote Originally Posted by Davide View Post
    That is the way mine is set up: at 150/150 it is only 10 mm longer legged than my original Mojo Classic. It can be built quite light (Ibis HD3 Final Configuration: 23.3 pounds) and in its current configuration, with Pike Dual 150/120 + revive drop post, it can do just about everything. I am only 160 pounds, I don't ride very aggressively any longer, but I still really enjoy having 150/150 plush with zero loss in the efficiency department thanks to the 5-th generation DW-suspension.
    Last edited by Joel_l; 08-14-2017 at 05:24 PM.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joel_l View Post
    When I actually weigh mine, it comes in at a piggy 32Lbs.
    It's hard to get a 32lb HD3. Unless you are using 2-ply tires, 6+ oz of sealant per tire, have 1900 gram or so wheelset, and a heavy fork. Is that your setup? If not you may want to check your scale as it might be off.

  21. #21
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    I only have a shitty set of fishing scales but mine comes in at 31lbs with carbon bar, carbon 38mm rims, xt drivetrain, float x2 and a fox 36. 23-24 lbs seems unrealistic or you are trying to make this bike something it isnt. You need to build it to take abuse around these parts.

  22. #22
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    I do have some heavier items like the 160mm TALAS, and the WTB Convicts are heavy, but nothing that is 8 Lbs heavier than the 24 lb bike. When I add everything up I get about 27 lbs as equipped. I don't think my scale is that far off, especially because it is a me vs me plus bike weight difference.

    Quote Originally Posted by ShredlyMcShredface View Post
    It's hard to get a 32lb HD3. Unless you are using 2-ply tires, 6+ oz of sealant per tire, have 1900 gram or so wheelset, and a heavy fork. Is that your setup? If not you may want to check your scale as it might be off.

  23. #23
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    I demo'd and weighed a HD3 today. It was the XT build, large, Ibis 738 aluminum wheels, X2 shock, fox 36. It weighed 30.7 lbs. Great bike. I am considering purchasing to compliment my Ripley OG V2...which I think is a great bike and don't plan on parting with.

    Truthfully, it didn't give up much to the Ripley and I feel it equalled the Ripley in many aspects on my local trails. Of course there were a few areas where the Ripley outshined.

  24. #24
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    Last couple of posts make me think 32lbs-ish for my HD3 is not out of line. In the end doesn't matter, rides great.

  25. #25
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    Got it built up last night and just took a spin around the block. Sizing seems spot on and the bike feels incredibly light. Can't wait for a trail ride.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  26. #26
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    You'll love it. What's your build? I find myself going much faster on my HD3. Even though I think mines heavy, it doesnt feel like it.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    Got it built up last night
    Can you describe the ports on your HD3 for the rear derailleur cable?

    I'm in the middle of building up an HD3 right now, and the port on the left side near the head tube has one big hole, i.e. for housing, but the exit port on the right side of the lower down tube has two cable stops. I think I either need to buy a single cable stop port for the left side near the head tube or drill out one of the cable stops on the double cable stop port on the right side of the lower down tube so that it can accommodate housing. And to run full housing all the way to the rear derailleur, I would have to also drill out the 2 single cable stop ports on the seat stay.

    I do not understand why the port on the left side near the head tube is not a cable stop. It seems to me that the holes for the rear derailleur cable all need to be housing holes, or they all need to be cable stops. They can't be a mix and match of both types.

    Also, I cannot seem to deflate the DPS shock enough to measure the chain length. It's pretty soft now, and I did several rounds of cycling the shock 20 times, and no more air comes out, but the shock still wants to extend rather than remain compressed.
    Last edited by happyriding; 08-17-2017 at 07:34 AM.

  28. #28
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    Hi,

    I just put a convoluted reply in your original thread. Short answer, your thinking is correct. I ended up drilling all of them out and ran all my housings full length.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joel_l View Post
    I do have some heavier items like the 160mm TALAS, and the WTB Convicts are heavy, but nothing that is 8 Lbs heavier than the 24 lb bike. When I add everything up I get about 27 lbs as equipped. I don't think my scale is that far off, especially because it is a me vs me plus bike weight difference.
    Your math must be off, as I bet your scale is right. Convicts are 1200 gram tires. There's no way the math adds up to 27 lbs with Convicts and a Talas. 32 lbs sounds about right. The basic build for me with a Pike (3/4 pound lighter than a Talas), and 800 gram tires (another 2 lbs lighter), is 28.5 lbs

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    I would have to also drill out the 2 single cable stop ports on the seat stay.
    Yes you need to drill them out, just a few seconds to do so. But full length housing is so much better. Just remember to put the screw in the port before pushing the housing through. Total pain in the *ss to get the screw in when the housing is already through.

  31. #31
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    Total pain in the *ss to get the screw in when the housing is already through.
    Thanks. I've been struggling with that.

  32. #32
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    I don't think I forgot anything. I know I have over a pound extra in those Convicts. I just ordered 2 High Roller II 2.8s which will actually be 1.1 pounds lighter for the pair. I could be off some on the frame and the forks, but I doubt 5 lbs. Maybe I'll re-tally everything some time. In the end, I don't really notice, the bike rides great. It's more a curiosity.

    Quote Originally Posted by ShredlyMcShredface View Post
    Your math must be off, as I bet your scale is right. Convicts are 1200 gram tires. There's no way the math adds up to 27 lbs with Convicts and a Talas. 32 lbs sounds about right. The basic build for me with a Pike (3/4 pound lighter than a Talas), and 800 gram tires (another 2 lbs lighter), is 28.5 lbs

  33. #33
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    So I redid my parts list and come up with just over 29 pounds. not knowing the exact XL frame weight, close enough. Having a great time on the bike.

    HD3 XL 2950
    Talas 160 2200
    DBA IL 397
    CB Iodine3 1760
    Seatpost 560
    seat 305
    FD 118
    RD 221
    F shifter 102
    R shifter 102
    Front brake 277
    Rear brake 277
    2 x rotors 268
    F convict 1239
    R convict 1239
    sealant 227
    chain 253
    XTR 2x cranks 630
    BB 89
    pedals 408
    bars 220
    stem 145
    extra 250
    14237 31.3
    Last edited by Joel_l; 08-19-2017 at 09:46 AM.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joel_l View Post
    So I redid my parts list and come up with just over 29 pounds. not knowing the exact XL frame weight, close enough. Having a great time on the bike.

    bars 220
    stem 145
    Your stem and bar numbers are a bit light, unless you have very light stuff.

    Also it's hard to pedal your bike without cranks and a bottom bracket, even if you have pedals.

    And your brakes won't stop for sh*t without rotors

    You're welcome.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShredlyMcShredface View Post
    Your stem and bar numbers are a bit light, unless you have very light stuff.
    Typical carbon bar and trail stem numbers.
    Trek Stache 7
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  36. #36
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    Dang, I thought it rode funny LOL. I updated the numbers, now it's right in there with what I weigh it at. I did replace my Convicts with some High Roller 2.8s. Rides nice and now weighs in at 30Lbs even.

    Quote Originally Posted by ShredlyMcShredface View Post
    Your stem and bar numbers are a bit light, unless you have very light stuff.

    Also it's hard to pedal your bike without cranks and a bottom bracket, even if you have pedals.

    And your brakes won't stop for sh*t without rotors

    You're welcome.

  37. #37
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    Hows the HD3 on the trail?

    I was gonna say mojo 3 as I recently took a spin on a friends and it felt like a fantastic trail bike. He was running plus and the bike was surprisingly fast and nimble. Seemed to handle tech riding fine as well.
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  38. #38
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    27.2 lbs with pedals on new Park Tool digital bike scale

    Large Mojo HD3 Boost with fox evol (Monarch Plus Debon Air coming)
    Pike 160mm
    Next 35mm bar
    Turbine 50mm 35 stem
    Ibis 735 Boost carbon wheels with i9 hubs
    Nobby nic 2.6 tires (perfect size)
    Turbine 125 dropper
    Next 175 crank
    XT Shifter, RD, 46 Cassette
    XT brakes
    Crank Brothers Egg Beaters


    Fantastic Bike and I would highly recommend it for the everyday trail rider that gets aggressive occasionally or all the time because of its versatility. I was pleasantly surprised by how well it pedals and even more surprised how well it climbed. I own both Ripley LS and Mojo HD3; I personally think they are the perfect bike combo.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Potential Ibis owner, HD3 vs Ripley LS-ripley.jpg  

    Potential Ibis owner, HD3 vs Ripley LS-mojo.jpg  


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