Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 79
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,905

    Pics of the Bashguard and Guide I just installed

    Probably not a whole lot of Ibis riders who care but here's a few pics of the Bash Guard and Chain Guide I just installed today.

    After reading feedback from a post that I made earlier this week here and consulting with my friend I decided to upgrade from a standard Triple Ring setup to a Bashguard, 2 ring setup with a chain guide.

    I didn't want to ad a bunch of weight or spend a lot of money so f I got a Shimano Saint bashguard and bolt kit for $25. Actually weighs slightly less than the XTR big ring. The guard was 72 grams and the XTR big ring was 82. For now I'm keeping the stock 22/32 gearing and will see how that works out, I might want to try the XTR 34 tooth middle ring next instead of the 32 though as I'm worried I'll be running out of gear n the DH.

    I then added a $25 Blackspire Stinger Chain guide, which basically just sandwiches between the BB cup and the frame. I also upgraded the pulley to a MRP lightweight pully which is supposed to save some weight and make the wheel quiter.

    I haven't had it out on the trail yet since we're in the middle of a storm but here's a few pics. I'm hoping my chain doesn't fall off as much and to reduce chain slap







    and while I'm at it I weighed the bike, still under 28 pounds, came right in at 27.92 and I hope to drop a lil more when I get the150 talas qr15

    Last edited by Yody; 01-23-2010 at 11:04 PM.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    2,440
    sweet set-up!

    looks like you need the HD!

    the bash guard looks burly...it is less than a triple ring?

    are you happy you got the white bike? I am debating over white or black for my frame I am about to order.

    thanks

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,275
    Nice lookin SL Yody.Seems like your trying to keep the weight down, so I was wondering why you didn't mount the $12.00, guaranteed for life, 52 gram BBG guard?

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,905
    Bashguard is plastic and yeah it weighs 12 grams less than the big ring, its pretty light.

    I'm happy with the white bike, it looks really nice, I wouldn't buy another white bike though, it just starts to look like **** if you don't keep it up which means a lot of washing and cleaning. I really wanted the matte black but ended up with a white because I had to have now.

    I'd love to have a HD but honestly I think once I get this 150 fork on this bike its going to be a real traill killer. I think once you start getting past 140 mm of rear travel bikes start to lose that playful feel. I could see one down the road but for now I'm stilll having fun on this bike

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,905
    Quote Originally Posted by xc71
    Nice lookin SL Yody.Seems like your trying to keep the weight down, so I was wondering why you didn't mount the $12.00, guaranteed for life, 52 gram BBG guard?
    Well this guard was really only $10 turned out I had to order the Saint bolt kit to work with it which was the additional $14.

    I'm not a real bigtime weight watcher, but I do check stuff out for the hell of it and try to reduce weight where possible, its not really a huge concern though. And I liked the look of the Saint guard as it matches the cranks nicely

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,905
    nevermind
    Last edited by Yody; 01-23-2010 at 11:07 PM.

  7. #7
    boardguru
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    138
    looks good

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Trailblazer7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    45
    Yody .. this looks pretty much the set up I'm looking for to add to my Mojo I also have XTR cranks but was never quite sure what I needed .. you say the bashguard is plastic ?? have you hit any big rocks with it yet ?? also I'm not very good at the mechanic's and would probably ask my LBS to carry out the work if I purchased the parts.
    Do you feel a difference with the chainstay guide ?
    Four Wheels move the body Two wheels move the soul.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: c-wal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    282
    I'm currently running the same setup. I've actually had the bash guard for a few years and it hasn't broken yet. The only issue I have with the guide is it moves into the chainstay when it gets bumped/hit going over logs, rocks, etc... The damage from the guide is minimal; however, when the guide is up against the stay the chain starts wearing into the carbon when in the granny. One way around this is to getter a bigger bash guard.
    I have a DRS w/36T bash on the way, so hopefully that helps some.
    Finding out that the HD did not have ISCG mounts was disappointing...

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: c-wal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    282
    Out of curiosity why go with the talas 150 vs. the float 150? The a-c height change is minimal based on Ibis specs and you may save a bit more weight (i have no idea what they weigh).
    I'm running a talas 36 and notice that unless I change the shock setup it feels like it is more difficult to pedal when I drop the travel to 130. My guess was that the weight shift on the rear suspension was causing the problem, so to test I ran more sag in the rear while the fork was at 130 which seemed to fix it. That may have been why I felt the need to run more air in the RP23 with the fork at 160. At this point the only time I lower the fork is so that it fits in the car.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,905
    I sometimes come across real steep climbs, or long climbs where the lower travel settings make it easier for me as the bars aren't so high and I don't have to spend as much energy worrying about the front wheel coming up, also on realy techy stuff its nice to have it low on occasion. I've just become used to it and like it, I could probably live without it, if my wheels took a 20mm TA I'd be on a revelation 150

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,905
    Took the bike out for its first ride since the guide/bash install. Its been storming bad here for the past few weeks so only limited time riding. Was a total mud bath though, probably one of the top muddiest rides Ive ever done. Anyway..... OMG cant believe I waited so long to dod this. There really are no words to describe the way it feels to climb and descend with no chain slap, clatter, or noise. To me it is well worth the added drag that the pulley puts on the drivetrain.

    Speaking of, if I crank the pulley up high enough to put it where it needs to be to properly tension the chain correctly it does put a reasonable amount of drag on the pedals. . Its okay though because it wasn't all that noticable pedaling and the fact that I no longer hear the chain rattling around is worth it x 10
    Last edited by Yody; 01-28-2010 at 09:02 AM.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,905
    Also just as a note to anyone else considering going with this setup, I raised the pulley farther up than whats int the pics. The chain was not tensioned enough with the pulley that low. Its tricky though because as soon as you properly tension the chain you can feel the resistance in the pedals. They no longer spin freely. So in my head I wanted to leave the tension looser but really that defeats the purpose of a chain guide right? I raised the stinger all the way up only leaving maybe a 1/4" gap between the Stinger bracket and the botom of the rear triangle. Luckily I already had apatch of rubber glued to the bottom of the rear triangle for previous chain slap so if the stinger does get bumped up from a log or something hopefully it doesn't dig into the carbon.

  14. #14
    Fragglepuss The Chaste
    Reputation: slcrockymountainrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,264
    Problem I ran into with a BS Stinger on my Mojo was that it increased the frequency of chain suck, which really sucked (pun intended).
    Gotta watch that as when you get chainsuck with that guide it can chew through that little metal/plastique (that's french) chainstay carbon guard as it just forces the chain up into the 'sucked' position a lot tighter. That's what she said.

    But keeping the chain slap noise down and damage to the rest of the chainstay was worth it IMO, despite a small weight penalty.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,905
    I've done two really muddy rides, like really really muddy and the shifting actually seems better now and the chain suck has gone away? Also I already jbwelded that stupid chrome guard back on after it kept falling offf, that sucker isn't going anywhere now

    The ONLY negative to this setup I"ve found so far is the fact that you are decreasing the pedaling efficiency by putting drag on the chain. But for me, its sooooo worth it to not drop the chain anymore and quiet down the system. The 90 grams or so I don't mind one bit

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,905
    I've done two really muddy rides, like really really muddy and the shifting actually seems better now and the chain suck has gone away? Also I already jbwelded that stupid chrome guard back on after it kept falling offf, that sucker isn't going anywhere now

    The ONLY negative to this setup I"ve found so far is the fact that you are decreasing the pedaling efficiency by putting drag on the chain. But for me, its sooooo worth it to not drop the chain anymore and quiet down the system. The 90 grams or so I don't mind one bit

  17. #17
    _dw
    _dw is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,270
    With the roller being so low on your guide I don't think that it will be doing much for you in the middle ring at sag. The chain won't be touching the roller very often. You can forget about it being effective in the granny gear. The chain won't touch the roller at all.
    dw★link
    Split Pivot
    @daveweagle -Twitter

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GuruAtma's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3,435
    Quote Originally Posted by _dw
    With the roller being so low on your guide I don't think that it will be doing much for you in the middle ring at sag. The chain won't be touching the roller very often. You can forget about it being effective in the granny gear. The chain won't touch the roller at all.
    Forgive my ignorance of chain guides, but would you really need it when you're in the granny gear? I figure the time you'd be bumping along at high speeds is when you're in the middle ring.

    I've still got the big ring on my bike, but I pretty much only use it to take up the slack in the chain when I'm going down hill to avoid chain slap.

    I think having a quieter bike when descending makes a big difference. It makes you feel faster and more confident when it doesn't sound like your bike is about to fall apart.
    我的镀铬光泽的冰柱一样,我骑在镇附近在我的低骑手自行车

  19. #19
    aka dan51
    Reputation: d-bug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    5,657
    Quote Originally Posted by GuruAtma
    Forgive my ignorance of chain guides, but would you really need it when you're in the granny gear? I figure the time you'd be bumping along at high speeds is when you're in the middle ring.

    I've still got the big ring on my bike, but I pretty much only use it to take up the slack in the chain when I'm going down hill to avoid chain slap.

    I think having a quieter bike when descending makes a big difference. It makes you feel faster and more confident when it doesn't sound like your bike is about to fall apart.
    The biggest advantage of the guide, IMO, is when going over bumpy stuff it acts as a chain damper and reduces chain slack going up the front of the rings.
    Here's what I mean:
    1. hit a bump, and the rear der arm moves up towards the chainstay.
    2. this causes the chain to get loose and kind of creates a chain wave heading towards the chainrings.
    3a. without the lower roller, that wave can continue around the rings and you risk dropping the chain off the rings.
    3b. with the roller it eliminates the chain wave where the roller is, and reduces the chance of dropping the chain. Since less of the chain can flap around, you then get smaller waves, helping to reduce the chain from slapping on the chainstay, thus reducing the noise.
    It's like building a reef around a beach. You end up with a nice quiet/calm beach by controlling the waves.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    ...People thought they were getting a good fork because it was a "fox".

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,905
    Quote Originally Posted by _dw
    With the roller being so low on your guide I don't think that it will be doing much for you in the middle ring at sag. The chain won't be touching the roller very often. You can forget about it being effective in the granny gear. The chain won't touch the roller at all.

    Sorry you must of missed the post right above where I describe that since those pictures were taken I had raised the pulley, hadn't ever ridden at the time those original pics were taken. However I do appreciate the advice as if anyone else looks at this post, I think its important for them to find out like I did, that there is no point in running a chain guide if you don't properly tension the chain.

    Quote Originally Posted by _Yody
    Also just as a note to anyone else considering going with this setup, I raised the pulley farther up than whats int the pics. The chain was not tensioned enough with the pulley that low.
    In these pics you can see where the roller sits now, and how that is as high as the roller can go before creating too tight clearance between the lower part of the rear triangle and the bracket for the Stinger. In this position so far the guide has been working very very well.




  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,905
    Quote Originally Posted by GuruAtma
    Forgive my ignorance of chain guides, but would you really need it when you're in the granny gear? I figure the time you'd be bumping along at high speeds is when you're in the middle ring.

    I've still got the big ring on my bike, but I pretty much only use it to take up the slack in the chain when I'm going down hill to avoid chain slap.

    I think having a quieter bike when descending makes a big difference. It makes you feel faster and more confident when it doesn't sound like your bike is about to fall apart.
    You're totally right and on point. What DW was saying though, was that in the original pics the roller is not high enough to take enough slack out of the system to make the guide worth it, you will see in many peoples pictures, a chain guide that does not take enough slack out making it nearly useless. They probably have theirs setup like this for the same reason I did at first which was that when you crank up the pulley it really creates a drag on the pedals which probably scares some people. For me its just something to get used to and the small inefficiency in pedaling is a small sacrifice to have a quiet drivetrain over rough terrain

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GuruAtma's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3,435
    so if you're just having 2 rings in front, would you shorten the chain and use a med. cage derailleur? And wouldn't this also reduce a lot of chain slack/slap even without a chain guide? Though I'm sure the guide does it even more
    我的镀铬光泽的冰柱一样,我骑在镇附近在我的低骑手自行车

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,905
    Quote Originally Posted by GuruAtma
    so if you're just having 2 rings in front, would you shorten the chain and use a med. cage derailleur? And wouldn't this also reduce a lot of chain slack/slap even without a chain guide? Though I'm sure the guide does it even more
    Yes to all above, except I'd doubt if it would reduce chain slap nearly as much as adding a guide

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dictatorsaurus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    2,539
    How many links did you remove from the chain when you installed the bash guard and stinger

  25. #25
    aka dan51
    Reputation: d-bug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    5,657
    Yody, I think what _dw is saying is the the roller is still pretty fr away from the frame, even in your later pictures. On mine the chin barely misses the frame. I have mine as far up as possible. I'll post pics later.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    ...People thought they were getting a good fork because it was a "fox".

Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •