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  1. #1
    The Crow
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    One for the experts (Hans, Mr DW and the likes)

    What happens with the steering angle when going through the "range" when you have an angleset on your bike? Std headset is "flat" all around so turning the handlebar should have a smooth "transition", but with a angleset being slacker in front back to "std" does this mean steering will "speed up"?

    Sorry for all the " "'s, but it's a bit difficult to ask when we're not all standing next to our bikes.
    There's a feeling I get
    When I look to the West
    And my spirit is crying for leaving

  2. #2
    www.derbyrims.com
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    Here's my understanding of your question.

    Slackening the effective head angle, increases steering-trail (the distance the tire contact patch is behind the steering axis). Increased steering-trail slows steering response, the same turn of the handlebar turns the bike less.

    Also slacker effective head angle increases the "flop" of the front wheel. Not a problem at faster speeds, but the difference in flop or heavier steering feeling, and the slower steering, is noticeable at very slow speeds such as while climbing.

    The opposite effects happen when going from slacker effective head angle to a steeper angle.

    There is a section in Motorcycle Handling and Chassis Design, by Tony Foale that explains this and more with illustrations about bike steering effects. Do a google search for this book or author, the steering section may be one of many that are available to see as a samples of this book on-line. This is a very thorough book on all aspects of the geometry of bike handling.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
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    "Std headset is "flat" all around so turning the handlebar should have a smooth "transition", but with a angleset being slacker in front back to "std" does this mean steering will "speed up"?"

    It's exactly the same from a steering standpoint but the angle set equipped bike would have a little lower front end than if it were designed from the start to have that head angle. In practice, that might mean that you run the stem a little higher to compensate if you want to preserve the height of the bars dimension.

    H
    Hans
    Ibis Cycles, Inc.

  4. #4
    The Crow
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    Thanks Hans. Bu the way, some high praise from Scot going your way in the first edition of Switchback Mag.
    There's a feeling I get
    When I look to the West
    And my spirit is crying for leaving

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