Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 34
  1. #1
    flow where ever you go
    Reputation: noshortcuts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,509

    One carbon beauty of a Mojo coming together...

    Finally!
    mojo coming along 1.jpg

    mojo coming along 2.jpg
    The Ibis Wait:
    Date Ordered: June 2006.
    Original estimated delivery date: August 2006, then each (painfully long) month after.
    Delivery date: November 2006.

    Hardest decisions:
    1. Front fork. Besides hella expensive, my first impressions are smooth (like butter), stylish and strong.
    2. Frame size. So far the small feels great. I calculated that a 110mm stem and a setback seat should give an excellent reach and they do. I will need some long rides to make sure my weight is in the sweet spot or if any adjustments could make it better.

    Build surprises:
    1. Rear brake mounts were too tall to fit Magura Marta SL brake. Some easy filing on the forward hole/mount and a washer between the frame and the brake was the easy solution.

    Left to do:
    1. Cut down the handlebar a bit.
    2. Slide on some grips.
    3. Final cut on the steer tube.
    4. Slap on a new (now delayed) wheel build (currently built with a set off another bike of mine to get me rolling).
    5. Take a final weight for fun.
    6. Ride the hell out of it.
    7. Share ride impressions, especially of the bike and the fork.

    Second thoughts:
    Had I known the wait would would put me into winter, I think I would have gone for a painted frame. That's the only way I can imagine my black, carbon, and silver build bits showing off the bike any better.
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 01-22-2007 at 08:00 AM.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    421
    It looks Stealthy. One sweet looking ride!

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    113
    Congrats NS! Very, very sweet build. The fork looks awesome....if it rides half as good as it looks, you're in great shape. Your 'It was definitely worth the wait' post-ride posts will be following shortly!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: miles wadsworth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    577
    what kind of fork is that? is it carbon?

  5. #5
    flow where ever you go
    Reputation: noshortcuts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,509

    About that carbon fork:

    Quote Originally Posted by miles wadsworth
    what kind of fork is that? is it carbon?
    Pace RC41 Fighter. 150mm. It is carbon. 3.83 lbs confirmed including thru-axle.
    In the USA it is distributed through QBP. DT Swiss has just bought out the fork division of PACE, so I think the price will come down and they will be more available in the next year or two. We'll see. In the USA they are warranty / serviced by QBP in Minnesota and Garageworks in California. They get great reviews for performance and mixed reviews for reliability.
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 11-23-2006 at 09:27 PM.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: miles wadsworth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    577
    your bike looks sweet.cant wait for a review.i got my mojo last thursday,have not been in dirt yet. demo forest on sat. so excited.

  7. #7
    Trail Rider
    Reputation: Quattro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    915

    Beautiful frame!

    Very nice looking bike. I'm about your size and had a question. You went with a small with a laid back seat post. Did you pick small because of the stand over height? I was wondering if a medium with straight post would have worked? I have a 30 in. inseam and don't need much clearance.
    [size=4]Don[/size]

  8. #8
    flow where ever you go
    Reputation: noshortcuts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,509

    SIZING - SMALL FRAME, "medium" person.

    Quote Originally Posted by Quattro
    Very nice looking bike. I'm about your size and had a question. You went with a small with a laid back seat post. Did you pick small because of the stand over height? I was wondering if a medium with straight post would have worked? I have a 30 in. inseam and don't need much clearance.
    You probably already saw the pained thinking I did concerning size here: Mojo fram e sizes...

    I closely considered the geometry (effective top tube mostly, but also headset height, chainstay lengh, wheelbase, etc.) of the small and medium and it seemed each was just a bit over or under "ideal". I based "ideal" on a Blur LT that fits me well. I decided that either Mojo would likely feel good but overall a bit smaller would be preferable to a bit bigger.

    The setback post and 110mm stem give the same reach as the Blur LT medium. I don't have the seat very far back, so a straight post with the seat back is probably about the same. The stem could go 10mm in either direction and still be comfortable I think.

    So far, not once has it felt that bigger would have been better. Switchbacks, steep ups, steep downs, and small jumps are all stable, balanced, and comfortable. This small bike is easier to wheelie and much easier to trackstand than the med. Blur. The only way to be sold on a medium now would be to do a direct comparison. If your inseam is 30in., you may have a taller torso and then a medium may fit easier for you, I don't know.

    Medium people on small Mojos will need a long seatpost of at least 380mm because the small's seat-tube is a short 15.5".
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 11-23-2006 at 08:55 PM. Reason: add title

  9. #9
    Trail Rider
    Reputation: Quattro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    915

    Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    You probably already saw the pained thinking I did concerning size here: Mojo fram e sizes...

    I closely considered the geometry (effective top tube mostly, but also headset height, chainstay lengh, wheelbase, etc.) of the small and medium and it seemed each was just a bit over or under "ideal". I based "ideal" on a Blur LT that fits me well. I decided that either Mojo would likely feel good but overall a bit smaller would be preferable to a bit bigger.

    The setback post and 110mm stem give the same reach as the Blur LT medium. I don't have the seat very far back, so a straight post with the seat back is probably about the same. The stem could go 10mm in either direction and still be comfortable I think.

    I've only had one good ride on the Mojo and did not once feel that bigger would have been better. Switchbacks, steep ups, steep downs, and small jumps were all stable and comfortable. The only way to be sold on a medium now would be to do a direct comparison. If your inseam is 30in., you may have a taller torso and then a medium may fit easier for you, I don't know.
    I fit a med Blur also and it felt about the same as my small Tracer with a straight handlebar. Thank you again.
    [size=4]Don[/size]

  10. #10
    flow where ever you go
    Reputation: noshortcuts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,509

    Muddy Mojo

    finishing touches mojo.JPG

    Getting finishing touches.

    Cleaned up and ready to roll... some more.

    clean fall mojo.JPG
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 11-18-2006 at 10:19 PM.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,974
    Will you be shortening your front brake hose?

  12. #12
    flow where ever you go
    Reputation: noshortcuts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,509

    Yea

    Quote Originally Posted by danK
    Will you be shortening your front brake hose?
    Left to do:
    1. Shorten front brake hose.
    2. Install new wheels (when they come) with Magura discs, XTR 11-34 cassette, and Stans tubeless kit.
    3. Cut off the bottom-pull part of the XTR front derailleur. It is not needed and just gets in the way of cleaning the lower seat tube and lower pivot area below it.
    4. Devise a mud guard for the rear tire down to the lower pivot area below the front derailleur.


    Recently finished:
    1. Put 2" wide outdoor grade polyurethane tape in various areas to protect frame from car rack, dirt, cable rub, ...
    2. Cut Salsa handlebar (1"total).
    3. Cut more off steer tube but left enough for a 10mm spacer above the stem. I will likely cut it again later to install the Thomson stem flush with no extra spacer.
    4. Wrapped teflon tape under brake mounts on handlebar. This is so they will turn instead of break in a crash. New carbon levers cost are WAY overpriced.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,974
    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    Pace RC40 Fighter. 150mm. It is carbon. 3.83 lbs confirmed including thru-axle.
    In the USA it is distributed through QBP. DT Swiss has just bought out the fork division of PACE, so I think the price will come down and they will be more available in the next year or two. We'll see. In the USA they are warranty / serviced by QBP in Minnesota and Garageworks in California. They get great reviews for performance and mixed reviews for reliability.
    Is that a Maxle type release or is it a pain in the butt bolt type of deal?

  14. #14
    flow where ever you go
    Reputation: noshortcuts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,509

    Pace Fork: about the tru-axle mechanism

    Quote Originally Posted by danK
    Is that a Maxle type release or is it a pain in the butt bolt type of deal?
    It is neither. Besides needing an allen wrench which is always with me anyway, it is just as much or little trouble and time consuming as fitting my Pike with maxle.

    It fixes easily and quickly with a few turns each of three 5mm allen bolts.

    First you push the axle through the fork and wheel as normal, then turn an allen on the right side to draw the bolt through the rest of the way. Then tightnen the two clamping allen bolts. It's only a few turns each and all self aligning due to the "unique twin axle design where sub-axle (fixed into right-hand fork leg) can float from side to side".

    I can make a picture if you like.

    By the way, the fork has been brilliant in every way. Now if it remains dependable, I will know it was worth the money and will easily have a bright future in the USA once DTswiss marketing and manufacuring take over.
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 11-19-2006 at 06:59 PM.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,974
    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    It is neither. Besides needing an allen wrench which is always with me anyway, it is just as much or little trouble and time consuming as fitting my Pike with maxle.

    It fixes easily and quickly with a few turns each of three 5mm allen bolts.

    First you push the axle through the fork and wheel as normal, then turn an allen on the right side to draw the bolt through the rest of the way. Then tightnen the two clamping allen bolts. It's only a few turns each and all self aligning due to the "unique twin axle design where sub-axle (fixed into right-hand fork leg) can float from side to side".

    I can make a picture if you like.

    By the way, the fork has been brilliant in every way. Now if it remains dependable, I will know it was worth the money and will easily have a bright future in the USA once DTswiss marketing and manufacuring take over.
    Still sounds more of a hassle than the Pike. Maxle = unscrew and pull out. Jam back in and tighten. The need for an allen is just one more thing to go find and pull out of the Camelbak and put away. Obviously this is not a life crisis but I can't imagine how it's just as easy as a Maxle. Then again I've never even touched your fork.

    What is the axle to crown of yours?
    What is the current best price you've seen?

  16. #16
    flow where ever you go
    Reputation: noshortcuts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,509

    Axle to crown on Pace Fighter

    Quote Originally Posted by danK
    Still sounds more of a hassle than the Pike. Maxle = unscrew and pull out. Jam back in and tighten. The need for an allen is just one more thing to go find and pull out of the Camelbak and put away. Obviously this is not a life crisis but I can't imagine how it's just as easy as a Maxle. Then again I've never even touched your fork.

    What is the axle to crown of yours?
    What is the current best price you've seen?
    Yes you have to pull out and put back your allen. But the bolts turn little and quickly which feels as if it matches or bests the time and effort with my maxle (save getting out the allen). Anyway, having both, even if it does actually take longer, I don't miss the maxle. Maybe you would.

    I've seen axle to crown listed as 524mm. Have not checked mine.

    I don't check prices but it is at Universal for 960 (with ongoing 15% discount).

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,974
    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    Yes you have to pull out and put back your allen. But the bolts turn little and quickly which feels as if it matches or bests the time and effort with my maxle (save getting out the allen). Anyway, having both, even if it does actually take longer, I don't miss the maxle. Maybe you would.

    I've seen axle to crown listed as 524mm. Have not checked mine.

    I don't check prices but it is at Universal for 960 (with ongoing 15% discount).
    $960 with discount????
    Keep us up to date on the performance and durability.

  18. #18
    flow where ever you go
    Reputation: noshortcuts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,509

    Initial Pace Fighter ride review

    Quote Originally Posted by danK
    $960 with discount????
    Keep us up to date on the performance and durability.
    Pace RC41 Fighter. 150mm. All carbon lowers. 3.83 lbs confirmed including thru-axle.
    Based on 1/2 dozen good rides on the PACE Fighter 150mm fork, I am blown away.
    1. It is extremely easy to set up. All external adjusments. They include Rebound Damping, Compression Damping, Launch-Control, launch-Control Threshold, and Air Pressure.
    2. It is very very active and plush. More than Minutes or Pike air.
    3. It uses every bit of it's travel. I know this for sure after diving / falling off a bridge and landing front wheel first. I thought I would be ejected over the bars because of how severe the nosedive was. I could feel the suspension carefully and solidly absorb the impact. By the time the travel was used up, the rear of the bike was coming to the ground instead of over the top as I expected. The o-ring for measuring travel was topped out and all was in good shape.
    4. The lockdown (Launch-Control) improves the steeps and turns itself off when full travel is needed. I have tried some steep climbs where my Blur LT would get light in the front end if I did not reduce travel or really weight the front myself. With the Mojo, these same steeps cause only a little bit of lightness and NO wandering of the front wheel, even with the 150mm fork. However, this fork's "lockout' with "launch control" does improve even this. What Pace calls lockout is really "lock-down" (up to 90mm reduced travel) with active reserve travel (of at least 50mm) and the launch control is a speed-bump sensitive release for the lock down. On those same climbs where the front gets a bit light, I have repeated the climb with the fork locked-down (shortened fork / reduced travel) and the rear digs in like mad while the front remains glued down. This combination allows a greater range of effective climbing speed, cadence, and riding posture. I also expect that it will greatly enhance climbing muddy hills because this is where I noticed the greatest climbing improvements of a shortened fork on the Blur.
    5. The fork is extremely stiff and tracks as well (excellently) as the Mojo frame and rear end whether going slow, fast, steep up, steep down, through rocks and ruts, or jumping.


    The Launch Control is brilliant, but the button for Launch Control / lockdown has pros and cons.
    Pros:
    • It is easy to engage by slapping it down.
    • It is even easier to disengage. Set the treshold to disengage itself by a change in terrain or you can disengage yourself by bouncing the front end or by simply lifting up the switch.
    • The threshold can be adjusted (like Fox's platform) for how easy or hard a hit it takes to disengage.

    Cons:
    • It would be even easier to engage with a remote switch like Pace uses on it's racing fork.
    • The same control you depress to engage Launch Control is also the one you turn to adjust rebound. Since there are not postitve stops on the rebound control, you can accidently turn the rebound while depressing or lifting the Launch Control if your not mindful.

    So far, the best fork I've ever ridden. Comparing mostly to Minutes and Pikes. It is lighter than a Minute yet has the plushness, strength, thru-axle, and adjustability of a Pike, plus more travel and Launch-Control / lockdown. I hope it holds up.
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 11-23-2006 at 09:27 PM.

  19. #19
    flow where ever you go
    Reputation: noshortcuts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,509

    Make your own mud-guard for the lower pivot

    mojo mud guard.JPG
    This prototype, that is working excellently, was cut from a lightweight plastic "rear deflector shield" from Mountain Cycling Accessories that cost $5 at REI. Later I will cut a new one from a plain black area of the same plastic deflector shield. I put a piece of 2" x 2" protective tape under the bottom half so it does not scratch the clear coat.

    With an XTR front derailleur you must make it clear the round pivot on the right. With X.0, you can leave it wider on the right.

    Works great and since it is small, black, and tucked away, it is not even seen.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 01-16-2007 at 10:19 AM.

  20. #20
    Mojo0115
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,667

    noshortcuts - which pace fighter?

    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    Pace RC41 Fighter. 150mm. All carbon lowers. 3.83 lbs confirmed including thru-axle.
    Based on 1/2 dozen good rides on the PACE Fighter 150mm fork, I am blown away.
    1. It is extremely easy to set up. All external adjusments. They include Rebound Damping, Compression Damping, Launch-Control, launch-Control Threshold, and Air Pressure.
    2. It is very very active and plush. More than Minutes or Pike air.
    3. It uses every bit of it's travel. I know this for sure after diving / falling off a bridge and landing front wheel first. I thought I would be ejected over the bars because of how severe the nosedive was. I could feel the suspension carefully and solidly absorb the impact. By the time the travel was used up, the rear of the bike was coming to the ground instead of over the top as I expected. The o-ring for measuring travel was topped out and all was in good shape.
    4. The lockdown (Launch-Control) improves the steeps and turns itself off when full travel is needed. I have tried some steep climbs where my Blur LT would get light in the front end if I did not reduce travel or really weight the front myself. With the Mojo, these same steeps cause only a little bit of lightness and NO wandering of the front wheel, even with the 150mm fork. However, this fork's "lockout' with "launch control" does improve even this. What Pace calls lockout is really "lock-down" (up to 90mm reduced travel) with active reserve travel (of at least 50mm) and the launch control is a speed-bump sensitive release for the lock down. On those same climbs where the front gets a bit light, I have repeated the climb with the fork locked-down (shortened fork / reduced travel) and the rear digs in like mad while the front remains glued down. This combination allows a greater range of effective climbing speed, cadence, and riding posture. I also expect that it will greatly enhance climbing muddy hills because this is where I noticed the greatest climbing improvements of a shortened fork on the Blur.
    5. The fork is extremely stiff and tracks as well (excellently) as the Mojo frame and rear end whether going slow, fast, steep up, steep down, through rocks and ruts, or jumping.


    The Launch Control is brilliant, but the button for Launch Control / lockdown has pros and cons.
    Pros:
    • It is easy to engage by slapping it down.
    • It is even easier to disengage. Set the treshold to disengage itself by a change in terrain or you can disengage yourself by bouncing the front end or by simply lifting up the switch.
    • The threshold can be adjusted (like Fox's platform) for how easy or hard a hit it takes to disengage.

    Cons:
    • It would be even easier to engage with a remote switch like Pace uses on it's racing fork.
    • The same control you depress to engage Launch Control is also the one you turn to adjust rebound. Since there are not postitve stops on the rebound control, you can accidently turn the rebound while depressing or lifting the Launch Control if your not mindful.

    So far, the best fork I've ever ridden. Comparing mostly to Minutes and Pikes. It is lighter than a Minute yet has the plushness, strength, thru-axle, and adjustability of a Pike, plus more travel and Launch-Control / lockdown. I hope it holds up.

    Just looking to clarify - which Pace Fighter are you running at the moment? why that one over the other one?

    RC40 Pace fighter
    https://www.pacecycles.com/product.a...D=2&subcat=465
    Weight 1838g
    Length/Travel 150 to 120mm/ 524mm fork length

    RC41 Pace fighter
    https://www.pacecycles.com/product.a...D=2&subcat=467
    Weight 1645g
    Length/Travel 150mm/ 524mm fork length

    thanks! (I am thinking to try one out myself early in the new year.

  21. #21
    flow where ever you go
    Reputation: noshortcuts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,509

    RC41 is the Fighter I'm running

    Quote Originally Posted by zzsean
    Just looking to clarify - which Pace Fighter are you running at the moment? why that one over the other one?
    I chose the RC41 over the RC40 because it is lighter (RC41 is air instead of coil in the RC40) and because by all accounts it is just as stiff and just as plush as any fork including Pace's RC40. The travel is linear throughout, very nice.

    What RC40 does have that the RC41 does not (besides coil) is adjustable travel (one click = 3mm).

    I did want to be able to reduce travel but only for steep climbs. I decided the lock-down with "Launch Control" on the RC41 would do the trick. Luckily, it does. It locks down as much as 90mm depending on how weighted the fork is during lock-down and leaves about 50mm active travel. It really is for climbing because on the flats, a full 90mm reduction is obviously too much.

    Launch Control releases the fork to full travel if you hit a fast (square/large) impact. You can also easily lift the control to release it to full travel, or quickly bounce the front end to release it.

    In practice the Mojo is a great climber, even with 150mm travel, but in the steeps, especially extreme steeps, reducing travel does improve the Mojo's greatness noticeabley.
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 11-27-2006 at 05:34 PM.

  22. #22
    flow where ever you go
    Reputation: noshortcuts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,509

    Final Mudguard and took a hacksaw to XTR derailleur

    mojo mudguard.JPG

    XTR dιrailleur weighs 130grams after cutting off the down-pull arm. It was just another mud trap anyway.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    849
    Sweet, sweet, sweet. I'm going to start my Mojo build soon as my parts start showing up.
    Is that a FD-971 derailleur that you cut?
    A bicycle will take you to fantastic places....if you let it.


    Ibis fan since '08 now rolling on the big wheeled Ripley.

  24. #24
    flow where ever you go
    Reputation: noshortcuts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,509

    Total Build - Parts and Weights

    Mojo Build........................................Weigh ts (* confirmed)
    Small .....................................………2540 *
    Rear D. X.0 ................................…....200 *
    Front D. XTR 961 .........................…..130 *
    Headset Token w/cap/bolt ..................120 *
    Crankset FSA Pro Team Carbon .........530 *
    BB FSA Platinum Pro MegaQuad Ti ....200 *
    Brakes MARTA SL w/ Goodridge line...720 *
    Shifters: X.0 Gripshift ..................…...190 *
    Cassette XTR 11-34 ..................….....240 *
    Chain 990 HOLLOWPIN .................….270 *
    Handlebar SALSA ProMoto ............….140 *
    Stem Thomson X4 110x10 ...........…...170 *
    Seatpost Thomson Setback 367mm ... 236
    Saddle Sette Race Ti ...................…...180 *
    Grips OSI Silicone ....................…….....51
    Wheels: Stans 355 / Revs/Comps / King ISO / Hope 20mm
    ................(710 /840 grams*) ..…........1550 *
    Rimstrips: Yellow Tape .................….…65
    Tires Kenda karma dtc 2.0 / 2.2 ...…....930 *
    Tubes Stan’s liquid ......................….….40
    Fork (Pace RC41 Fighter) 150mm …...1737 *
    Skewer DT Swiss ……………………...…45
    Pedals Shimano 545 ..............………...360 *
    Cables Jagwire L3 ..................………....85
    Piecemeal Total Weight ......…….....10664 (23.5 lbs.)
    Total Bike Weight weighed as whole..........24.4 lbs.

    Winter Weight (blame it on the Holidays!)
    8” adapter and rotor…........?
    Sram990 ........………….280
    Maverick Speedball…….475
    Conti Vert2.3/Surv2.1…1260
    Winter Weight:…………25.85lbs.

    For me, can't decide if I'll keep the Speedball. 480grams is hefty. It is fun and easy, but, this bike is so well balanced and already easier to get my weight back than other bikes I've had... so, still testing and I'm not sure yet. Also, I would definitely want the remote addition when it becomes available which will add more weight.
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 01-21-2007 at 12:58 PM.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    91

    ... and if we just ... Match Your Crank To Your Seatpost

    Check out the FSA K-Force light super setback seatpost (not ss 25) for a number of reasons. It is much more reliable than some think. (For lighter riders like myself 5'9" 150 lbs)
    It has the curved lines matching the moj, matches your current fsa crank, is carbon fiber thus matches your bike's weave, has great setback, tilt adjust and has been super reliable . Just use a little loctite when tightening down both sides of the micro adjust. Oh yea, sweet build.
    Cheers

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •