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  1. #1
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    Offset Bushings, Yay or Nay??

    I seem to flip between keeping my current 160 HD, going 140/150 or trying 650B.

    I have read the threads on offset bushings, just looking for an update. I love the idea of a little lower and slacker, but hate the idea of a wallowing ride.

    So, is it worth it? do you need to tune/fiddle with your shock? what shocks seem to work best?

    Thanks for the info

  2. #2
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    I would say yay. I have them on my HD 160, although I run the shock with a medium volume reducer setup by the local suspension expert.

    Definitely feels better than before

  3. #3
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    I've tried them on both the HD 160 and the SLR and they're really cool. Very subtle but you can slightly tell the difference and the Ibis still climbs amazingly well with the DW. Won't work with DBAir or X FUsion large volume shocks without rubbing the frame. Have fun

  4. #4
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    I've been intersted in this too. Can anyone who has done this mod describe the change in riding feel (handling, climbing, and rear suspension downhill performance) in more detail?

    Without having tried it, my intuition is that I would prefer if the effect was a little different. More bb lowering and less slackening, rather than the other way around. But curious to hear real-world impressions.

  5. #5
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    Having done it, I've measured that offset bushing can lower the BB and rider weight as much as 1/4 inch and slack the frame (head and seat tube angles) about 0.5 degree, increasing effective top tube length about 1/8 inch.

    Obviously, any warranty is voided. The safety and frame damage risk is having very likely tire to seat tube rub, even slamming the rear tire breaking the seat tube at bottom travel. When adding offset bushing to any bike, that clearance must be checked with any brand of shock, deflated and bouncing full rider weight on the seat. Custom made shimming the shock stroke reducing bottom travel to prevent contact is easy.

  6. #6
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    I've done it too on my Mojo SL....dropped the bb height 1/4", which was nice. Slackened the head angle, which was already at about 68 deg on my bike, and I need more ride time to decide if the pros outweigh the cons there for my super twisty, steep, and rocky local trails. Honestly the most noticeable thing of all was the fact that my bars *felt* about a cm higher, which I couldn't correct because my stem was already bottomed out.
    I too bought the aluminum ones from the guy in Poland on Ebay. They were affordable and worked fine but did produce a slight bit of play... a light click-click-click that could be felt when picking the bike up by the seat, but was not perceptible at all when riding....wouldn't bother me long term but I know some people would feel different so thought I'd mention it.
    I took it off so I could reinstall my Monarch AM that was coming back from a Push retune and would have allowed too much travel to work with the offset bushings. As soon as I get a little time in the shop I'm going to look into reducing the travel further on the Monarch, installing the offset bushings, and also dropping my revelation from 150 to 140. I think that might produce the ideal SL650 setup.

  7. #7
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    Back to the BurgetTec offset shock bushings on Mojo/ Mojo SLR. Has anyone used it successfully? I am looking to slacken the head angle, lower the BB by about .2" and relax the SA, all of wich would be accomplished with the Burgetec bushings, (in lieu of
    the angleset alternative- which raises the BB, an unwanted byproduct).
    One possible firment issue with the SLR is that the front bushing offset will shift the Fox RP23 shock 2 mm closer (forward) into the front frame mount. This appears may cause interfernce with the shock body/air valave rubbing on the frame mount? An alternative might be an upgrade to the 13 Fox Float CTD shock, which appears to have the airvalve located further inward from the shock eyelet. Any experience or input will be helpful!

  8. #8
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    I am all ears, too. Same situation here!!!
    Banshee Paradox V2
    Focus Thunder 650b tuned

  9. #9
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    Def yay. See HDR/Mojo HD long travel 650B rear shock clarification - Page 3

    In my current 150/143 mode, the 650b conversion behaves much nicer than in the original 160/150 mode.

  10. #10
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    Just put a set of the Burgtec titanium ones on my Mojo SL. Only a few rides in, but have alreadys et some PBs on climbs as well as descents Mountain Bike Ride Profile | To Mach and back - with Pete Murcutt near Aberystwyth | Times and Records | Strava.

    Definitely feels more stable on the downs and I feel more confident and not noticed any difference climbing though I do have the medium air volume reducer spacer in. I tried it initially with the large reducer, but felt like the rear ramped up too quickly and almost stalling on some square-edged hits. Seems easier to manual and generally loft the front over obstacles as well, but I am running 30% sag which helps )

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