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Thread: Muddin' Mojo

  1. #1
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    Muddin' Mojo

    It wasn't as muddy as I thought it would be after about 4 hours steady rain before dawn this morning. The trails dry out very quickly in NorCal coastal hills with the water table still low. It usually doesn't really bog up with much perm-a-mud until late January through mid March or early April depending on rain amounts.

    I spent the morning mounting up some fenders on the Mojo used previously on my Tracer. After about 3 hours from the time the rain stopped I rode. There were a lot of smaller puddles, mostly easy to ride around the edges. Still it was a good test for where the mud gets to on the bike.

    The downtube fender is call a "fu-gly" designed by MTBR poster "Brown Tooth" (named after his dog) in San Luis Obispo. This fender wraps under the BB where it's attached. And as you can see it protects most of the frame, rings, chain, and me from drivetrain-eating and pivot-grease-sucking mud.

    The seat tube and fugly protect the shock pretty well, but I'll be adding a small fender down the back of the seat tube or a Lizard skin to the shock if during full rain rides it gets very muddy.

    The main trouble area remaining that I never found a solution for before is mud flicking off the rear tire and packing behind the frond derailleur (you can see in the close up). Even with the major protection from the fugly, that mud off the rear tire gets to the chain resulting in rapid wear, chain suck, shifting problems, etc.

    The dw suspension is a solid rear triangle unlike the Horst suspension, so I think that using hard plastic a precisely shaped fender that closely clears the rear tire and front derailleur attached to the rear suspension triangle should be feasible. I never could do this with the Horst design due to the asymmetrically moving stays during travel.

    The goal is to keep the drive drain and brake rotors dry or only wet from direct pouring rain, not from water and mud off the ground.

    Another big advantage is clean up is much faster cleaning fenders and wheels, not mechanicals. Also my riding clothes stay clean above my knees on the worst days, so a quick hose down below the knees is usually all that’s needed. I'm using neoprene overshoe booties from Performance Bikes which keep my shoes dry and very warm on the worst stormy days.
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    Last edited by derby; 11-11-2006 at 03:12 PM.

  2. #2
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    You have an Ibis riser bar??

    Hold on a sec: you have cable routing under your top tube????

  3. #3
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    Yes, how and why did you loose the cable routers on the top? and, how and why did you replace them below? Just curious.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by danK
    You have an Ibis riser bar??

    Hold on a sec: you have cable routing under your top tube????
    The Ibis riser, 90mm (or 120mm) stem, and seat-post came OEM with my SX build. I prefer my Thompson post off the Tracer due to looks, I don't like the narrowing of the Ibis seat post just below the seat clamp.

    (2'nd question answered below. (Sorry Tom!)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    Yes, how and why did you loose the cable routers on the top? and, how and why did you replace them below? Just curious.
    I customed the cable routing. Ibis says it voids the center frame warrantee.

    I think they would be reasonable if the BB or pivot area fails though. Although I doubt if Ibis will ever have frame warrantee issues for breakage, it's way overbuilt and stout.

    I like to sit on my top tube when resting, but cables on top are uncomfortable and scratch the finish. Also I like the looks of cables hidden under or to the side of the top tube better. And as a minor practicality, I think the cables are more protected from getting damaged from major wrecks when positioned away from the perimeter of the bike. So when I saw the beautiful Mojo at Sea Otter last April, and knowing the handling geometry was what I like for this travel, and from riding a few dw-Link bikes before I knew it is far superior to others, I was nearly certain I'd buy one and that I'd reroute the cables more to my liking.

    So I got brave and drilled out the rivets to just below flush, cut through the clear coat and carefully chiseled the glued-on top tube cable mounts off. Then I filled the minor rivet depressions with bondo, painted the bondo black, wet-sanded it smooth (that clear gel-coat finish is tough and doesn't polish up after sanding easily!) and sprayed on about 6 layers of rattle-can automotive clear-coat.

    If you like it and don't want to risk damaging it yourself, I think you could send your frame to Cafee in Santa Cruz, who Ibis recommended for carbon fiber repair on the old web site (not sure if he's mentioned on the new web site). He'd do a better job than I did. But it would void the center frame warrantee.

    I see that all the earlier Ibis metal bikes also have cable mounted on the top of the TT. Maybe for straighter cable routing with the canti-brakes back then. But with disc brakes, lower routing is straighter.

    So I guess I did an abomination to tradition.

  6. #6
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    ^^^ interesting cable mod you've done there derby, and i have to say i tend to agree with all of your viewpoints. I had a Kona HT for years with top tube routing and it always annoyed me. Could you provide some close up pics of your custom cable routing work on your Mojo?...perhaps after you give it a nice clean....

    As for the mud guards...hmm well each to their own i guess. If it allows you to get out there on your machine then nice work. As you mentioned perhaps something like the little rear mud guards on the Spec Enduro's would work a treat (ie: http://www.specialized.com/OA_MEDIA/...otector_l.jpg).


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by starship303
    ^^^ interesting cable mod you've done there derby, and i have to say i tend to agree with all of your viewpoints. I had a Kona HT for years with top tube routing and it always annoyed me. Could you provide some close up pics of your custom cable routing work on your Mojo?...perhaps after you give it a nice clean....

    As for the mud guards...hmm well each to their own i guess. If it allows you to get out there on your machine then nice work. As you mentioned perhaps something like the little rear mud guards on the Spec Enduro's would work a treat (ie: http://www.specialized.com/OA_MEDIA/...otector_l.jpg).

    Cables are just hung under the TT with common zip-tie hangers, these are by Jagwire I bought at my local bike shop.

    And then routed all three cables around the left side of center frame the mid-strut. I considered drilling holes through the mid-strut for an even straighter route, but havenít found the courage, and it might weaken the structure.

    Iíve been using continuous cable housing with no cable lube for years, and found it provides much lower maintenance, especially if used in dusty or wet conditions (such as off road). There is negligible weight difference. I replace my cables and housings about once a year riding 3, to 4,K miles per year.

  8. #8
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    Derby,
    I have to say that I don't understand your reasoning for re-routing the cables at all. You say that you 'like the looks of cables hidden under or to the side of the top tube better' . But to achieve this, you 'drilled, chiseled, wet sanded, bondo-ed, and re-painted' a beautiful carbon frame. AND voided the warranty in the process.

    I don't mean to knock you, so please don't take it as such. It just seems like the cons far outweigh the pros here. And it just doesn't seem like a 'cleaner' look at all to me...IMO.

    But it still rides great. In the end, that's really all that matters....

  9. #9
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    Dirty

    You sir, are one dirty mojo

  10. #10
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    Mini Fender

    Hello all!

    about a 2 years ago now, we designed this little mud deflector to help keep the muck out of the bearings and lower link. Here's the rough cad. It would be nicer looking if we finished it and made some:

    http://ideinc.com/IBISide/122305/

    I even made a prototype and it worked... It's attached with a zip tie just below the front derailluer. We never made it since it was going to be $$$ to finish it up and get the tooling etc. and I wasn't sure anyone would care about it. The lower link bearings seem to survive pretty well without it too, so...
    What do you think? Is it something worth making or should it remain cancelled due to lack of interest?
    Hans

  11. #11
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    Looks great...go for it. But can you make it in black please!

  12. #12
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    It's not that muddy if you can still run 2.4 Mutanoraptors.

  13. #13
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    Make your own Mini Fender / Mud Guard

    Quote Originally Posted by hanssc
    Hello all!

    about a 2 years ago now, we designed this little mud deflector to help keep the muck out of the bearings and lower link. Here's the rough cad. It would be nicer looking if we finished it and made some:

    http://ideinc.com/IBISide/122305/

    I even made a prototype and it worked... It's attached with a zip tie just below the front derailluer. We never made it since it was going to be $$$ to finish it up and get the tooling etc. and I wasn't sure anyone would care about it. The lower link bearings seem to survive pretty well without it too, so...
    What do you think? Is it something worth making or should it remain cancelled due to lack of interest?
    Hans
    Great, thanks for the pics. I was planning to design something along this order for my Mojo. I wish that it also blocked mud from the derailleur, but it is a simple design and easy to make work.

    In fact, within minutes of seeing the drawings, I had already installed my own interpretation on the bike. I cut the mud guard from a $5 "rear deflector shield" from Mountain Cycling Accessories (ratail.com). That's why the logo is there.
    mojo mud guard.JPG

    You can see below that with an XTR derailleur, you have to cut out a bit on the right side.

    mojo mud guard installed.JPG

    Now I'll perfect the shape a little more and cut a cleaner one from a black only area of the same piece of plastic I cut this from.
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 11-20-2006 at 07:11 PM.

  14. #14
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    mud flap

    SWEET!
    mud flap thing V2 looks like it will work. When I did mine I have to modify the little ramp against the seat tube to get the right angle.
    I love this open source bicycle part design stuff....
    H

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