Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: schnee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    849

    Mojo XL, 6'-2"+, short stem? Please tell me your experiences.

    I've been riding an XL Mojo for a few years. I came from XC hardtails with very long top tubes, so I put on a 110mm stem and never thought twice. Reading through other posts here, though, I'm considering a 70mm. I'm having the exact challenges with handling that a shorter stem should fix.

    That said, I'm between 6'-2" and 6'-3", and have very long arms and legs. I have the saddle pretty far back on the rails to get good knee position, and even then compared to my old HT I feel like I'm almost sitting bolt upright. The Mojo top tube is really short.

    The idea of making my cockpit even more cramped is a little odd. Any riders of my height or more who ride an XL with a short stem care to share their experiences or advice?

  2. #2
    aka dan51
    Reputation: d-bug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    5,611
    I'm about 6'1"-6'2". I went from a 90mm to 70mm and it was the greatest thing I did for handling, along with lowering the stem and handlebar height.
    What's the worst that could happen? You'd be out $X and could always throw the long stem back on.
    My legs must be built different. I have a straight post and run the rails right in the middle.
    Those who know, ride a Mojo AND a Mojo HD.
    Quadzilla
    Quote Originally Posted by benja55
    Ok, whatever, cold water on my bike boner right there.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: c-wal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    276
    I'm 6'2" and run a 50mm and 65mm on the Mojo and wouldn't want anything longer. However, I am using 29.5" bars, lower hbar height, and a 160mm fork. I also run the seat in the middle of the rails on a straight post without any knee pain.
    Just pick up a cheap stem and try it out.

  4. #4
    www.derbyrims.com
    Reputation: derby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,788
    On my Mojo I went from a 90mm to 70mm stem and 1 inch wider bar lowered 1/2 inch (to no spacers under the stem) and feel major benefits in rough trail handling and standing pedal power increase.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CrankyMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    762
    I'm 6'3" and I run a 710mm bar with a 70mm stem... is perfect

    IMG_0225

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    339
    What fork are you running? I orginally was running a 2007 130mm Revelation with 90mm stem,but got rid of both..felt twitchee to say the least. I built up my Mojo with a more XC style set up, since I have a RFX built up on the heavy,agressive AM/DH side.I understood(and felt) the benfits of a shorter stem previous to setting up the Mojo. I'm now running a Pike(longer AC than the 07 Revelation) with 70mm feels much better. A 50mm would be to short for me, I would hit the bars with my knees when climbing standing up. I'm 6'2"-6'3".

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,848
    I'm runnin a XL Mojo SL with a 70mm no rise Thomson stem with 2" riser bars, and no spacers under the stem. I also rolled my bars back a bit to effectively shorten the reach as well.

    The bike has a 150mm Fox Float fork and I run about %30 sag.

    I'm 6'2" wiht about a 34" inseam

    Its definitely a small er cockpit and when standing out of the saddle I feel like my hands should be about an inch or 2 ahead of the bars and my knees come close to the bars BUT I don't really care and just live with it, not that big of a compromise considering how Vastly better the bike feels descending and cornering. At first you might feel like the bike is a bit twitchy but with some seat time you'll appreciate it big time. If you are a straight pure XC rider you might not like it though. I value descending abilities over climbing to a degree so take that into consideration as well. Stems aren't that expensive tho so go ahead and try it out!

    Here's some pics of my setup to give you an idea






  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,081
    Short stems rule. I actually went from a 50 to 70. Both work well for me with the 50 being the gravity setup. I actually think that 90 plus have really no place on modern mountain bikes (apart from the really tall of course).

  9. #9
    bike rider
    Reputation: Lelandjt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    4,063
    I'm 6'2" and run a 70mm on my XL. For XC races on non-techy tracks I've considered using a 90mm but haven't done it yet.
    Keep the Country country.

  10. #10
    _____
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    188
    I'm 6'5 and got my mojo SL 6 months ago. I weigh 200 with gear and ride primarily rocks with steep climbs and steep technical descents. I got professionally fitted an ended up replacing the 110 stem with a 90 with a 20 degree rise. It completely changed the bike. I have a 36 Talas up front and a DHX on the rear and the new Joplin 4 inch drop seat post. I HIGHLY recommend a drop seat post to anybody doing any kind technical riding. Combined with the travel adjust of the Talas is like having three bikes all at once.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: schnee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    849
    This is all awesome info, thanks.

    The fork is the standard 1st edition, Fox Float RL 140mm, but it's been PUSHed.

    I guess I'll just get the shorter stem and try it out. My current stem is a Thomson w/ rise, and Easton Monkey Bars with rise - right against the headset now, so if I get a 70mm, that's flat so it will lower the bars and give me room to play with height. Worst comes to worst I have some bars with less rise I can swap in.

    I have shoulders so wide people joke that I've had implants. I never trim bar ends.

    I'll give another shot to fit. I've been off the Mojo for a while for various reasons (knee surgery, etc.) so it'll feel fresh. An opportunity to adjust.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: schnee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    849
    A follow-up.

    Ridden with the 70mm stem twice now. It ROCKS.

    All the worries I had about twitchiness and cramped space - gone. After a few downhills, the increased control and stability rocked. Much, much better when pointed steeply down too.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: las-palmas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    79

    ... and if we just ... long / short stem

    Quote Originally Posted by schnee
    I've been riding an XL Mojo for a few years. I came from XC hardtails with very long top tubes, so I put on a 110mm stem and never thought twice. Reading through other posts here, though, I'm considering a 70mm. I'm having the exact challenges with handling that a shorter stem should fix.

    That said, I'm between 6'-2" and 6'-3", and have very long arms and legs. I have the saddle pretty far back on the rails to get good knee position, and even then compared to my old HT I feel like I'm almost sitting bolt upright. The Mojo top tube is really short.

    The idea of making my cockpit even more cramped is a little odd. Any riders of my height or more who ride an XL with a short stem care to share their experiences or advice?

    Short stem for going downhill and wide handlebars.
    Longer stems for being able to climb as well and ideal if you have strong enough arms to handle your bike with a narrow bar. If you need to get your weight more to the rear fo the bike, just put your stomach on the saddle. You will not need to use the pedals anyway when it really is going down. Be sure your brakes are OK.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    73
    6'6" here and running a 70mm stem here at the moment, I've not really had it on long enough to comment though, I'm still finding the front end a bit loose but I think I'll get used to it.

    Ebay a cheap shorter stem to try, even if you don't use it, keep it with your spares to try on future bikes, it does definitely transform a ride.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •