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  1. #1
    The Crow
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    Mojo (SL) vs Titus Moto Lite

    Any of you guys come from a ML II? I have an '07 and would like to know what the dif is. Balance, handling, speed, control on trail and XC. Thanks

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iwan
    Any of you guys come from a ML II? I have an '07 and would like to know what the dif is. Balance, handling, speed, control on trail and XC. Thanks
    Well ... gee a MotoLite is a great bike and if you have a 2007 why change? ride your bike!!

  3. #3
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    The Moto-Linte is a great bike, very well balanced, one of the very best trail bikes available. I demoed one while looking for the best bike to replace my Tracer in '06.

    Compared to the Moto-Lite the Mojo has more relaxed and very well balanced steering for it's longer travel. The Mojo rear suspension has even less pedal bob with the same shock yet is much smoother and more plush hitting rocks and big hits and jumps. The Mojo is easier than the Moto-Lite to ride fast up and down hill especially when rocky and rooty or loose and sandy or gravely. Both bikes are very well balanced and grip as good as it gets in corners.

    The Mojo is more versatile to set up XC or much more AM rough trail handing than the Moto-Lite can get to. You can limit travel and sharpen steering with a shorter fork and firm the damping on the Mojo to get a firmer XC ride like the Moto-lite. You could opt for the Talas fork to run shorter and more full XC mode with the shock firmed up with propedal for a very solid standing pedaling platform. And raise it up and release the propedal for rougher trails or faster downhills. Most riders eventually ride with a 140mm fork and no propedal all the time.

  4. #4
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    If you want to try one of the best carbon bike out there, get the Mojo. If you dont trust carbon, go for Moto Lite
    07 Giant Anthem 2 (Int'l Edition) | omartan.co.cc
    Im a MOJO Fanboy

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iwan
    Any of you guys come from a ML II? I have an '07 and would like to know what the dif is. Balance, handling, speed, control on trail and XC. Thanks
    IWAN, from reading the titus board, I thought you just got your ML II. Are you having problems?

  6. #6
    The Crow
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    Yip, sold it yesterday. For some or other reason I could never get 100% comfortable on it. Great bike. Handles well, climbes AND descents well, but I just couldn't get it dialled in.

    Tried stem lenght, handlebar, different fork...nada. Now I'm shopping again.

  7. #7
    Founder: Dirty3hirties
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iwan
    Great bike. Handles well, climbes AND descents well, but I just couldn't get it dialled in.
    That sounds dialed to me.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iwan
    Yip, sold it yesterday. For some or other reason I could never get 100% comfortable on it. Great bike. Handles well, climbes AND descents well, but I just couldn't get it dialled in.

    Tried stem lenght, handlebar, different fork...nada. Now I'm shopping again.

    Too bad, good luck in your next bike!

  9. #9
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    Whats your defination of dialled in? Cause if a bike climbs and descends well, its basically dialled in.
    07 Giant Anthem 2 (Int'l Edition) | omartan.co.cc
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  10. #10
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    I was also debating between these 2 bikes, and tried both at the local shop back to back.

    I ended up buying the Mojo. No regret so far.

    I will have a detailed review as soon as I can hit my regular trail.

    I raced with it this weekend, and it was great, but it was a new trail to me, so it makes it harder to compare with what I had before.

  11. #11
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    I just sold my ML and my new Mojo arrives Friday. So I'll let you know as soon as I get a chance to ride it.
    Mr_Mojorisen

  12. #12
    The Crow
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    oheckler: got your frame yet?
    There's a feeling I get
    When I look to the West
    And my spirit is crying for leaving

  13. #13
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    Yes I did.
    I have been meaning to get back to you but I wanted to get some miles on the bike first to give you a better comparison between the two bikes.
    I got my new Mojo about 6 weeks ago! Of course my immediate joy was quickly derailed because the very night my shiny new Mojo arrived at my doorstep I came down with the most heinous flu ever. I didn't get to ride it for over a week. And even then I was still so week I was only able to ride about 13 miles. Since then I have put about 150 miles it and lets just say I am very impressed.
    I have been riding for the past 18 years (except for a 4-5 year break that just ended 18 months ago). I have owned a '98 Heckler which I loved and road the hell out of until I started riding again in August of '06. At that point I sold the Heckler and bought an Intense Tracer. This was a definite upgrade but mainly because it came with disc brakes. That and its ability to remain active under braking allowed me to descend like never before. It did not take long to realize that I wanted something current with 5 inches of travel or more. After reading about the new Mojo in MBA I immediately fell in love with it. I live in Sonoma County were Ibis was born and always wanted one but never got around to buying one. The other 2 bikes on my list were an Ellsworth Epiphany and a Titus Motolite. Last spring on a trip to Boulder I demoed an Epiphany and a Motolite (thanks Singletrack Factory!). Loved them both but the Epy was more plush and just felt right. So now I had narrowed my list to either a new Mojo or an Epiphany with the ML in third place. As soon as I got back I found a "just can't pass up" deal on a used ML frame. I decided to buy the frame and use the parts off of my Tracer as I saved my money for either the Epiphany or Mojo. Iíve got to say from the first day I rode the ML on familiar trails I felt like I had been riding it all of my life. I actually debated keeping the ML and upgrading it with the money I had saved.
    Well last month I finally decided to buy the Mojo (I really wanted a completely new bike) even though I had not ridden one yet. Family obligations being what they are, I opted for the SX build with the Talas RLC upgrade. Now that I've been on a few rides here is what I think:
    First off let me say it definitely steers quicker than either the ML or Epiphany. Which, at first I was not sure I liked. I did not have the same initial comfort level that I had on the Motolite. This is probably because the Motolite is so similar to the Tracer I had been riding. However, now that I have been out on a few more rides and am closer to having the suspension dialed, I must say I am enjoying it more and more. The suspension, at speed (more on that later), is just so plush that already I have descended faster on familiar trails then on the ML. On the first ride I had a tendency to over steer and not end up on the line I wanted. This could have been partially because I was still recovering from the flu. My next ride was much better. Now I am able to place my wheels with a new precision that is unmatched by the ML. The ML did have a little more stability at speed, probably due to its longer wheel base, but the Mojo's suspension is so much more active and plush that I am happy with the trade off. Not to say that the ML wasn't plush. The Mojo is just on another level. Too clarify the Mojo is by no means squirrelly, it holds its line very well even in very gnarly terrain, it just responds instantly to any input.
    I am not into huge air but I do hit every jump I find on my local trails. I gotta say this bike lands like a cat! And it's very easy to control while in the air.
    Everyone has been raving about this bikes climbing ability. This has been a little bit of a let down for me. Not because it doesn't climb well. It's a fantastic climber. But so was the ML. I guess I was expecting to be blown away, but it just isn't that much better than the ML. It is a little more active and seated traction is better but traction while standing is about the same or maybe even better on the ML. The suspension on the Mojo gets better the faster you go so when climbing slow technical terrain it does not react as well on square edged hits. It actually feels a lot like my old Heckler in these situations though not as severe. Once you are carrying a little more speed, square edged hits are no longer a problem. On descents it just eats them up along with everything else in its path.
    All in all IMHO the Mojo is definitely a better bike but we are really splitting hairs because I believe the Motolite is also a fantastic bike. I have not regretted buying the Mojo for an instant.

    I hope this helps
    Mr_Mojorisen

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by oheckler
    Yes I did.
    I have been meaning to get back to you but I wanted to get some miles on the bike first to give you a better comparison between the two bikes.
    I got my new Mojo about 6 weeks ago! Of course my immediate joy was quickly derailed because the very night my shiny new Mojo arrived at my doorstep I came down with the most heinous flu ever. I didn't get to ride it for over a week. And even then I was still so week I was only able to ride about 13 miles. Since then I have put about 150 miles it and lets just say I am very impressed.
    I have been riding for the past 18 years (except for a 4-5 year break that just ended 18 months ago). I have owned a '98 Heckler which I loved and road the hell out of until I started riding again in August of '06. At that point I sold the Heckler and bought an Intense Tracer. This was a definite upgrade but mainly because it came with disc brakes. That and its ability to remain active under braking allowed me to descend like never before. It did not take long to realize that I wanted something current with 5 inches of travel or more. After reading about the new Mojo in MBA I immediately fell in love with it. I live in Sonoma County were Ibis was born and always wanted one but never got around to buying one. The other 2 bikes on my list were an Ellsworth Epiphany and a Titus Motolite. Last spring on a trip to Boulder I demoed an Epiphany and a Motolite (thanks Singletrack Factory!). Loved them both but the Epy was more plush and just felt right. So now I had narrowed my list to either a new Mojo or an Epiphany with the ML in third place. As soon as I got back I found a "just can't pass up" deal on a used ML frame. I decided to buy the frame and use the parts off of my Tracer as I saved my money for either the Epiphany or Mojo. Iíve got to say from the first day I rode the ML on familiar trails I felt like I had been riding it all of my life. I actually debated keeping the ML and upgrading it with the money I had saved.
    Well last month I finally decided to buy the Mojo (I really wanted a completely new bike) even though I had not ridden one yet. Family obligations being what they are, I opted for the SX build with the Talas RLC upgrade. Now that I've been on a few rides here is what I think:
    First off let me say it definitely steers quicker than either the ML or Epiphany. Which, at first I was not sure I liked. I did not have the same initial comfort level that I had on the Motolite. This is probably because the Motolite is so similar to the Tracer I had been riding. However, now that I have been out on a few more rides and am closer to having the suspension dialed, I must say I am enjoying it more and more. The suspension, at speed (more on that later), is just so plush that already I have descended faster on familiar trails then on the ML. On the first ride I had a tendency to over steer and not end up on the line I wanted. This could have been partially because I was still recovering from the flu. My next ride was much better. Now I am able to place my wheels with a new precision that is unmatched by the ML. The ML did have a little more stability at speed, probably due to its longer wheel base, but the Mojo's suspension is so much more active and plush that I am happy with the trade off. Not to say that the ML wasn't plush. The Mojo is just on another level. Too clarify the Mojo is by no means squirrelly, it holds its line very well even in very gnarly terrain, it just responds instantly to any input.
    I am not into huge air but I do hit every jump I find on my local trails. I gotta say this bike lands like a cat! And it's very easy to control while in the air.
    Everyone has been raving about this bikes climbing ability. This has been a little bit of a let down for me. Not because it doesn't climb well. It's a fantastic climber. But so was the ML. I guess I was expecting to be blown away, but it just isn't that much better than the ML. It is a little more active and seated traction is better but traction while standing is about the same or maybe even better on the ML. The suspension on the Mojo gets better the faster you go so when climbing slow technical terrain it does not react as well on square edged hits. It actually feels a lot like my old Heckler in these situations though not as severe. Once you are carrying a little more speed, square edged hits are no longer a problem. On descents it just eats them up along with everything else in its path.
    All in all IMHO the Mojo is definitely a better bike but we are really splitting hairs because I believe the Motolite is also a fantastic bike. I have not regretted buying the Mojo for an instant.

    I hope this helps
    I would like to know if other Mojo riders experience the same as oheckler while climbing slow technical terrain. I am looking for an excellent climber (very active while climbing) and was starting to warm up for the Mojo.

    oheckler, how much sag are you running on your Mojo?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedro
    I would like to know if other Mojo riders experience the same as oheckler while climbing slow technical terrain. I am looking for an excellent climber (very active while climbing) and was starting to warm up for the Mojo.

    oheckler, how much sag are you running on your Mojo?
    Me, I wonder how the titanium El Guapo compares to the Mojo. The EG will be slightly heavier but should be able to take a lot more abuse.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedro
    I would like to know if other Mojo riders experience the same as oheckler while climbing slow technical terrain. I am looking for an excellent climber (very active while climbing) and was starting to warm up for the Mojo.

    oheckler, how much sag are you running on your Mojo?
    14mm (9/16") and 1 1/2" on the Talas

    I hope I didn't give you the impression that the mojo is not a good climber. It is one of the best climbing bikes I have ever ridden. The only other bike I would put in the same category would be the Ellsworth Epiphany. Unfortunately I only have a 3 hour ride on the Epiphany so any comparison between the two is not really fair.
    That being said I would say the Ellsworth is more active while climbing and with its higher bottom bracket, you don't have to worry as much about pedal placement in really technical terrain. The Mojo responds better to those sudden bursts of power that are often necessary to clear an obstacle or to carry speed over a steep rise. The Motolite is not as active as either of them. It responds better to sudden bursts of power than the Epiphany and has better clearance than the Mojo.
    Mr_Mojorisen

  17. #17
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    Well dont compare between 2 bikes easily vespasianus, the EG might be slightly heavier (which a rider usually can adapt to) but how about its geometry?
    07 Giant Anthem 2 (Int'l Edition) | omartan.co.cc
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  18. #18
    Trail Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedro
    I would like to know if other Mojo riders experience the same as oheckler while climbing slow technical terrain. I am looking for an excellent climber (very active while climbing) and was starting to warm up for the Mojo.

    oheckler, how much sag are you running on your Mojo?
    Square edge hits are about the same as my Tracer(Horst Link). It may be slightly less effective than the Tracer, but not by much. The VPP bikes work better on square edge hits. The Mojo isn't as seamless when hitting these as the Blur. You get used to it and can adapt. The only weakness of the Mojo, in my opinion, is the low bottom bracket height. In certain rough,slow,steep climbs, the pedals hit too much. I have a Talas, and in technical climbs, I have to keep it in the highest fork setting. Some climbs can be done in the middle setting. I use the low setting on long, smooth, steep climbs. If it was about .4 -.5 in. higher, it would be perfect for me. I find my pedal sometimes hitting on rocks that My Tracer easily made it over. The Mojo is so well balanced(fore and aft), that it makes seated climbing very easy. It also is very active up and DH. The Mojo is excellent in fast single track. The carbon fiber frame has held up as well as any aluminum bike I've owned, and it has been a year since I bought it.
    [size=4]Don[/size]

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quattro
    The only weakness of the Mojo, in my opinion, is the low bottom bracket height.
    I would have to agree that this is the Mojo's biggest weekness. I think it would be perfect with a .5 in higher bottom bracket and a .25 in longer top tube. Of course that would probably completely throw off the Mojos sweet handling.
    Oh well, It's still the best all around mountain bike I have ever ridden.
    Mr_Mojorisen

  20. #20
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    oheckler, try more sag

    oheckler, you may try increasing your sag by 1/16" or 2/16", and see how that affects your climbing performance.
    Looking at the mojo's rear axle path on the linkage program, reveals that the increased sag will place the bike in a part of its axle path which I beleive is better for climbing (horizontal component of the axle path curve pointing forward, arcing towards the rider).
    However, that may reduce the plushness when hitting a square edge hit while on level ground.
    If you do try it with less sag let me know how it felt.
    Quattro, The Tracer type rear suspension is heralded as the BEST for active climbing suspension, If the Mojo is comparable, it should work very well.

  21. #21
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    I rode an Ibis Mojo for much of last year but sold it recently, mainly because I had a medium and it was slightly too small for me. My intention was to replace it immediately with a large, but before I did so, a Motolite Exogrid appeared on Ebay, so I bought it to see how it compared.

    My ultimate conclusion is that the Mojo is the better bike, with every ride feeling special, and giving you a stupid grin on your face. The Motolite is a great bike, but it is slightly heavier, less plush, doesn't carve singletrack as well, bobs so it requires some pro-pedal dialled in. The Motolie is still an awesome bike, and has some advantages - for me it fits better, Ti lasts better, it's slightly stiffer latterally.

    I still have concerns over the longevity of the Mojo, having gone through two rear triangles, so am interested to see how the Motolite holds up. Must say though I'm very tempted by a Ti El Guapo!!

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedro
    I would like to know if other Mojo riders experience the same as oheckler while climbing slow technical terrain. I am looking for an excellent climber (very active while climbing) and was starting to warm up for the Mojo.

    oheckler, how much sag are you running on your Mojo?

    Quote Originally Posted by oheckler
    ....but traction while standing is about the same or maybe even better on the ML. The suspension on the Mojo gets better the faster you go so when climbing slow technical terrain it does not react as well on square edged hits. It actually feels a lot like my old Heckler in these situations though not as severe.
    I noticed the same thing when I rode an Mkiii up slow technical(granny ring)
    terrain. Comparing it to the Chumba XCL which I currently ride, it just seemed
    little choppy pedaling up the granny ring technical stuff where you couldn't keep up your momentum, and standing traction wasn't as good either.
    The XCL surprisingly seemed faster doing technical climbs, which I didn't expect. (The XCL is a strut based Horst link like the ML)
    According to DW, the Mkiii and Mojo are designed with similar rates.
    Try the sag between 30 and 35 %, if you don't already have that.
    DW recommends that for rough trail riding.

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