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  1. #1
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    Mojo SL to replace my Nomad!?



    Hi there,

    Just ordered a Matte clear, med SL frame. I was hoping that it would replace my rather heavy Nomad (35lb) but now having read a few articles and forum discussions, I'm not sure that I've done the right thing.

    I ride natural trails (here in UK) but visit small bike parks (Chicksands, Woburn etc) to hone my skills, so I will doing 10ft. gap doubles and up to 6ft drops (not to flat) fairly regularly. I am not wealthy (teacher/coach) so need one FS bike to compliment my HT. - Have I chosen the right bike?

    The Nomad is lovely but just too heavy for day rides in technical terrain.


    Any of you use or plan to use your SL's for similar duties?

    Thanks, my first post here! much better than any of the UK forums

  2. #2
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    I meant't to say, that I think the Nomad is up to doing much bigger stuff than I will ever have the balls to do!

    It seems from reading a few peoples comments on this forum that the SL may not be up to my type of riding? I hope it is, as it seems on paper to be THE ideal bike for me - 27lb ish with a strong build and the possibility of using a lighter set of wheels and fork for all out XC riding.

  3. #3
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    Personally I think the ibis Mojo SL is not the bike you need. Not to say that it can not do such things, but from my experience I would not think it best suited for both what you have in mind, as well as its intended purpose.

    I am a Giant guy, so the reigns are great for this. They are not a jump park bike of course and neither are they a DH bike. However, I have taken my Reign on all of these with no probs at all, it has really handled them extremely well considering and I have even won quite a few races off the back of mine in a DH context. Its been to Whistler and jumps parks, of course it is not perfect for such things yet it is really quite good at being versitile somewhat more than other bikes that are perhaps best suited for the one purpose...so its great. It has very good body language skills when jumping especially the big stuf - if you build it up right; so it can handle such tasks well enough if you know what you are doing.

    There are many other bikes of course, but I will let others also give you their 2c worth to give you a diversity of opinions.

    Excuse the spelling....I just came back from my works Christmas party here in J-Land...so im a bit translucent...ha ha ha.

    Edit after a cup of tea...!

    But, back to the MOJO...it is a GREAT bike indeed, it just depends on what you are going to do with it...and I personally do not like carbon frames for extreme occasions.
    Last edited by Sim2u; 12-26-2007 at 07:06 AM.

  4. #4
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    add knolly endorphin to the sort list if you are still in the market.
    ride fast...take chances...

  5. #5
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    Wooo.. I dont know about that but I have never had the intention about putting my mojo to such extreme use.. I bought my mojo as a replacement for my Stumpjumper for technical trail riding but not for FR/Enduro DH. I think the mojo is more for XC/All Mountain usage.

    For FR/Endoro DH, I use my Scott Ransom and its great for the climbing and mental downhill terrains. Click here to view: Scott Ramsom Enduro DH setup

    Cheers

    John

  6. #6
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    This is now worrying me - what is the SL for then, 5+ inches of travel just to absorb a few roots and small rocks and 2ft drops, surely not? My old superlight from years a go would do that and more.

    I found that my Heckler (05) was just a little more bike than I needed, it coped with 6ft drops and jumps no problem but the Nomad is just too much bike for me both in weight and it's ability.

    I just love the look of the SL and it's "on paper" possibilites (if it were Al), so I hope someone is going to tell me that it's up to the job!

  7. #7
    Neg reppers r my biatches
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    amount of travel is VERY misleading, unfortunately for you. There are freeride hardtails with 0" travel, but made for hardcore hucks, etc.....amount of travel is the WRONG parameter to use to buy a bike, though mtb mags have muddied that water unfortunately

    many examples, but take the Preston FR 5" travel bike...nothing in common with the Mojo, or other XC 5" travel bikes

    27 lbs will simply not get you a manly enough bike for your needs imho
    Last edited by FoShizzle; 12-26-2007 at 08:18 AM.

  8. #8
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    erm if the SL dont cut it, I guess even the standard Mojo wont cause, Ibis doesnt remove weight from the SL and make it become weaker. So I dont think the SL is less durable then the regular Mojo.

    Honestly, I dont know if the Mojo is build to withstand such abuse. I hope some Ibis guys would shed light on the op post. Especially those Mojo owners who build their Mojo for abuse.
    07 Giant Anthem 2 (Int'l Edition) | omartan.co.cc
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  9. #9
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    The Mojo and Mojo SL are XC/AM bike frames. They can take small jumps and drops on a regular basis, but nothing even close to what you describe.

    The Nomad is designed to take the abuse/use that you intend.

  10. #10
    Neg reppers r my biatches
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Shorts
    The Mojo and Mojo SL are XC/AM bike frames. They can take small jumps and drops on a regular basis, but nothing even close to what you describe.

    The Nomad is designed to take the abuse/use that you intend.
    correct indeed...long legged XC bikes in my book, which is not a bad thing and in fact is what most (of us) do at most anyway......makes much more sense to put faster tires etc. on the Nomad in this case

  11. #11
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    Those aren't huge jumps, so you should be fine. You will save much weight and have as much strength as the Heckler or Nomad, The lighter and smoother pedaling Mojo will climb much easier. The Mojo’s quicker handling difference would be the only consideration, for ordering the Mojo with an adjustable travel bigger fork.

    The Mojo SL can handle it; it is as strong as the original Mojo which is as strong as a Nomad in the Large and XL sizes and as strong as a Heckler in the smaller sizes according to Ibis rider and bench tests.

    The handling is different than a Nomad, more climbing and all around trail riding oriented. The steering geometry is steeper at 69 degrees with a 140mm Fox fork, compared to the Nomad's 67 or 68 degree (?) slower handling with the same size fork. You might consider getting a Talas 36 to extend the fork to 160mm and a 68 degree steering head angle for more of a Heckler-like handling feel and BB height for landing the 10 ft doubles and steep drops.

  12. #12
    Church of the Wheel
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Shorts
    The Mojo and Mojo SL are XC/AM bike frames. They can take small jumps and drops on a regular basis, but nothing even close to what you describe.
    *cough* bullspit *cough*

    Pics of Ibis test rider posted originally by Hans, of Ibis:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13
    Neg reppers r my biatches
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtb143
    *cough* bullspit *cough*

    Pics of Ibis test rider posted originally by Hans, of Ibis:
    so if i see a picture of a rigid hardtail being ridden that same way by a test rider (who does not care if it damages), it implies it is an AM bike?

  14. #14
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    he is wearing a full face which probably mean he do this a lot of times on the Mojo.
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  15. #15
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    Well that guy must be so skilled that he managed to get his balls not to hit the saddle after that jump shown in the pics
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  16. #16
    Neg reppers r my biatches
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheelhot
    he is wearing a full face which probably mean he do this a lot of times on the Mojo.
    good point.....if i wear my full face it also implies i am gnar, even if i ride the same trails as i would otherwise

  17. #17
    Church of the Wheel
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    so if i see a picture of a rigid hardtail being ridden that same way by a test rider (who does not care if it damages), it implies it is an AM bike?
    No, these pics do not imply anything about a hardtail being ridden by someone who doesn't care if it gets destroyed. Rather, these pics imply that the Mojo is a tough frame that I dare you to break. I'll come visit you in the hospital if you decide to take this dare - not because the frame broke, but because you did while trying.

  18. #18
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    Now you lot over the pond have woken up it's sounding a bit more of a possibility

    My riding is more suited to what the Heckler is designed for, at my age I've no intention of going any bigger

    Keep it coming - anyone likely to be about from Ibis?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelife
    Just ordered a Matte clear, med SL frame. I was hoping that it would replace my rather heavy Nomad (35lb) but now having read a few articles and forum discussions, I'm not sure that I've done the right thing.
    Cyclelife - Keep reading the forums, and you will discover three things:

    1. There are many Mojo owners who ride very aggressively.

    2. There are extremely few instances of frame breakage, except for some related to an early swingarm problem that has long since been remedied.

    3. There are no dissatisfied Mojo owners (except for a couple who would prefer a slightly higher BB height).

  20. #20
    Founder: Dirty3hirties
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelife
    Now you lot over the pond have woken up it's sounding a bit more of a possibility

    My riding is more suited to what the Heckler is designed for, at my age I've no intention of going any bigger

    Keep it coming - anyone likely to be about from Ibis?
    Give Ibis a call. Since you're asking here, you might as well go straight to the source. I don't think this is so much a matter of frame strength as geo and intended use. If you're doing doubles and 6ft drops but not to flats, there isn't that much impact....unless you're totally case the landing. Hopefully not of course and I'm sure you have no intention of doing so. However, the Mojo has more trail oriented geo....it's definitely not a stunt bike. You could take it there and I'm sure it would be fine.....but let's say you spend 80% of your time in the park, there are other alternatives. But you also say that you want an XC oriented bike around 27 lbs. It's going to be kinda hard to find a bike that will absolutely be THEEE best for both situations. You're asking a bit too much IMO. You're going to have to compromise. Every bike is. That being said, I think the Mojo is very very versatile and arguably the most versatile bike in the industry IMO.

    I don't agree that the pix of that test rider warrants or makes any claims to how you should ride the Mojo. They could have shown a rider going down much more extreme terrain. Does that mean it's a good idea? No way. Just because there's a pix of someone doing something doesn't mean you should correlate that with "intended use".

  21. #21
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    ddraewwg,

    Thanks for that, I will spend 80%+ of my time on the trail, with the skills areas taking up the rest. I ride there to build my skills for the trails, not to increase my ability to huck big drops or clear big gaps, as I said I'm way too old for that now

    Looking at the geometries, the SL is a lot closer to the Heckler than the Nomad and up till now the Heckler is my favourite bike.

  22. #22
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    sounds like someone wants a chumba xcl

    http://www.chumbaracing.com/xcl.shtml

  23. #23
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    That Chumba looks very similar to my old superlight with added linkages!

    I'm sure it's much better than I am but it does'nt do it for me.

    Thanks all the same.

  24. #24
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    A sub 5 lb frame

    Hi Guys, This is one of those "well it depends" kind of deals... We would not normally expect people to do that with the SL or Mojo (6' drops). It might do OK though depending on how much the person weighs, how they land, how many mistakes they make etc...
    I am confident you'd love the bike for the more XC / AM use, but I couldn't say regarding the durability for the jumping part of the program.
    Bottom line, we don't suggest it, but we will cover failed parts under warranty. The strength of the DT shock is unknown to me for jumping use as well, so I might go with the known Fox shock. It would save some $ as well.
    Fo is right, you could probably build your Nomad lighter and get closer to where you want to be. The heckler is a great bike for what you describe as well.
    The Mojo will be amazing in the the rest of the park, can you keep them both?
    Hans
    Hans
    Ibis Cycles, Inc.

  25. #25
    Neg reppers r my biatches
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    Quote Originally Posted by hanssc
    The Mojo will be amazing in the the rest of the park, can you keep them both?
    Hans
    now this may be a company i can dig! yeah...no sense in making a 35 lb Mojo, cant you find a way to keep em both? as great as any one bike may be, its sure hard to ever imagine a "one bike" for anybody doing any variety of riding. the mojo built light would be sweet but at 27 or even 28 lbs, the Mojo, or any 27 lb bike for that matter, is not going to be true AM material no matter what any MTB mag says IMHO, but I know very little

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