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  1. #1
    mojo mofo
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    Mojo product reviews

    Why aren't more Mojo owners reviewing their bikes in the product review section?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by talkshow-host
    Why aren't more Mojo owners reviewing their bikes in the product review section?
    I'll post my review in a couple of weeks, when the bike gets into its second month of riding. Three possible reasons for the few reviews:
    • The bike is so good that there is little point talking about it
    • There might not be that many around yet
    • Some people (like "Jose") have already posted bogus reviews: a regular problem with the review section that might make people less inclined to post in the unreliable product review section (this one guy is claiming that the frame is not stiff, I wonder if he is the same guy that was going around the forum claiming that carbon is flexy

    The Mojo might end up not having a big MTBR/forum presence either. The bike works so well that there is really little reason to fidget and try out a pletora of shocks/forks/whatever-else to make it work. The never ending fidgeting is the main reason other forums get a lot of posting (the other, in some forum, is a frat house mentality, the homer syndrom, that seems to be luckily missing from the IBIS forum).
    Last edited by Davide; 03-11-2007 at 08:58 AM.

  3. #3
    Green Mojo
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    shortage of postings

    I received my bike about 6 weeks ago. I have been too busy riding mine to post more.

    On interesting observation - yesterday I rode with a buddy that I had not ridden with since I got my new Mojo. We used to essentially race or ride head to head through our standard 2 hour Saturday morning ride (lots of climbs). Yesterday I found I was up everything faster and down everything quicker. I waited for him several times yesterday. Was it the new bike or did I just have a good day? I think it's the bike. I do notice overall a considerable improvement in riding ability, increased downhill speed (probably due to more confidence), and definitely more uphill climbing speed. I love my Mojo, can't get enough riding time.

  4. #4
    mojo mofo
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    You have a few good points there D, I wondered about that guy and his flex talk. I suppose if one was to try and downhill race it they might find that it isn't as solid as a 40 lb DH bike, but I don't think it was designed for that. I guess there has to be something negative to say about it otherwise his review would get grouped with the rest of the 5/5s.

    No doubt there won't be as many Mojos as there are Blurs or FSRs, but it seems that there are a few out there. Maybe I'm going a little loopy after just looking at the carbon sculpture in my living room for the past 3.5 months, so I'm looking for owners stories until I can add mine.

    Thanks bikerneil for giving me a real world comparative tidbit. Only a few weeks now until I can see that for myself.

  5. #5
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    I haven't posted mine because my industry nine wheels are 3 weeks out. But, if it rides half as good as it looks, I may ask it to marry me.

  6. #6
    It's the axle
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    Cool!

    By some stoke of luck I-9 just happened to have the wheels I wanted. Even the frame was here the day after I called the bike shop.

    Tomorrow my bike will be ready to ride. Just the crank is left to show up.

    I'm nervous. And I probably won't even do the tests I normally do on a new bike until after riding it a while, just because I don't want to find out. I do things nobody else does. I'm pretty tough to please. Especially coming from the NRS Air. That bike isn't plush, but it's about as efficient as can be. And pretty stiff. We'll see. I've posted bad reviews on the 2001 and 2002 NRS Air. I hope the Mojo doesn't let me down. Actually, the bike is so nice, I think I can overlook some of my more rigorous standards. I think Ibis is an amazing group, after spending time on this bike over the last couple of weeks, putting it together. Lots of engineering went into this animal. Plus I trust the reviews I've read in this forum.

    But like a few others have said, this thing is a sight to behold. More like a musical instrument than a bike. I'm still trying to figure out how to post my thoughts on this bike design without sounding dorky.

    It looks like we're going to have several Mojos come to life in the next couple of days. It's time for some high ju-ju. And singletrack.

  7. #7
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    I'm looking forward to your review. I'm also coming from an NRS Air and I'm dying to get a ride on the Mojo. I recently rode a 575 which bobbed like a duck in the little ring but it was a superstar downhill. I'm hoping, based on the reviews in this folder, that the Ibis is a bit more stable. I'm willing to give up some plushness for efficiency. Get that bike together and give us a review for goodness sake!

  8. #8
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    Waiting for the snow to melt....

    I had some great rides late last fall and even some in January, but for the last couple months there's been a lot of ice out there. I am also waiting on some components to show up. Right now I am still on some loaner parts and figure the review will be even better when I have the upgraded drivetrain. From the handfull of rides I had, the mojo exceeded my expectations at almost everything. Coming from a steel hardtail I had some adjustments to make in order to get used to the travel, geometry etc., but after a few rides I was blown away by the tech sections I was cleaning both up and down. I'll post a full review when I have a chance to ride the bike with all the updated parts.....

  9. #9
    www.derbyrims.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by talkshow-host
    You have a few good points there D, I wondered about that guy and his flex talk. I suppose if one was to try and downhill race it they might find that it isn't as solid as a 40 lb DH bike, but I don't think it was designed for that. I guess there has to be something negative to say about it otherwise his review would get grouped with the rest of the 5/5s.
    A quality FS design should have a little flex. Without a small amount of flex the bike would skip and bounce off the ground very easily when leaned over in a turn on rough surfaces without a berm.

    The vertical suspension when the bike is upright should be balanced with some ability to allow vertical compliance when the bike is leaned over far off vertical.

    Metal bikes naturally flex even when the tubes are heavily triangulated. Carbon fiber is much stiffer per weight and flex must be more conscious to the designer. A metal bike designer engineers to reduce flex, a carbon fiber designer must engineer to allow some flex.

    The Ibis Mojo Carbon design feels very balanced and hooks up tire grip incredibly on flat rough corners. Whatever the small amount of flex there is it works very well with the overall very efficient balance of the Mojo when riding.

    The Mojo will attract and satisfy the most critical of expert bike riders.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by talkshow-host
    You have a few good points there D, I wondered about that guy and his flex talk. I suppose if one was to try and downhill race it they might find that it isn't as solid as a 40 lb DH bike, but I don't think it was designed for that. I guess there has to be something negative to say about it otherwise his review would get grouped with the rest of the 5/5s.

    Thanks bikerneil for giving me a real world comparative tidbit. Only a few weeks now until I can see that for myself.
    Yep, you have to compare apples with apples, in this case frames in the 5.5-7.0 pounds range.

    "Flex" is something very hard to determine on the trail, the interaction of the frame with the wheels/tires/suspension you are using is very hard to sort out. I come from a 5-spot, that is considered, especially at my weight of150, a sturdy bike. The Mojo, with identical components, tracks better the the 5-spot on rough terrain. Roots or rock, upright or leaning, it goes very straight. But I would resist calling the Mojo stiffer then the 5-spot. It feels like it is, but it might be the suspension system that tracks the surface better and induces less lateral movement. Stiffer? Yes? no? Who cares, it does track better

    But to the point, to say that a Mojo is "not stiff" means almost nothing, and that is my main problem with that review in the product review section. It is just one of the marketing perils that the Mojo might run into: it is carbon, and some people have preconceived notions about carbon, it is very pretty, and some people associate rough looks with sturdyness, and it is light. Light weight in particular might put the bike in a category where it does not belong to: as sturdy as it is and with 5.5" of travel I could downhill race this beast if I had the skills
    Last edited by Davide; 03-12-2007 at 02:46 PM.

  11. #11
    It's the axle
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    Take reviews with a grain of salt.

    First of all, everyone is looking for something different. And it's subjective. I'm strictly cross country. I like to climb. I'm not a freerider. Plus I'm also looking for a slightly more plush ride. I want a couch on rails, I was thinking yesterday while zooming down some fantastic forest trail.
    And some people are better at reviewing than others. I experience things. I don't do reviews except for the basics. I have a friend who was Gary Fischer's first bike mechanic in his shop. This guy is the master of reviews. Yet, I sense he doesn't experience like I do. I get the full picture, while he is the one who is focusing on bottom bracket height and how it affects performance.

    Riding is not an engineered study. No ride is ever the same. That's why I have a hard time reviewing tires. I'm particularly careful about not making comments on something that isn't repeatable. Therefore I only review a small facet of the set of variables. I think there is a very small number of things we can truly identify and compare. And even then, each of us only has a limited sample of trails to ride. I trust very few reviewers. And even if they are accurate, their review may not apply to my requirements.

    Derby brings up an interesting point regarding flex. And it has me rethinking some of my previous complaints about frames. There are tradeoffs. And some things that are more important can be traded off for others that are less important. One example of the things I look for is a resonant, sustained frame shimmy when I take my hands off the bars. I had the nasty surprise of discovering the 2001 NRS Air went into a horrible vibration at 20 mph when I went to grab a bottle of water and sit up and have a drink during a downhill on pavement. And since then, it has been something I look for. That has to do with the fork crown offset and the resonant frequency of the bike frame in that particular mode. Now I could get on the Mojo and slap the head tube and see if it does that, and come back with a negative review. No design is perfect. And having read Derby's post about flex, I'm coming away with a new perspective. The bottom line is- does it make you grin ear to ear. That's my review standard.

    I've got about two hours before this bike is "alive". I can't take it!

  12. #12
    mojo mofo
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    So, the only way to test a specific frame objectively, would be to have a standard set of parts (right down to the cables) and put it through the exact same trail, the exact same way. That sounds pretty impossible, even if you had the thing machine driven with tons of sensors, you'd be missing the ear to ear grin factor that Gregg was talking about.

    I suppose reviews should be about whether a certain tool is the right tool for a certain job. When a tool does the job as well as this one seems to, people can't resist giving it other jobs. Saying it isn't the best downhill bike might be like saying it doesn't open bottles well, or I can't use it to put out a forest fire. Maybe if the Swiss Army folks made a bike.

    If the bike rags spent most of their articles specifying product design criteria, no one would get to the end of the review. Or maybe all they'd have room for at the end of the write up is 'its good', or 'it blows'.

    Maybe the 'problem' is that, generally speaking, higher end bikes are getting really good so it's hard to separate them. I can think of a few friends that would pee themselves with happiness if they were able to throw a leg over a bike like the Blur or FSR S-Works on a regular basis. Plus, It wasn't that long ago that there were just mountain bikes and road bikes. Now we have XC, DH, AM, SS, FR, 29s in mountain biking alone and that makes it even more difficult. I'm actually glad that there are a few divisions, I can imagine the physio I'd need if back in 94 if I took my Kuwahara Roc D'Azur XT on half the trails I ride today. I think these are good problems for today's mountain bikers to have.

    Interesting point about the engineered flex Derby, and also D about the preconceived notions about carbon in this application. We can't have it all, although it seems that given the collective experience and attention to innovation and detail over at Ibis (and in the DW shop) we might have everything we need.

  13. #13
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    Let me be brief...

    I put in the first serious ride on the mojo yesterday in Soquel Demonstration Forrest (aka demo). (for those that don't know, demo is a place that Warren Miller would describe as 'steep and deep')

    The short story is that the Mojo is, hand's down, the best suspension MTB I've ever ridden.

    I came, most recently, off a Blur LT. I race on a blur xc (endurance racing) and have never had the heart to get rid of my original ML-7. The blur xc and ml-7 are now for sale (the BLT was sold to help finance the purchase of the Mojo).

    This bike covers all of my riding needs beautifully...except for my occasional need for the single speed...I have a customer RockLobster for that.

    Just one guy riding one place with one opinion, but I've owned and ridden nearly all the top contenders in this genre...yesterday was a mind-bending eye-opener.

    This Mojo was custom built for me, for my style, for that day, for that park, for that ride...or so it felt...it was weird.

    wow.

    mine's built with a vanilla 140 rlc, kings on 717's with conti vertical pro 2.3's, el caminos 8"f / 6" rear, Jones H-Bar with Paul's thumbies pulling an 8-speed drivetrain with xtr rapid rise old school...27 pounds that felt like 24lbs when I climbed and 30lbs when I descended...again, weird.

  14. #14
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    ... and if we just ... New to the Mojo - but awesome so far

    I just purchased a MOJO and love it. I did not want to like this bike. I had Silk Ti and still own a Ripley as my singlespeed. So I was biased toward ibis, especially when I heard IBIS was back, I was stoked, but when I saw the bike - a lot red flags went up - yikes carbon fiber -not for me. I know that is can be a better material...blah, blah, blah, but if you crash.... This was my biggest sticking point. I like to go for it. I love to hop every obstacle on the side of a trail - it is the fun part of biking. Carbon fiber would take my fun away.

    I have/had an Intense spider which was my introduction to FS. It was fun, but I wanted more travel, but not over my head travel. I still enjoy technical aspects when I ride and enjoy keeping my skills up.

    Since I had no problems with Intense, I was eyeing the 5.5. Then the 29er movement occurred- I dabbled in that for a bit. I did not like it, but I am still half in. I own a transformed Intense 69er which is a lot of fun, (and could rival the MOJO at the moment).
    The 69er only has 4 inches of travel, the big front wheel, etc aid on the trial and the singletrack, but when you get a airborne a bit and land - still only 4 inches and I was still itching for more. It still a great bike. I will continue to compare.

    I read about the bikes with ~5.5 inches of travel. I am complete bike geek and geometry nut. Everythng kept pointing to the MOJO even though I was trying to avoid it. I like the slack headtube angle and the steep seat tube angle. The geometry is prefect, it allows for perfect biking position, at least for me. I decided to test the MOJO - big mistake. I loved it. It was so fast but more suspension. I went up hill faster and downhill faset. My confidence toward the end of the weekend increased on the bike. It was everything I could ask for. The test ride allowed me to get comfortable with the idea of carbon fiber. The bike was a blast and now I own one. I swapped a lot of parts to build it up, still waiting on a few items. I did cover a lot of the frame with clear tape. I probably reduced some of it in hindsight.

    I have not written a review as I believe it takes more time to truly evaluate a bike. Also subtle changes - stems, handlebar height, pressures all change the characteristics of the bike. These are not dialed in yet - but it is a blast so far!

    BTW- I saw a previous thread about racing this bike. I could race this bike with no problem. Hand weight test - MOJO was noticeably lighter than my 26inch spider frame -never would have thought it.

  15. #15
    Downunder Mojophile
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    I have also been riding a NRS composite for a few years doing mainly XC and enduros. I looked at a number of alternatives with greater travel, including the Trance, Reign and 575. I have had the Mojo for about a month now. This was an email I sent to another forum member enquiring about initial impressions:

    I had been riding a 2005 Giant NRS composite - just under 11kgs, fast
    on XC single tracks, and great for Enduros held at Yarramundi (I did the
    NZO 12 hour on it). However, whenever it got technical especially on
    descents, I found myself losing ground to mates on the likes of Trances,
    Reigns, Stumpies, Yeti 575 and even the Rush. Same to a lesser extent on
    uphill technicals, but I always gained ground on uphill non technical
    climbs and smooth single track. I looked at the Trance, Reign and 575 to
    upgrade to. I have not ridden either the Blur LT or XC.

    I bought the Mojo on the strength of OS reviews, and specs. What
    impressed me was the geometry and the fact that a 5.5" travel bike can
    weigh in at 11.5kgs.

    The bike was built up by Dave Shuttleworth (was the owner of Norwest
    Cycles, but since that burned down, now works as a spanner man at
    Burwood Cycleworld). Bascially a SL build with Crossmax SLs, Low normal XTR
    dérailleur and Selle SLR XC geflow seat. Weighs in at 11.2kgs and I
    can't tell the difference in weight between this and the NRS. On the
    trail, the Mojo is remarkable in that it is just as fast or faster than
    the NRS on flowing singletrack and uphills. On uphill technical it
    slays it. Whereas previously you were careful with the line you pick,
    now it just climbs over everything. The Fox 140 RLC just rolls over
    anything up to a couple of feet, and anything larger than that, popping
    up the front wheel is simple. Just keep pedalling as the DW link rear
    and RP23 provides incredible traction. Climbs that were difficult and
    50/50 on the NRS, I can get up with ease on the Mojo, even in the wet.

    Descending is even better. I won't compare it to the NRS as it is a no
    contest. However the technical descent at Yarramundi (deeply rutted drop
    down to the creek from the tower of power) I've done previously on my
    brothers and mates Stumpy, Trance, Reign and a 575. I thought the Reign
    was the most composed, relaxed and the best bike for this section.
    However when I did it on the Mojo a couple of weekends back, I was
    astounded at how the Mojo handled it. It was utterly composed,
    predictable and smooth. No fuss, and the Fox was just plush. The rear
    tracked exactly where I wanted it, and it was very easy to get air in a
    controlled way. It has been some time since I rode a Reign on that
    track, and it's hard to be objective with a new bike that you just have
    spent your hard earned on; but I thought the Mojo did eveything the
    Reign did, if not more, yet it was 3kg lighter and climbed as well as a
    short travel XC rig.

    I'm 178cm and I bought the large (19") frame. I based this on the fact
    that my NRS was medium (18") and had a top tube length of 600mm, The 19"
    Mojo has the same top tube length (600mm).

  16. #16
    It's the axle
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    I just walked in from the first ride on the Mojo.

    The whole time I was thinking in terms of NRS. And here I come to the forum and see Ozelise's comments. I came away with the exact same impressions.

    The ride was logging road with up and down for a few miles, then a continuous 10% downhill for a few miles, and then a demanding narrow singletrack ledge that climbs for several miles through deep redwood forest. I did it to bed in the brakes, and to try out climbing.

    In the sunlight this frame is astounding.

    The downhill was remarkable in the seemingly surgical point and shoot control. And even the braking is noticeably better. In a word, it's confident. And it's smooth.

    The climbing is beautiful. I love this geometry. I am put off by the propedal need to flip levers. But I think I'll find a happy medium. I'm used to handlebar lockouts. By the end of the ride I had dialed in front and rear suspension. The bottom line is, when sitting, propedal isn't needed. When standing and hammering, it has to be used.

    This is real suspension. I have been in love with the NRS, but it's harsh. And it's not nearly as controlled as the Mojo.

    Now for a shower...

  17. #17
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    I'm coming off of a NRS Air too. Still to much snow to get on the local trails but a couple of things I've noticed is it's tall. It reminds me of riding a big horse. I feel a long way from the ground and I'm fine with that. The bottom bracket is higher than a railway track even when I'm sitting so a guy can pop over the rails, easy. Very stable, smooth, feels planted all the time. I'll love it more when I get my new wheels and the snow melts.
    A bicycle will take you to fantastic places....if you let it.


    Ibis fan since '08 now rolling on the big wheeled Ripley.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
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    I was lucky enough to demo a Mojo yesterday and a bit more this morning. My initial observations are in-line with GreggK and Ozelise's. I am blown away by the Mojo's ability to do everything well. On technical climbs, it allowed me to clean sections that I have had problems with in the past. On sustained fireroad climbs, I was marginally slower on the Mojo than my NRS - not bad for a bike that's at least 3lb heavier with bigger, burlier tires. And the downhills? No contest. I've been reading with great interest all the enthusiastic posts about the Mojo and the freaky thing is the bike lives up to all the hype. I can't imagine how sweet it will be when I get it dialed in. I'm going back in tomorrow to finalize the parts pick (mostly the SLX package w/ a few swaps). Woo Hoo!

    Thanks for the inspiration guys!

  19. #19
    Green Mojo
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    cchough - If you think you liked it after one ride, wait until you get about 10-20 rides in. At that point you feel like you become one with the bike. I cannot imagine going back to my Haro. The only problem is - everybody will want to ride YOUR bike. ENJOY!

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