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  1. #1
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    Mojo HDR 650B Seat Tube angle too slack for great climbing?

    I'm looking at buying the Mojo HDR 650B and all is good except the seat tube angle looks pretty slack (71?). How does this affect climbing? I know DW link bikes are great pedallers (I have one), but I'm used to a 73 degree STA. Doesn't the 71 degree angle put the rider a looong way back?

  2. #2
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    Mojo HDR 650B Seat Tube angle too slack for great climbing?

    It climbs like a mofo. Better then the HD, which has always been great.
    - -benja- -

  3. #3
    The Crow
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    Quote Originally Posted by benja55 View Post
    It climbs like a mofo. Better then the HD, which has always been great.
    I'll second that.
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  4. #4
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    All my previous bikes have been 73 deg as well. My initial feeling on my HDR 650 was too slack, but I am getting used to it more every ride. Still, if you are looking for a bike dialed for extended climbing, you may want to look for something with a steeper STA. For me anyway, a 73 deg works better for climbing.

  5. #5
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    Slide the seat forward .5 to .75" and it will be exactly like having a 73.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    ...People thought they were getting a good fork because it was a "fox".

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockinrod42 View Post
    All my previous bikes have been 73 deg as well. My initial feeling on my HDR 650 was too slack, but I am getting used to it more every ride. Still, if you are looking for a bike dialed for extended climbing, you may want to look for something with a steeper STA. For me anyway, a 73 deg works better for climbing.
    Thanks. I wonder why Ibis and Pivot go reasonably slack (71ish) and Turner goes 73? All DW in one incarnation or other..

    I saw something around about the difference between actual and effective seat tube angle. Since the Mojo has a straight, rather than curved seat post, actual=effective?

  7. #7
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    Give it a test ride. They are correct, it "climbs like a mofo". Test ride...I am 5'11" and went with a large. Theses bikes are pretty short in the cockpit so consider going up a size. I feel I could have gone XL and been ok with it. However, size L is working for me with the seat slammed back and an 85 mm stem with 750 mm bars, feels pretty good to me this way. I like the shorter wheelbase.

  8. #8
    mountain biker
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    question for you guys: I have a medium Mojo HD. I find I can barely get the balls of my feet over the axles of the pedals (when cranks are at 3 and 9 o'clock) with my seat slammed forward. I'm 5'9, with short legs (29" pant legs).

    My shop tells me that the "ball of foot over the axle of pedals" is an antiquated way of fitting a bike and not to worry about it. This seems odd to me. I suppose I could just try moving my saddle back a bit to see how my hamstrings and knees would deal with it, but I'm wondering if there's some sort of science to this.

    I'm running a 50mm stem and I love it for the DH, but on some steep punchy climbs I'm smacking my knees on the controls a bit too often... wondering if moving the saddle back would help a little.
    continuous growth is the strategy of a cancer cell.

  9. #9
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    I have a hard tail carbon 29er and will tell you, the HD gives up very, very little on climbs. In fact, it actually has a tendency to climb better in rough rutted sections over extremely steep inclines.

    If the HD-R climbs better, you will be VERY happy....

  10. #10
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    How's your reach? are you comfortable moving your saddle back?
    Theres a lot goofy fitment theories floating around these days.

    Honestly there really only one ergonomic way to fit over the pedals to limit repetitive stain injuries.

    Sounds like you may need to get a second opinion.

    I know Shimano recently released a pedal system to measure cleat placement. Not sure if those have made it into the mainstream yet but it may be worth seeking out?

    Is there any pain in your feet on longer rides of say over 25 miles or so?

  11. #11
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    Good job! Maybe the wheel size really DOES make a difference...

    Quote Originally Posted by crconsulting View Post
    ...the HD gives up very, very little on climbs.
    So true. I vividly recall my first few rides on a friend's HD, while my personal bike was an SL. It was almost shocking to me how the burlier HD really did feel like a better climber then my SL.

    Quote Originally Posted by crconsulting View Post
    If the HD-R climbs better, you will be VERY happy....
    You will be happy. It's subtle, and my HDR is new enough that it'll be a while before it's 100% dialed, but I can conclusively say already that the HDR 650b does indeed climb better then my 26" HD. And that's with losing some low gearing with the move to XX1.

    I don't like to get all wheel size fanboi, but I think the larger wheels have to be a contributing factor.
    - -benja- -

  12. #12
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    For what it's worth, before my HDR i was on a stumpjumper with a 74.5 deg. seat tube angle. That bike used a setback seatpost. With my HDR, I've been using my old command post (shimmed to fit) and despite the setback on that post and the slacker seat tube angle the HDR climbs better.

    There's more to a great climber than seat tube angle.

  13. #13
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    This advice is definitely leaning me towards XL size bike. Moving the seat forward 10mm and using a 70mm stem should give me the same TT length that I have currently and slightly steepen the SA. I'm 6' exactly, getting shorter every year

  14. #14
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    Also consider a fork with on the fly travel adjustment, if you are concerned. When it gets really steep, one of these can help a ton.

    -D

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