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Thread: Mojo HD

  1. #1
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    Mojo HD

    Has anybody spent any time on this bike aside from Brian Lopes, and written any reviews on it? This bike has a lot of potential to be my next bike, but I've never spent any time on an Ibis except a quick zip around the bike shop, and that was on a regular Mojo.

    By the way what does HD stand for? Heavy duty?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    I am waiting for the same answer..?

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    The answer to question 2 is HarD.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scepticshock
    By the way what does HD stand for? Heavy duty?

    Thanks.
    Officially, yes. Heavy Duty.

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    Personally, I think Ibis should keep the Mojo SL as is, make the standard Mojo have a longer top tube so you can run a shorter stem (since the mojo is based off of a 100mm stem the top tube is kinda short. Lengthen the wheel base just a hair, slacken the HA out to 66/67 give it a maxle rear axle, more carbon in the rear swingarm, and seat dropper cable mounts. Then have the HD as the real beefy all mountain rig.

    I'd love to have the HD but I don't really need a 160mm travel rear, I don't need a heavy 36mm fork, don't need super beef wheels etc etc. I like the lightweight of the SL and the 140mm travel feels perfect. I don't really ride places that have super chunk (like Northstar or ski lift type places) that warrant 160mm of travel (although manypeople do), and I like the flickablilty of the lighter weight SL and the efficiency of the suspension. I just wish it had a 10-15mm longer top tube, 10mm longer wheelbase, 1 degree slacker head tube and a maxle out back.

    Right now the SL is just a bit too XC'ish and the HD is too overkill.
    Last edited by Yody; 02-12-2010 at 10:42 PM.

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    sounds like a 2010 enduro...

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    The new enduro comes with a 36 front fork, 66TA, I think a tapered Headtube, and ghey FSR. Its much more on par with the HD (except for the ghey FSR part ) I want a trail bike with geometry of an AM bike, but without the extra weight, and extra travel. I want something that rips single track, whips berms, handles on rails, and is efficient pedaling, and under 30 pounds, for the most part I can float most rough stuff, 160mm is nice for certain trails/sections but I make due with 140mm. My Mojo SL right now is as close as it gets, but I could feel it could have a few more improvements without sacrificing anything.

    I'm guessing there are not enough other people who think the same way to sell a frame like that too, at least in the big picture. I'd bet most people who buy Mojo's are just doing xc riding and like the looks,carbon, extra travel, so the standard Mojo and SL are perfect for the majority of the market.

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    Your ideal bike sounds like Brandon Semenuk's part in NWD 10 where he swaps bikes for different terrain as he goes down the hill.
    The new S-Works fork should be pretty close in weight to your new fork. I don't think I would want that fork but it's light for a 160/36 fork.
    I haven't been on the new Enduro so no comment on how it rides. My only FSR reference is a non-Spec bike that stink bugged when I got on the brakes...

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    I'm sure the Enduro is pretty nice, reviews are good on it. I'm totally happy with my Ibis, guess I'm just rantin My Ibis does all the things that I stated above and does them very well at that. I was just pipe dreamin on a few minor areas that I feel could be improved upon even greater.

    Oh and I came from a stumpjumper with a Brain. It's a nice system but has absolutely nothing on a well tuned DW

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    im hoping the HD will be a complete do it all bike... i think its time to get rid of the epiphany

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    Yody, it sounds to my that your ideal mojo might have the same downsides that you noted with the 150mm travel fork on the SL.... namely, weight biased more toward the rear wheel leading to more front end "push" in fast corners and lighter feeling, wandering front end on steep climbs. Thoughts?

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    Quote Originally Posted by doismellbacon
    Yody, it sounds to my that your ideal mojo might have the same downsides that you noted with the 150mm travel fork on the SL.... namely, weight biased more toward the rear wheel leading to more front end "push" in fast corners and lighter feeling, wandering front end on steep climbs. Thoughts?
    I'm running a 150 float on my mojo and I really like it. Having the front end higher feels excellent, in flat tuens weighting the frontend takes care of any geo issues, it does wander a bit on the climbs, whatever

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    Quote Originally Posted by scepticshock
    Has anybody spent any time on this bike aside from Brian Lopes, and written any reviews on it? This bike has a lot of potential to be my next bike, but I've never spent any time on an Ibis except a quick zip around the bike shop, and that was on a regular Mojo.

    By the way what does HD stand for? Heavy duty?

    Thanks.
    Yeah, I've ridden the HD quite a bit, and it's awesome. The first thing that jumped out at me was how light the bike felt pedaling in the woods. Just riding on a normal XC ride I don't feel like the bike is holding me back in any way, and you can't say that for many 160something travel bikes. I'm running a 36T single ring up front with an LG1+ guide and 11-34 in back, HIVE 15G cranks and nothing super light yet the whole bike (with flat pedals) weighs 26 and change lbs. Not bad if you ask me. All in all I've really enjoyed the bike. I'll be continuing to work on shock tunes over the coming months so with any luck the bike is just going to get better and better. I have some ideas .

    Sorry if it's not much of a review but I hope it helps.
    dw★link
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    Also, I'll note that it feels great from a bottom out standpoint too, quite a different feel from the Mojo SL. You can really throw this bike into the terrain and it just responds with plushness and traction.
    dw★link
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    Quote Originally Posted by _dw
    Also, I'll note that it feels great from a bottom out standpoint too, quite a different feel from the Mojo SL. You can really throw this bike into the terrain and it just responds with plushness and traction.
    DW minds David Wea....

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by _dw
    Yeah, I've ridden the HD quite a bit, and it's awesome. The first thing that jumped out at me was how light the bike felt pedaling in the woods. Just riding on a normal XC ride I don't feel like the bike is holding me back in any way, and you can't say that for many 160something travel bikes. I'm running a 36T single ring up front with an LG1+ guide and 11-34 in back, HIVE 15G cranks and nothing super light yet the whole bike (with flat pedals) weighs 26 and change lbs. Not bad if you ask me. All in all I've really enjoyed the bike. I'll be continuing to work on shock tunes over the coming months so with any luck the bike is just going to get better and better. I have some ideas .

    Sorry if it's not much of a review but I hope it helps.

    Lucky....

    Now envy kicks in.... Well, I'll ride my blue SL tomorrow 34/26, 150mm, Iodines and HD pretend...

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    Let's hear the build!
    My non-SL Mojo comes in at >33lbs. If I could get down to your HDs weight plus a small ring/fd/shifter/cable/housing I would be pretty happy...

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    Dave,

    You mention that you continue to work on the shock tunes. Do you recommend the Rp23 or the Dhx5 shock for say an epic trail machine / 180 lb rider? And secondly, how will your shock tuning effect the first run factory spec. with either shock? Specifically, it took a year or more for the Fox RP23 LowC/ LowRe spec to make it to the Fox factory spec on the standard Mojo.

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    Looking for a bike possibly more versatile than my Mojo with Lyrik u-turn fork and 650b wheels, I've done parking lot tests of the HD and Firebird to get a comparison feel of steering and suspension progression. I don't have a lot of trail experience with travel over 6 inches, only the SC Nomad, Intense 6.6, Felt Compulsion, IH 6Point, a prototype 2010 Cove G-Spot, and Yeti ASR 7.

    I'm interested in a one-bike does all from long XC climbing and tight twisties through trees to desert rocky gnarl and ski park or shuttle downhills, maybe changing to DH wheels to add weight and more stability.

    The Firebird was too floppy and slow handling for what I want to ride tight twisty XC singletrack, similar to the Yeti ASR 7 in handling. The suspension felt much like the Mojo except with more deep travel in reserve for very heavy compression landings and high speed hits. With XV RP23 shocks on both bikes, the HD feels much lighter and nearly as nimble handling as I set up my Mojo with my Lyrik set at 140mm travel. With my preferred Lyrik u-turn coil it could be lowered 10 to 20mm to fine tune tight XC trail and long climbs without floppy handling. I would get the longer 2010 Lyrik lowers to be able to u-turn up to 170mm travel for ski-park riding. My 650b wheel easily fits the HD and the Firebird appears to have plenty of clearance also. Although the travel is about 1/2 inch less than the Firebird the HD feels smoother, more linear and plush. Both are very stiff frames, the Firebird probably is slightly stiffer with the same wheels. The slacker fork geometry of the Firebird should be more stable at very high speeds.

    Bottom line, the Firebird is a great heavy-duty AM/FR/DH-park bike not so good for XC. The HD the most versatile, a do-it-all XC/AM/FR/DH-park bike that should be plenty stable for expert riders at very high speeds.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    Bottom line, the Firebird is a great heavy-duty AM/FR/DH-park bike not so good for XC. The HD the most versatile, a do-it-all XC/AM/FR/DH-park bike that should be plenty stable for expert riders at very high speeds.

    derby, how was it compared to SC Nomad ?
    I own a Nomad (gen-1) which I refuse to let go coz I can't find another bike yet to suit my riding style, but Nomad is kind of too heavy to my liking for XC days (and to my 145lbs full gear weight).
    I wonder the shock tune will be lightweight-rider friendly also

    Seems I have found the one bike I always dream on.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by c-wal
    Let's hear the build!
    My non-SL Mojo comes in at >33lbs. If I could get down to your HDs weight plus a small ring/fd/shifter/cable/housing I would be pretty happy...
    I have a fix for you...I'll swap you the PUSH'd Vanilla for my PUSH'd rp23. Save yourself 1+ lb.

    BTW: Didn't ride this weekend but I'm heading to Waterdog today.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ddraewwg
    I have a fix for you...I'll swap you the PUSH'd Vanilla for my PUSH'd rp23. Save yourself 1+ lb.

    BTW: Didn't ride this weekend but I'm heading to Waterdog today.
    Yeah, it might be the coil, the 36, the flats, 2.5 DHFs (although they are SP), TA rear, GD, etc. -- but shouldn't it be lighter?

    I did an exciting ride up the peak and it's completely dry... Things will be good this weekend.

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    Quote Originally Posted by softailteamrider
    derby, how was it compared to SC Nomad ?
    I own a Nomad (gen-1) which I refuse to let go coz I can't find another bike yet to suit my riding style, but Nomad is kind of too heavy to my liking for XC days (and to my 145lbs full gear weight).
    I wonder the shock tune will be lightweight-rider friendly also

    Seems I have found the one bike I always dream on.

    How heavy is the nomad? I've been interested in this bike in a long time. Also considering the HD version, as soon as I sell my SL.

    sent from my rotary phone

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by charlesinoc
    How heavy is the nomad? I've been interested in this bike in a long time. Also considering the HD version, as soon as I sell my SL.
    My 07 Nomad is 37 lbs and some changes, but that with coil spring front and rear (Fox Van 36, DHX5), and heavy wheelset and tires 2.5" upfront, 2.35" rear. It can go down easily to 31-32 lbs by changing the wheel/tires, handle bar/stem and seatpost (I got anchorweight Spanks, and GD), crankset.
    The ride is great for me though, I will not trade this off with 09 Nomad people say the VPP2 tweaked the pedaling trait. I never had any problem with mid-stroke wallow of 07 Nomad, maybe my leightweight and DHX5 plays the role here. It's descending great, jumping awesome, uses most of the 6.5" travel (and actually I feel more than that). I only miss the lighter weight when hauling this beast on steep and long climbs and if I ride my XC epic days.

    Said that my mind is steered to the Mojo HD when looking to the spec and geo. I wouldn't mind to lose 0.5" travel for a lighter and more flickable ride. And 6" travel with less than 30 lbs..(possible?). How can I resist..?

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    Comparing a Nomad was night and day for me. I've ridden Nomads on trail, but the HD only testing on parking lot so far. Every old or new Nomad I've borrowed or demoed has been over sprung or over damped for my interests in using deep sag and full travel as a more flow style rider. I've never had a well balanced feeling from the Nomad or any VPP except the new Tracer VP although the Tracer is as flexy as all other VPP's. My Mojo with Lopes link has less flex and a more precise handling feel than any VPP up to 6.6 inch travel I've ridden including the Nomads old and new. The cornering handling frame geometry of the Nomad is very similar to the HD. The HD wheel path is a little more rearward so should coast a little easier with less hangup. And the HD is rated for use up to 180mm fork so can be much slacker for DH and FR. Pedaling DWL floats up rough rocky trail with less kickback in the granny than all but the squatiest slowest pedaling low monopivots, while the new VPP feels closer to a middle ring monopivot compared to the major kickback and nearly unridable stall in the granny of the early VPPs. In my opinion, the base Mojo's rough trail surface braking power and pedaling efficiency is the best DW has done under 7 inch travel, I have never experienced more rear brake grip than my coil sprung Mojo, only the Firebird compares closely so far. The HD braking reactivity seems similar to the base Mojo perfectly allowing moderate and stable shock rise into more complaint higher traction negative travel, not at all stiffening or easy to skid like monopivots, VPP, and very early DWL braking geometry. Since you asked, these are just my opinions looking for maximum versatility and tuning range, from very soft and squishy to quick and firm, and I exaggerate somewhat when expressing subtle differences that not all riders notice or care about. Get a test ride of the HD for yourself when available. Warning, you will be spoiled!

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    Comparing a Nomad was night and day for me........
    ......Get a test ride of the HD for yourself when available. Warning, you will be spoiled!
    derby, thanks... I can't agree more with Nomad pedal kickback in the granny esp when I am on #4 or #3 cogs and DHX Air was still on there. I guess I adjusted my pedaling habit to minimize the impact, and my light stroke and 26T ring may help a little bit. Certainly when I rode it back to back with my '04 5.7" HL Pushed 5Spot, pedal feedback was felt more obvious.
    I think the HD will be as planted and tracking the ground as well on rough surface.

    I have ridden a Mojo (and it's copycat quite extensively) and I am sold on dwL, no more test ride needed. ..
    I am ready to be spoiled..
    Ulating blencong sejatine tataraning lelaku...

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    Quote Originally Posted by hooples3
    im hoping the HD will be a complete do it all bike... i think its time to get rid of the epiphany
    Me too, ordered mine with a 2-step Lyrik for that reason.

    67deg HA extended, a hair over 69deg on 115mm - all with the flick of a switch!
    Only a couple of weeks more to wait!

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by c-wal
    Yeah, it might be the coil, the 36, the flats, 2.5 DHFs (although they are SP), TA rear, GD, etc. -- but shouldn't it be lighter?

    I did an exciting ride up the peak and it's completely dry... Things will be good this weekend.

    Dooood. It's supposed to rain this weekend.....and into next week as well. Dog was fine....although I sucked wind. Amir went to the Peak on Monday....bahsturd didn't tell me. We're heading to tahoe this weekend......amir's 40th

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    Quote Originally Posted by ddraewwg
    Dooood. It's supposed to rain this weekend.....and into next week as well. Dog was fine....although I sucked wind. Amir went to the Peak on Monday....bahsturd didn't tell me. We're heading to tahoe this weekend......amir's 40th
    I been on the road bike a lot the last couple of months, so going up wasn't too bad. I just saw the evite for Amir in my spam folder this morning... I couldn't have gone anyway though because I have to work this weekend...

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by _dw
    Yeah, I've ridden the HD quite a bit, and it's awesome. The first thing that jumped out at me was how light the bike felt pedaling in the woods.
    Hi Dave,

    have you tried pedalling performance on Mojo HD with smaller rings too? I'm interested in how it performs with 22T granny or even 20T. Would it be OK without excessive bob or is the HD designed with 32T chainring in mind?

    Thanks.

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    [QUOTE=derby] I've never had a well balanced feeling from the Nomad or any VPP except the new Tracer VP although the Tracer is as flexy as all other VPP's. My Mojo with Lopes link has less flex and a more precise handling feel than any VPP up to 6.6 inch travel I've ridden including the Nomads old and new.

    Really Derby? Are you sure? Sorry but, that's a pretty ridiculous statement. I own a Tracer and a Mojo SL. The Mojo is not stiff, Lopes link or no. The Tracer is significantly stiffer, as is a new BLT, as is a Nomad, as is a new Slopestyle.

  32. #32
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    Hi DW.
    Thanks for leaving your comments! I am also curious which rear shock you would recommend between the DHX air, RP23 and the version with the boost valve?

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    Quote Originally Posted by scepticshock
    Hi DW.
    Thanks for leaving your comments! I am also curious which rear shock you would recommend between the DHX air, RP23 and the version with the boost valve?
    Yes, I was wondering just that. At first I thought the DHX would be the best for the HD but I was thinking if the RP23XV will not match the HD's "AM Trail" nature better, and still hold up the big stuff. If Iwas ordering the HD today, I would be more inclined to get it with a RP23 than the DHX-A, but I'm waiting on some official comments on both versions and also the black color to show up to pull the trigger on the right stuff.

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    Here is what Hans from Ibis said on the subject:

    "
    In my experience there are a few different reasons people might want the DHX Air instead of the RP23.
    1. it looks more gnar-core and sends the message that you are NOT worried about the weight of your bike. That way when you beat the other guys UP the hill it's even more cool. -Or- if you are lagging on the climb you have an excuse.
    2. if they tend to destroy shocks, they seem to hold up a little better
    3. if they have a bottom out problem and want to be able to control the end of stroke without adding more main spring pressure (keeping the sag at 35% say)
    Reading the Fox website will probably give you a lot more info as well. Plus, check the MTBR reviews if you want even more...
    The stock RP23 is lighter, less expensive and works well, but the DXH has it's fans.
    Take care,
    Hans
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  35. #35
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    [QUOTE=woogie11]
    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    I've never had a well balanced feeling from the Nomad or any VPP except the new Tracer VP although the Tracer is as flexy as all other VPP's. My Mojo with Lopes link has less flex and a more precise handling feel than any VPP up to 6.6 inch travel I've ridden including the Nomads old and new.

    Really Derby? Are you sure? Sorry but, that's a pretty ridiculous statement. I own a Tracer and a Mojo SL. The Mojo is not stiff, Lopes link or no. The Tracer is significantly stiffer, as is a new BLT, as is a Nomad, as is a new Slopestyle.
    Just reporting my experience. Sounds like you may have a flexy Mojo build, mine is quite stiff, I do run a Lyrik and build my own very solid wheels. The new BLT Carbon is stiff to hand testing, stiffer than my Mojo, definitely stiffer than a Nomad. It could be every metal VPP I've tested new or used, 6.6 and under, has had weak wheels. That I cannot judge.

    Aluminum swingarms that are flexier by hand test do feel stiffer when riding, it is true. I think that the reason is carbon fiber is probably more rising rate in flex resistance. So if there is that relative difference in flex rate, small deflections have more feedback feel with metal frames, particularly aluminum, CF being more "damped" so less noticeable feedback even if stiffer to heavier side loading.

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    [QUOTE=derby]
    Quote Originally Posted by woogie11
    Just reporting my experience. Sounds like you may have a flexy Mojo build, mine is quite stiff, I do run a Lyrik and build my own very solid wheels. The new BLT Carbon is stiff to hand testing, stiffer than my Mojo, definitely stiffer than a Nomad. It could be every metal VPP I've tested new or used, 6.6 and under, has had weak wheels. That I cannot judge.

    Aluminum swingarms that are flexier by hand test do feel stiffer when riding, it is true. I think that the reason is carbon fiber is probably more rising rate in flex resistance. So if there is that relative difference in flex rate, small deflections have more feedback feel with metal frames, particularly aluminum, CF being more "damped" so less noticeable feedback even if stiffer to heavier side loading.

    I run I9 wheels with a Pike up front and a 10mm axle in the rear, the build is not the problem. I think the largest problem with the Ibis is in the linkage, the upper link is quite thin and has no bracing between the pivots. The lower linkage design has very little leverage to control the movement of the rear tri. Long story short, look at the linkage on a Pivot or a new Turner, there's a reason it's very different.
    I'm not talking about yanking on a rear tri to determine stiffness, land a jump off camber. Put your legs over the swingarm, hold tight, and yank the seat back and forth.
    With regard to "rising rate" flex resistance with CF, CF has a much higher yield strength than aluminium, so I see what you're saying but can't appreciate the context of that comment. Yes CF will initially flex more and then quickly stiffen up (typically).
    The bottom line is the Mojo linkage design is not as good as the competition and it can be easily felt. I think rear tri stiffness contributes to this as well but, linkage is the biggest problem. A little bit of rear tri flex is minute in comparison to linkage flex.
    Don't get me wrong, I really like my Mojo but, compared to my Tracer and previous 5.5 it feels like a little XC bike going downhill. I think part of that is because I believe VPP goes downhill better but, I think stiffness also plays a role...

  37. #37
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    I did some testing of the Mach 5 and new 5 Spot with my well built 650b rear wheel, Hadley hub, 28mm Blunt rim, DB spokes, to check if they would clear the bigger wheel. The Pivot barely allowed my well worn 650b x 2.3 to squeeze into the dropouts but the wheel couldn't roll freely. It was very low flex compared to my Mojo with the same wheel. And I did the same thing with a new 5 Spot, and the well worn 650b x 2.3 did roll freely and just barely cleared, but unfortunately wouldn't clear with a new tire. The flex of the 5 Spot was honestly barely less flexy hand testing than my Mojo with the same wheel, almost the same.

    If the new 5 Spot is considered stiff then the near identical flex of the Mojo with same wheel is also, particularly when considering the Mojo frame is well under a pound lighter.

    I haven't tested the Nomads or Tracer VP with the same wheel. It is possible all my demos of new medium travel VPP's and a few friends much heavier Nomads had flexier wheels than mine.

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    What sort of static flex test are you talking about? Something like flexing the stationary bike laterally by standing on one crank arm and pushing down/ sideways?

    Secondly, a little off topic. I fancy the idea of perhaps converting a 29er to 650 b but fear the bb height would be too low, along with longer chainstays. I have seen however where the actual diameter of the 650 b wheel (tire and rim) is only about 13 mm taller than 26" or 13 mm shorter than 29' (not a whole 3/4" or 19 mm), so this helps. I also like tht increased offset of the 29er forks at 45 mm (vs 38mm of 26" ) to hel with the 650 b steering. It requires a 80 mm fork 9less travel0 to achieve the same comparable 26er fork (say 100) in terms of ride height, but the taller 650 b wheel roll and absorbs better. Any thoughts?

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    What size is the white frame?


    .. this one looks the same height but little taller

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by buggymancan
    What sort of static flex test are you talking about? Something like flexing the stationary bike laterally by standing on one crank arm and pushing down/ sideways?

    Secondly, a little off topic. I fancy the idea of perhaps converting a 29er to 650 b but fear the bb height would be too low, along with longer chainstays. I have seen however where the actual diameter of the 650 b wheel (tire and rim) is only about 13 mm taller than 26" or 13 mm shorter than 29' (not a whole 3/4" or 19 mm), so this helps. I also like tht increased offset of the 29er forks at 45 mm (vs 38mm of 26" ) to hel with the 650 b steering. It requires a 80 mm fork 9less travel0 to achieve the same comparable 26er fork (say 100) in terms of ride height, but the taller 650 b wheel roll and absorbs better. Any thoughts?
    Yes, that manual flex test you mention, the Lopes Link didn't improve that lateral flex so much, it wasn't very flexy without LL. More specific to the rear is grabbing the seat post and top of rear wheel and wiggling the rear wheel sideways, this torsional flex was much improved by the Lopes Link. And and another quick controllable manual test is standing on a pedal in the granny or equal ring and cog between bikes with brakes locked and looking down at the swingarm flex as you stomp on the pedal is another, here the chain tension induced flex is a little weak with the standard Mojo but the DW-Link pedaling response is so efficient that the minor lateral flex from the granny chain pull is pretty irrelevant off road. Wheels and tires, and fork, stem, and bars are the bigger flex factors to handling.

    The HD is much stiffer in every way. Yes there are stiffer, but much heavier 6.3 inch travel bikes.

    There's some discussion in the 650b forum on starting with a 29'er going to 650b, etc. Some like using a 650b in the rear to slack handling and not loose so much BB height and pedal clearance. Some have done the front and rear down size. If you measure a "26" inch tire diameter it's usually closer to 26.5" with common 2.0 and greater tire width sizes. 650b tire diameter are very close to 27.5" in the few sizes available 2.0 to 2.3 now, 29'er close to 29". So you can see 29'er to 650b drops the axle about 3/4 inch (19mm), while 650b to "26" is 1/2 inch (13mm).

  41. #41
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    The Mojo HD with the new Fox 180 Talas will be a real killer, will be way more of a All Mountain than a trail bike but isn't that what it should be! I could easily see using that as a true dual purpose bike for DH/AM

  42. #42
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    Me too ;-)

  43. #43
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    I saw the prototye had the rear derailleru cable go through the chainstay, but the production model as far as I can tell runs long the normal route.
    I prefer the normal route as it is more quite than a cable slapping around in your chainstay - any other insights as to the move out of interest?

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wernervdmerwe
    I saw the prototye had the rear derailleru cable go through the chainstay, but the production model as far as I can tell runs long the normal route.
    I prefer the normal route as it is more quite than a cable slapping around in your chainstay - any other insights as to the move out of interest?
    We built them both ways and let them compete with each other. (Thanks to Joe at The Bike Company, Brian Lopes mechanic, for the current routing idea) The internal routing allowed the casing to get crushed by rocks under the bb, where the current routing is up and out of the way.The internal routings look cool, but there are also more issues with installation and accumulating water and mud inside the tubes.

    H
    Last edited by hanssc; 03-02-2010 at 12:05 AM.

  45. #45
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    Thanks Hans - it always amazes me the time and effort spent on what might be seen as trivial by many.
    Ibis really impresses me with the capital outlay they do in R&D before dropping the hammer to make sure that each bike is a success, not just 'fixing' bugs every year. Very gutsy as the risk is all on you guys, years before reward even start to come in!

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