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  1. #1
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    Mojo fram e sizes...

    Hi

    What frame size people have? I'm 192 cm (I guess that's 6'3" or so...) and I'm thinking about the xl, although l size might do the trick.... with stem + post

    Thanks

    Jussi

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vesuri
    Hi

    What frame size people have? I'm 192 cm (I guess that's 6'3" or so...) and I'm thinking about the xl, although l size might do the trick.... with stem + post

    Thanks

    Jussi
    http://ibiscycles.com/mountain/geome...65548d907b4605
    I'm 5'10" with 32" inseam, a non-setback post, 100mm stem, and ride a large.

  3. #3
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    I too wonder about sizing.

    I'm 5' 7 1/2" with a 31" inseam and am waiting for a small Mojo.

    A small was recommended by my LBS but I worry a medium would have been better. On paper, a .8" difference in ETT does not seem great but I am used to bikes closer to the medium's geometry. One of the folks at Ibis suggested I trust my LBS. I expect / hope that a setback seat post and a slightly long stem can provide a good fit and ride if needed.

    I will watch this thread for any small or medium riders to see how you get a good fit for your size.

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    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    I'm 5' 7 1/2" with a 31" inseam and am waiting for a small Mojo.

    A small was recommended by my LBS but I worry a medium would have been better. On paper, a .8" difference in ETT does not seem great but I am used to bikes closer to the medium's geometry. One of the folks at Ibis suggested I trust my LBS. I expect / hope that a setback seat post and a slightly long stem can provide a good fit and ride if needed.

    I will watch this thread for any small or medium riders to see how you get a good fit for your size.
    Hmmm, I'm 5'8", with 30" inseam, and ride a Med. with a 110mm stem. All my bikes have been Med. The Mojo fits really well, I've set it up with a zero setback post, and my saddle is pushed pretty far back. I'm thinking of switching to a Thomson layback to better support the saddle rails. I'm an XC/All mountain type of rider so I like a fairly efficient position, I don't like to be too upright.

    Interestingly, I've noticed on many of the Mojo pics, that riders using straight posts have their saddles pushed pretty far back.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by MJ51
    Hmmm, I'm 5'8", with 30" inseam, and ride a Med. with a 110mm stem. All my bikes have been Med. The Mojo fits really well, I've set it up with a zero setback post, and my saddle is pushed pretty far back. I'm thinking of switching to a Thomson layback to better support the saddle rails. I'm an XC/All mountain type of rider so I like a fairly efficient position, I don't like to be too upright.

    Interestingly, I've noticed on many of the Mojo pics, that riders using straight posts have their saddles pushed pretty far back.
    I'm considering ordering one also. I'm 5 ft 7 in. with a 30 in. inseam. I have a small Tracer but usually can fit the next size up in bikes also. I fit a med. Blur. I wanted to go with a medium, but I was worried about the TT length. It sounds like the medium would work for me.
    Don

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    Vesuri,

    I think that you're in XL territory.

  7. #7
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    Tall Tom, What about us smaller guys wondering about fit? Small, medium, either? Too close to call perhaps.

  8. #8
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    More sizing info...

    No Short Cuts,

    Since it is somewhat reasonable to assume that most folks reading this forum are experienced riders, I like to suggest looking at your current bike set up when determining what size to choose. If you are happy with your position on your current bike, then match the ETT(effective top tube) length and stem to a corresponding Mojo size with a 100~120mm stem.

    We designed the Mojo for all around riding conditions and using a stem length in that range helps optimize that capability. However, I recently heard an argument for the use of a shorter stem for more aggressive descending and jumping that I thought was convincing. So take into consideration your riding style.

    If I was going to make a generalization about rider heights and sizing it would go something like this:

    5'2"~5'5" = Small (15")
    5'6"~5'9" = Medium (17")
    5'10"~6'1" = Large (19")
    6'2"~6'6" = X-Large (21")

    These recommedations are far from precise, particularly if you are at the extremes of any given size range. Also, the Small can be set up to fit someone shorter than 5'2" and the X-Large can be adapted to fir some one bigger than 6'6". Regardless, I hope these guidlines are somewhat helpful.

  9. #9
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    Size guide should be helpful but I'm confused anyway...

    Thanks Tom, it is good to have this information. Your chart put's me solidly in the medium frame.

    My current bike's TT measurement is between the Mojo small and medium and that's with a 100mm stem.

    My shop said I "definitely" would be better on a small Mojo but I asked today about switching to a medium. They are willing to change to a medium but still think a small is the better fit.

    When I look closely at the numbers, it is easy to think that either a small or medium would work:

    I feel comfortable now on a bike with a 22.5" TT and a 100mm stem and setback post (actually straight post works too).

    That means a small Mojo with a 22" TT and a 110mm stem should work,
    or
    ............... a medium Mojo with a 22.8" TT and a 90mm stem.

    Both look reasonable to me. Now I must decide quick!

    Any feedback to help confuse or confirm my ideas are welcome.
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 10-27-2006 at 08:29 PM. Reason: changes and correction

  10. #10
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    bumping to show changes I made in most recent post

  11. #11
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    A shorter stem is quicker handling and better downhill and through rough technical.
    Last edited by derby; 10-29-2006 at 11:25 AM.

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    Ok - thanks for the info.

    One thing I really like about Ibis, and this forum, is that the manufacturer actually reads / replies on the issues discussed here! Talking about good customer service!... Might be happening on other manufacturer threads as well, but this is something I really appreciate.

    All the best for Ibis from, currently stormy, FInland!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    bumping to show changes I made in most recent post
    I think I would go with a MED and shorter stem. Don't buy a stem yet, let the shop loan you a few cheapies in different lengths so you can fine tune. I think you have more flexibility in set-up with the Med. On the small you will be more limited.

    Like I said above, you and I are similar in size, and I ride a MED with 110mm stem and will likely be moving to a setback post.

  14. #14
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    Fit calculators aren't helping much......

    With Tom putting me solidly on a medium (22.8"TT), and my shop solidly on a small (22"TT), and since I know I'm comfortable in the middle (22.5"TT), I tried a few fit calculators to break the tie.

    Here are some main measurements used: 31.5" inseam; 54" sternum; 67.5" height; 22" arms.

    I did my best to measure as each calculator asks and here are TT results with a 110mm stem in each case:

    Wrenchscience: 20" = small Mojo
    Zinn: 21.5" - 22.25" (intermediate - aggressive) = small Mojo
    CompetitiveCyclist: 22.4" - 22.8" = med. Mojo


    The medium would give me a shorter stem, but 100 or 110 on a small is not bad. The small would give me an easier time of dropping behind the seat on steep decents....

    So I'm driving myself mad over 0.8" of Top Tube length.
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 10-28-2006 at 11:24 PM.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by MJ51
    I think I would go with a MED and shorter stem. Don't buy a stem yet, let the shop loan you a few cheapies in different lengths so you can fine tune. I think you have more flexibility in set-up with the Med. On the small you will be more limited.

    Like I said above, you and I are similar in size, and I ride a MED with 110mm stem and will likely be moving to a setback post.
    Thanks for the input MJ51.

    It's true, we are close, but I think you have about 2" more torso length (1/2" based on taller overall height and 1.5" based on your shorter legs = longer torso). You could have longer arms as well.

    Based on what I show below (with the fit calculators) I'm close to convinced that my upper body fits in the middle of the two Mojos and would likely feel fine on either. I'm hoping.

  16. #16
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    [quote=noshortcuts]Thanks for the input MJ51.

    It's true, we are close, but I think you have about 2" more torso length (1/2" based on taller overall height and 1.5" based on your shorter legs = longer torso). You could have longer arms as well.

    Based on what I show below (with the fit calculators) I'm close to convinced that my upper body fits in the middle of the two Mojos and would likely feel fine on either. I'm hoping.[/quote

    You can also adjust using different bars. My buddies medium blur fits me, and also feels cramped compared to my small Tracer. I always use flat Ti bars, but risers come in a many different angles and lengths. He is using a carbon riser and they angle back more than my flat bars.
    Don

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    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    Thanks for the input MJ51.

    It's true, we are close, but I think you have about 2" more torso length (1/2" based on taller overall height and 1.5" based on your shorter legs = longer torso). You could have longer arms as well.

    Based on what I show below (with the fit calculators) I'm close to convinced that my upper body fits in the middle of the two Mojos and would likely feel fine on either. I'm hoping.
    I feel your pain, it is a tough decision that you have to live with for a long while. Here is a radical approach that I have taken a few times, including the Mojo. I take a digital picture of my current ride (Rocky Mountain in my case), making sure the shot is pure profile (from the side like the manufacturers do). Load the pic into a photo editor like Photoshop. Using the known wheelbase (dropout to dropout) as a way to scale the images, you can lay a photo of the Mojo over top. Doing this can help you see the relative locations of the stem, bars and seat taking into account the geometry of the frame. In photoshop, you can make the top layer (Mojo) semi-transparent so you can see through it and compare it to your current ride. There is a profile of a medium Mojo on Chuck spew from the cover of Outside, you could use that.

    It is a bit complicated, but can help make an informed decision.

  18. #18
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    might just give it a try..

    Quote Originally Posted by MJ51
    I feel your pain, it is a tough decision that you have to live with for a long while. Here is a radical approach that I have taken a few times, including the Mojo. I take a digital picture of my current ride (Rocky Mountain in my case), making sure the shot is pure profile (from the side like the manufacturers do). Load the pic into a photo editor like Photoshop. Using the known wheelbase (dropout to dropout) as a way to scale the images, you can lay a photo of the Mojo over top...............

    It is a bit complicated, but can help make an informed decision.
    then again I imagine it will end up giving me similar information........ that physically I can fit either since each Mojo is not radicly different (geometricly) from what I'm used to. If only I could photoshop a virtual ride on each size!, then once I beat them up and down a mountain once or twice I'd decide easily.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by danK
    I'm 5'10" with 32" inseam, a non-setback post, 100mm stem, and ride a large.
    DanK: We're about the same height, have about the same inseam: I thought I wanted a large, but am debating going with a medium. Right now, I ride a 19" IH Azure. (23.5" TT, 11cm stem, 0-setback post, EC70 bars) I like the way it handles--for a XC bike. The bikes are nearly identical in terms of fitment. Assuming that stability on tech sections and downhills (and combinations of the two) would be greatly enhanced with the slacker HT and 10cm stem, I'm concerned about any negative effects during steep climbing. How do you like the handling with your setup?

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    Quote Originally Posted by perioeci
    DanK: We're about the same height, have about the same inseam: I thought I wanted a large, but am debating going with a medium. Right now, I ride a 19" IH Azure. (23.5" TT, 11cm stem, 0-setback post, EC70 bars) I like the way it handles--for a XC bike. The bikes are nearly identical in terms of fitment. Assuming that stability on tech sections and downhills (and combinations of the two) would be greatly enhanced with the slacker HT and 10cm stem, I'm concerned about any negative effects during steep climbing. How do you like the handling with your setup?
    PM sent.

  21. #21
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    Note about SMALL frames and medium riders

    So, I ended up going with a small frame even though Tall Tom's guidance pointed to someone my height on a medium. I think the medium would be fine but the small is feeling so good it is hard to imagine the medium as better. The main measure is the top tube and there is only 0.8" difference between the two. I knew I fit bikes with similar geometry that are inbetween the two Mojo sizes and decided a bit smaller was likely better than a bit bigger for MY body. I am very happy with the fit.

    Anyway, here's the note for anyone above 5'7" or with an inseam over 30" who goes for a small frame:

    1. You will likely be best off with a seatpost that is 400mm length. The seat tube length on the small is short (15.5"). My inseam is 31.5" and a 367mm post is just long enough for optimal reach to the 175mm cranks. With shorter cranks, I think I would need a 400mm post.
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 11-18-2006 at 09:25 AM.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    So, I ended up going with a small frame even though Tall Tom's guidance pointed to someone my height on a medium. I think the medium would be fine but the small is feeling so good it is hard to imagine the medium as better. The main measure is the top tube and there is only 0.8" difference between the two. I knew I fit bikes with similar geometry that are inbetween the two Mojo sizes and decided a bit smaller was likely better than a bit bigger for MY body. I am very happy with the fit.

    Anyway, here's the note for anyone above 5'7" or with an inseam over 30" who goes for a small frame:

    1. You will likely be best off with a seatpost that is at least 367mm in length. The seat tube length on the small is short (15.5"). My inseam is 31.5" and a 367mm post is just long enough for optimal reach to the 175mm cranks. With shorter cranks, I think I would need a 400mm post.
    Pics? Did you end up with a seatpost with setback? I just switched to a layback post on my Med frame and it feels alot better. On the straight post I felt too "over the cranks". I know this is personal preference. I did notice that now that I have the bike really dialed in, the old rule of thumb still applies. My front axel is hidden by the bars when in normal riding position. This was a rule of thumb back in the early 90's and still seems to hold true for me today.

    If I could suggest something, go for the 400mm post. Although you might be within the insertion range specified on your current post, having so little inserted into the frame is very stressful on frames. I've cracked two AL frames at the toptube/seattube junction due to this. The longer the seat post is, inserted into the frame, the happier and stronger that frame will be.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by MJ51
    Pics? Did you end up with a seatpost with setback? I just switched to a layback post on my Med frame and it feels alot better. On the straight post I felt too "over the cranks". .........

    The longer the seat post is, inserted into the frame, the happier and stronger that frame will be.
    Here are pics while not yet finished: One carbon beauty of a Mojo coming together.... I have better pics now from my maiden voyage but not posted.

    I do have a layback and agree a 400mm would be a safer bet. With the layback and a 110mm stem and the handlebar height about 1" below the seat the bike feels perfectly fitted, balanced, and stable on all riding. By the way, the seat is not far back on the rails, so I think a straight post would also be workable for me with the seat to the rear of it's acceptable range.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    Here are pics while not yet finished: One carbon beauty of a Mojo coming together.... I have better pics now from my maiden voyage but not posted.

    I do have a layback and agree a 400mm would be a safer bet. With the layback and a 110mm stem and the handlebar height about 1" below the seat the bike feels perfectly fitted, balanced, and stable on all riding. By the way, the seat is not far back on the rails, so I think a straight post would also be workable for me with the seat to the rear of it's acceptable range.
    Looks great! Same seatpost as mine. I hate the way my Thompson looks, the "elbow" in the shaft seems to be totally contradictory to the swooping curves of the frame, but heck, it fits and it works and it will last.

    The fork... you have guts my friend. It is tough to be one of the first to drop your cash on a newer product and hope it lives up to the hype. I hope it does. It looks great on the Mojo. I took a similar leap of faith with my I9 wheelset. So far no regrets.

    Great job, now ride like you stole it.

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    New question here. Does a layback seatpost affect suspension?

    I'm still trying to determine the correct frame size for myself, and this is an issue when bike stores just can't get stock to demo. I've tracked down an owner of a Medium frame (100mm stem, straight seat post) and found it too small. Of course that could be because my current bike (an 06 Giant Reign 2) has the same top-tube size, but runs a 110mm stem with a 35mm layback post. All up that's about 1.8" longer than the standard medium Mojo. My height incidently is 176cm (I think that's 5'9" and a half).

    My question is whether or not I should aim for a medium frame and put a 110mm stem and layback seat post to match my current bike, or go for a large frame? I may in fact have to still lengthen the cockpit I feel, but I wont know until the bike comes into the LBS in about 6 weeks.
    Since the mojo comes with a straight seatpost, one might assume that the suspension and overall handling is optimized as such. Can anyone comment on this?

  26. #26
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    I run a setback post and 110mm stem

    Quote Originally Posted by jacko69
    I'm still trying to determine the correct frame size for myself, and this is an issue when bike stores just can't get stock to demo. I've tracked down an owner of a Medium frame (100mm stem, straight seat post) and found it too small. Of course that could be because my current bike (an 06 Giant Reign 2) has the same top-tube size, but runs a 110mm stem with a 35mm layback post. All up that's about 1.8" longer than the standard medium Mojo. My height incidently is 176cm (I think that's 5'9" and a half).

    My question is whether or not I should aim for a medium frame and put a 110mm stem and layback seat post to match my current bike, or go for a large frame? I may in fact have to still lengthen the cockpit I feel, but I wont know until the bike comes into the LBS in about 6 weeks.
    Since the mojo comes with a straight seatpost, one might assume that the suspension and overall handling is optimized as such. Can anyone comment on this?
    Most people made me out for a medium and I ended up going with a small. I run a set-back post and a 110 stem. It is perfect. I have not ridden a medium, but I doubt it would be "better than perfect" (but I hope to try one someday and see). By perfect I mean that the bike is balanced and planted with great traction front and back whether going up or down (including ultra steeps). Also, I am always comfortable. I never wish I had bar ends or a longer reach. It feels as if 10mm either way would still be comfortable.

    It seems you have done the numbers and came up with a similar conclusion (110mm and setback -or- one size larger). I know it is an expensive leap of faith, but with only 0.8" difference in ETT I would guess either could be set up to work well for you.

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    Hi Jacko,

    As we've discussed elsewhere, I'm 178cm and on a large frame. In the last few months of riding, I've been fine tuning the geometry. I started with a zero setback EC90 post and was quite comfortable initially. However as I got to know the Mojo and in particular what it could do on descents as opposed to my XC rig, my riding style has become more aggressive and consequently I have found my weight a little too forward. I recently changed to a 25mm setback post and have found that ideal for the riding I do now.





  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacko69
    I'm still trying to determine the correct frame size for myself, and this is an issue when bike stores just can't get stock to demo. I've tracked down an owner of a Medium frame (100mm stem, straight seat post) and found it too small. Of course that could be because my current bike (an 06 Giant Reign 2) has the same top-tube size, but runs a 110mm stem with a 35mm layback post. All up that's about 1.8" longer than the standard medium Mojo. My height incidently is 176cm (I think that's 5'9" and a half).

    My question is whether or not I should aim for a medium frame and put a 110mm stem and layback seat post to match my current bike, or go for a large frame? I may in fact have to still lengthen the cockpit I feel, but I wont know until the bike comes into the LBS in about 6 weeks.
    Since the mojo with a straight seatpost, one might assume that the suspension and overall handling is optimized as such. Can anyone comment on this?
    The 73 degree seat tube angle is optimized for seated acceleration and climbing with easy transition to stand up to pedal while climbing and accelerating. 73 degrees has long been the optimized angle for Norba XC racing for a rider of average leg dimension on a frame that doesn’t squat back when climbing (including hardtails).

    Less efficient full suspension bikes than the Mojo meant for racing or climbing use a steeper 73.5 - 74 degree seat tube angle, such as the shorter travel Ellsworth and Turner designs to compensate for the squat back and any bob not locked out by platform shocks.

    If you have extra long femur (upper leg bone) then a layback post keeps the rider in the best acceleration position.

    Also another good reason to use a set-back seat post is to ride a shorter frame or use a very short stem placing the rider in a lower more rearward weighted seated position for easier front wheel lofting up large step ups and quicker corner direction change. Mountain cross and duel slalom race bike have slack seat post angles (70 - 71 degree seat tube, with XC like 70 - 71 degree head angles) to keep weigh back and low but still turn sharply. Seated climbing and pedaling endurance efficiency suffers some in tradeoff.

    If you climb a lot try to stay with a seatpost with very little seatback for pedaling efficiency and endurance and use a frame large enough for a comfortable best fit, unless your upper leg length is extra long. For more flatland with very short climbs then a 1 – 2 inch layback post with short stem or short frame will quicken handling.

  29. #29
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    I am 5' 9" + and the medium works fine, I am using a zero seatpost and a 110 mm stem that has 5 degree raise with Monkeylite riser bars. I like the zero seatpost and longer stem for climbing.

    Specialized used to make a medium/large frame that was a great size for me. Now its small, medium, large, and x-large.

    Good info Derby.

  30. #30
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    Smile Size Matters

    Quote Originally Posted by jacko69
    I'm still trying to determine the correct frame size for myself, and this is an issue when bike stores just can't get stock to demo. I've tracked down an owner of a Medium frame (100mm stem, straight seat post) and found it too small. Of course that could be because my current bike (an 06 Giant Reign 2) has the same top-tube size, but runs a 110mm stem with a 35mm layback post. All up that's about 1.8" longer than the standard medium Mojo. My height incidently is 176cm (I think that's 5'9" and a half).

    My question is whether or not I should aim for a medium frame and put a 110mm stem and layback seat post to match my current bike, or go for a large frame? I may in fact have to still lengthen the cockpit I feel, but I wont know until the bike comes into the LBS in about 6 weeks.
    Since the mojo comes with a straight seatpost, one might assume that the suspension and overall handling is optimized as such. Can anyone comment on this?
    Hello Jacko69,

    Tom from Ibis writing. At your height I would recommend staying with the medium. If you can achieve the same position as your Reign using the 110 stem and the laid back seat post you should be fine. An offset seat post does result in a shift in the rider's weight distribution over the bike, but nothing that won't be easily corrected by your shock set-up. Your situation is not even that extreme as far as this goes. For example, I'm about 2 m and on the XL frame I've got close to 30 cm of post extension above the top of the seat tube. Since the rear center and the seat tube angle are constents regardless of frame size this means that the rear weight bias on my bike is far greater than what you would experience with 35 mm of lay back. However, the bike is incredible- even for me - once you get the sag (25%) and rebound dialed in.

    The downside to going to the large at your height is going to be that in addition to the added top tube length you're also going to get a bit more head tube length. If you're a little shorter then typical for this size that added head tube length will put you in a more upright riding position (assuming that you don't compensate through your bar and stem choices) and once again shift your weight toward the rear of the bike. This will combine with the longer front center of the large frame size and make the front end a little light. Which can be okay on steeper terrain, but lead to the front end meandering on climbs and pushing on fast twisty stuff.

    Anyway, if you have any further questions feel free to contact us directly at: info@ibiscycles.com . Thanks for choosing an Ibis!

  31. #31
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    Hi all!

    I am 189cm(6,2feet), inseam 91cm(2,99feet) and my weight is 95kg(209,5pound)
    I now ride L size frame (ESX7) from Canyon (German manufacturer). It is size 20" (seattube) effective top tube 610cm. I decided to go XL Mojo instead of L.

    I am still a little bit worried about my size choosing. I would like also hear comments from you who are about same size. I am also aware that it depends alot how you ride and where you ride. I normally ride technical roots and rocks stuff but also doing some competition xc rides in amateur series.

    I would be very grateful to hear comments!

    Thanks in advance and greetings from Finland!

    MPI

  32. #32
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    ... and if we just ... More Size Matters

    Quote Originally Posted by MPI
    Hi all!

    I am 189cm(6,2feet), inseam 91cm(2,99feet) and my weight is 95kg(209,5pound)
    I now ride L size frame (ESX7) from Canyon (German manufacturer). It is size 20" (seattube) effective top tube 610cm. I decided to go XL Mojo instead of L.

    I am still a little bit worried about my size choosing. I would like also hear comments from you who are about same size. I am also aware that it depends alot how you ride and where you ride. I normally ride technical roots and rocks stuff but also doing some competition xc rides in amateur series.

    I would be very grateful to hear comments!

    Thanks in advance and greetings from Finland!

    MPI
    Hello MPI,

    Tom from Ibis again. At your height you are kind of inbetween a large and an XL in regard to fit. I am assuming from what you wrote about your Canyon that you like the fit of that bike? If so, my question would be - what length stem are you using on that bike? 610 is a fairly long top tube for a large size frame with a 68.5 degree head tube.

    Consequently, I am going to assume that you are running a shorter stem < 100 mm. If so - and as you accurately noted - the XL may be suited to you, but we designed the Mojo with the idea that the rider would use a 100 to 120 mm stem. We were trying to make a truly all around bike and wanted to make sure that the rider's weight was well distributed over the bike so that it would handle well in a wide variety of terrain.

    Using a long top tube with a relaxed head tube angle and a short stem is a good way to go when you are mostly descending down very steep terrain. However, it has negative consequences for climbing and fast twisty but less steep descending. We chose to go with a slightly shorter top tube, the relaxed head tube angle and a suggested stem length in the 100 to 120 mm range with the idea that this would be a better all around bike.

    Not everyone will agree with us though. So if you prefer a slower steering bike, then go with the larger size (in your case the XL) and a shorter stem. If you prefer a little quicker feeling bike then I would recommend going with the large and a little longer stem.

    Hope this answers your question. If not, please feel free to contact us directly: info@ibiscycles.com.

  33. #33
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    Hi Tom and thanks for the fast answer!

    I currently have Syntace VRO adjustable stem which has 20 degrees rise and it is 110mm long. The good thing about Syntace VRO system is that it can be adjusted to so many different positions. Allthought it is not the lightest one. I also have Syntace P6 nonsetback seatpost which is set far back as it could be. My current setup climbs and descends very well. But I still want a Mojo.

  34. #34
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    Size Counts for Something

    Quote Originally Posted by MPI
    Hi Tom and thanks for the fast answer!

    I currently have Syntace VRO adjustable stem which has 20 degrees rise and it is 110mm long. The good thing about Syntace VRO system is that it can be adjusted to so many different positions. Allthought it is not the lightest one. I also have Syntace P6 nonsetback seatpost which is set far back as it could be. My current setup climbs and descends very well. But I still want a Mojo.
    Hello Again MPI,

    Glad to be of service. Well, as you have probably noted, our Large frame size is about 10 mm shorter in the top tube then your Canyon, and our XL about 10 mm longer. I would tend to point you toward the Large based our our sizing philosophy and the fact that you'd be at the very low end of the height range that I would expect to see on an XL. With the Syntace bar/stem combo you have you should be able to shift the bars forward about 10 mm and achieve the same seat post-to-bar measurement as your Canyon. In the worst case scenario you'd end up using a 120 length stem, which isn't such a bad thing with a 69 degree head tube.
    That said, I(we) tend to prefer fitting so that you feel "on top" of the bike vs "in" the bike. By that I mean that we like to give the rider most nimble set up so that it feels easy to throw the bike around. Going to the larger size will make the bike feel more stable, but it's a little like driving a truck versus a sports car. Both can be fun. It just depends upon how you choose get you kicks.
    Truly you are one of those riders who is right in the middle tof the two sizes. Hopefully with the information that I've given you and your own knowledge of your personal preferences and riding styles you will be able to make an informed choice for yourself.

  35. #35
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    Hey guys,
    this is a really interesting thread given my current dilemma. I am 5'8", but have short legs/long torso - my inseam is 29". In a hardtail I usually ride a 16"-16.5" frame. I have test ridden both the small and medium Mojo, but am having difficulty deciding. The LBS says that I'm halfway between the two.

    On a small I need a setback post and a 110mm stem and I feel quite upright
    On the medium I need a post with no set back and a 110mm stem

    Cockpit position on the medium felt good, but getting a leg over the bike was more difficult and I could not touch the ground when seated.
    The small gives me a better reach to the ground (touch toes), but the setback post puts me further back over the linkage and changes the whole feel of the bike
    Will I get more control on the small by lowering my center of gravity?

    Any advice would be great. Tall Tom - I'd really appreciate any input you have
    Thanks

    I

  36. #36
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    What your wife won't tell you

    Quote Originally Posted by DrAnt
    Hey guys,
    this is a really interesting thread given my current dilemma. I am 5'8", but have short legs/long torso - my inseam is 29". In a hardtail I usually ride a 16"-16.5" frame. I have test ridden both the small and medium Mojo, but am having difficulty deciding. The LBS says that I'm halfway between the two.

    On a small I need a setback post and a 110mm stem and I feel quite upright
    On the medium I need a post with no set back and a 110mm stem

    Cockpit position on the medium felt good, but getting a leg over the bike was more difficult and I could not touch the ground when seated.
    The small gives me a better reach to the ground (touch toes), but the setback post puts me further back over the linkage and changes the whole feel of the bike
    Will I get more control on the small by lowering my center of gravity?

    Any advice would be great. Tall Tom - I'd really appreciate any input you have
    Thanks

    I
    Hello Dr. Ant.

    Regardless of frame size your BB to saddle measurement and the BB height will be a constant whether it is a small or a medium. So the issue of being able to touch your toes to the ground while seated is not really related to the frame size. A better question might be whether the standover height on the medium is okay for you. That is, can you stand over the top tube while flat footed on the ground. This is an important consideration for emergency dismounts.
    However, at your height - and given what you said about the fit of the medium you rode - I would be surprised if you were riding a small.
    In regard to your center of gravity, the frame size will have no effect. The rider is the primary component of mass in the assebly of the rider and bicycle. Consequently the center of gravity for the vehicle falls exists near your belly button. Once again, since your saddle height and BB height are constant, the CG is constant regardless of size.

  37. #37
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    Tom,

    Thanks for the input. The medium did feel better in the cockpit. I was just a little worried about my short leg length. I think perhaps I liked the safety net of touching the ground on the small, but it sounds as though i didn't have the seat height adjusted correctly

  38. #38
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    More and More Size Matters

    Quote Originally Posted by Tall Tom
    Hello MPI,

    Tom from Ibis again. At your height you are kind of inbetween a large and an XL in regard to fit. I am assuming from what you wrote about your Canyon that you like the fit of that bike? If so, my question would be - what length stem are you using on that bike? 610 is a fairly long top tube for a large size frame with a 68.5 degree head tube.

    Consequently, I am going to assume that you are running a shorter stem < 100 mm. If so - and as you accurately noted - the XL may be suited to you, but we designed the Mojo with the idea that the rider would use a 100 to 120 mm stem. We were trying to make a truly all around bike and wanted to make sure that the rider's weight was well distributed over the bike so that it would handle well in a wide variety of terrain.

    Using a long top tube with a relaxed head tube angle and a short stem is a good way to go when you are mostly descending down very steep terrain. However, it has negative consequences for climbing and fast twisty but less steep descending. We chose to go with a slightly shorter top tube, the relaxed head tube angle and a suggested stem length in the 100 to 120 mm range with the idea that this would be a better all around bike.

    Not everyone will agree with us though. So if you prefer a slower steering bike, then go with the larger size (in your case the XL) and a shorter stem. If you prefer a little quicker feeling bike then I would recommend going with the large and a little longer stem.

    Hope this answers your question. If not, please feel free to contact us directly: info@ibiscycles.com.

    First of all, hi everyone !

    This is my first post here and my first dilemma.I just sold my XL '06 Specialized Epic Comp and I am in the market for a new bike with more potential as I realized I became a more aggressive rider. I am almost 6'5" weigh 200lbs and my inseam is around 34".I consider myself a technical trail rider that doesn't shy away from logs or jumps no more than 4'.

    I never test rode the Mojo but it seems to sport a very nice suspension design and I would
    love to get one but I am still a bit skeptical about two things: the top tube length and the bottom bracket height which seems kinda low.

    My Epic had a 25.25" long top tube with an additional 120mm stem and a straight seat post which felt pretty good for a cross country bike but not good enough for the rough.

    I just came across this thread and realized that the man from Ibis himself is taller than I am.
    So Tom , I would really be interested in hearing your opinion.I always wanted to get a bike with a longer top tube and a shorter stem (than 120mm) but cycling life seems cruel to taller guys as I always ended up with the same stem length(120mm).Is the XL Mojo with a 120mm stem going to cut it for me? How did you set up your own bike (stem length/seat post setback, crank arm length)?

    Also, how does Mojo's bottom bracket height blend with the trail's adversities?

    Any input is highly appreciated,


    Thanks,
    Raz

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Razvan
    Also, how does Mojo's bottom bracket height blend with the trail's adversities?
    The BB is low for the amount of travel it has. A lower BB (and the lower seated or standing position) is an advantage for better handling and stability for higher speeds, and for keeping the front end down when climbing, and handling tight and quick singletrack cornering. The low BB is one of the significant ingredients that makes the Mojo so fast and easy to climb. But pedal clearance is a problem occasionally when climbing a trail that is very rutted and bumpy.

    The Mojo can fit up to 2.5 tires, so you can raise the BB to almost 13.5 and gain nearly 1/2 inch more pedal clearance using the larger tires.

    I have re-adapted to the low BB after 5 years on a Tracer with 3/4 inch higher BB and less deep travel. I've set my sag to only 25% for all the climbing I do near home, although the dw-Link likes more sag even better in bumpy conditions so I can twist a couple turns out of my rear coil preload to lower the sag for downhill, but rarely do. I use my quicker than average engaging rear hub with 24 ratchets (Hope Bulb) more often now, back-pedaling before some step ups if my clearance timing is off that I used to just pedal without thought before on my familiar local loop.

    My next fork will be an adjustable height 140 - 160mm travel (probably the ’07 Nixon Elite) to extend from the 145mm stock height for more pedal clearance and slacker handling when riding mostly rocky and sandy areas such as Moab and desert conditions. Wen you order your Mojo you should consider the $500 upgrade to the Fox Talas 36 160 to be sure you have the pedal clearance you are used to when.

    You might look at the dw-Link MKiii which lists a technical trail and deep sag friendly 13.9 inch BB height with a 2.1 tire for the '07 model and frame geometry very close to the Mojo, but it has 1/2 inch less rear travel and is not really much less in price with the same build quality. And the production frame is measured by owners at 6.75 pounds with Float shock, over a pound heavier than the Mojo with the same shock weight. It should be a very durable frame. The big problem with the new MKiii is they can only fit a measured 2.25 (maybe "2.3" in some brands) max rear tire size without rub problems.

    I would like Ibis to produce a Mojo Carbon LT (Long-Travel) with near 7 inch dw-Link travel to use a 160 - 180mm fork, about 67/72 degree frame angles, easily fitting a 2.7 rear tire, with about a 14.5 inch BB height to be able to use 30% sag in rough conditions. Perhaps with some removable aluminum skid plates and frame sliders!!

    I have no regrets and appreciate the Mojo even more on every ride.

  40. #40
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    DrAnt -

    I have a similar sizing issue as my inseam is between 29' and 30" and I am about 5'7". However, I also have a bit of a neck problem and assume that an upright position would be more comfortable. I currently ride a small ibis SilkTi and have slackened out the head angle a bit, because even with a little layback, the handling was a little weird.

    Just curious what you are going to choose?

    I was even considering something like a Ventana X-5 since it has generous standover and I am starting to get tired of the top tube being so friendly. However, I dont think it compared to the Mojo. THe only thing that does appears to be the Santa Cruz blur LT, however it has an even higher top tube junction.

    b

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by shapirob
    DrAnt -

    I have a similar sizing issue as my inseam is between 29' and 30" and I am about 5'7". However, I also have a bit of a neck problem and assume that an upright position would be more comfortable. I currently ride a small ibis SilkTi and have slackened out the head angle a bit, because even with a little layback, the handling was a little weird.

    Just curious what you are going to choose?

    I was even considering something like a Ventana X-5 since it has generous standover and I am starting to get tired of the top tube being so friendly. However, I dont think it compared to the Mojo. THe only thing that does appears to be the Santa Cruz blur LT, however it has an even higher top tube junction.

    b
    I'm the same size as you and have a medium Mojo. I clear the TT by less than an inch. I don't spend much time there except when standing at a rest. The Mojo requires me to lean the bike over a little to mount. I like the size. I use a 95 mm stem and a straight post.
    Don

  42. #42
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    Don -

    Thanks for your response. Good to hear someone else negotiated this problem. I stood over a medium and I resting on the tup tube with a normal stance, if you know what I mean.

    Did you try a small?

    It seems like that might be a better solution, although its difficult to find one to ride around here. Although I do love the scultural look of the frame - I wish the mid top tube didnt rise so much. Isnt a small a little more nimble and follow Tall Tom's philosophy of fittinf to be 'on' versus 'in' the bike? Just curious of your expericne. I did just ride a friends new Large Specialized Epic and was amazed at how nice the clearance was, even though it was way to big. Those things seem laterally stiff and efficient. I wonder how they stack up to the Mojo for desert single track?

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by shapirob
    Don -

    Thanks for your response. Good to hear someone else negotiated this problem. I stood over a medium and I resting on the tup tube with a normal stance, if you know what I mean.

    Did you try a small?

    It seems like that might be a better solution, although its difficult to find one to ride around here. Although I do love the sculptural look of the frame - I wish the mid top tube didn't rise so much. Isn't a small a little more nimble and follow Tall Tom's philosophy of fitting to be 'on' versus 'in' the bike? Just curious of your experience. I did just ride a friends new Large Specialized Epic and was amazed at how nice the clearance was, even though it was way to big. Those things seem laterally stiff and efficient. I wonder how they stack up to the Mojo for desert single track?
    I did ride both a medium and a small. The small had more clearance standing over the TT with the saddle tip touching my back. In my riding shorts and shoes, I cleared the TT on the medium, so, for me that's all that mattered. I wanted something longer than my small Intense for the DH runs. The small felt like I was right up over the fork, good for climbing. I chose the medium with a Talas for the steep climbs
    Don

  44. #44
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    a 5'7" guy's frame....

    figured it always helps to have as many opinions as possible. i'm 5'7", about 155lbs and i have the Medium mojo. i had a small kona dawg deelux before this bike, and it was a bit squirly for me especially when going downhill. so i opted for the medium. when i tested the small i felt big on the bike, with the medium i feel 'in' the bike if that means anything. but i also have a more freeride angle with the bars a bit up...so i have 70mm stem with 25 degree angle, a 15mm riser bar, and a non-setback seatpost. i love this size cuz it leaves some wiggle room for me but still be within the geometry.

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