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  1. #1
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    Mojo Carbon Fork-Float or Talas?

    Those of you that already have your Mojos, I wonder if you could provide some advice about forks? Is it worth it to upgrade the Fox Float to a Talas? Do you use the travel adjust feature much? Most of the rides I do are straight up and straight down (Colorado Front Range) so I've found the Talas to be useful with other 5" travel bikes (Yeti 575). However, everyone keeps raving about how balanced the Mojo's travel already is and how well it climbs, and so I am wondering if the Talas owners are using the travel adjust feature or not. Do any of the Float owners wish they had upgraded to the Talas? I kind of like the concept of being able to adjust the effective head angle as well by winding down the fork for the tight trees. I don't get to ride really tight stuff that often but being able to change the geometry every so often is nice. What do you think? Thanks in advance for your help and comments.

  2. #2
    You know my steez...
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    Do it! Why not???

    I don't know if it's worth it or not but I placed an order for a Mojo and specd it with the Talas fork. Before I decided to buy the Ibis I considered an Ellsworth Epiphany. It was fitted with the Talas and without a doubt, the fork was the most impressive thing about the bike! I test rode the Mojo with the Float and it was ok, but thinking back on how the Talas felt convinced me to do the upgrade. Maybe I'll find that it isn't necessary as some people have suggested BUT, if I do feel the need to adjust the travel I'll be able to do it! Plus, the price difference is only $133. For that little amount it was a no brainer for me. I can't wait to get it!

  3. #3
    Trail Rider
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    Talas RLC here

    I use it for climbing only(adjust down). My medium Mojo came with a large spacer under the stem. I'm 5'7", and with the seat post in the correct position, the handlebars were higher than what I was used to(slightly higher than seat height). I tried the stem in a lower position(shifts weight forward). I like it the Mojo's handling better with a higher stem. It climbs most grades easy without adjustment. On long climbs, it's much easier to dial it down and relax in a normal seated position and climb. On steep hills, with the fork in its lowest position, I can climb anything easier, with less body positioning. On my last bike, I could dial it in for climbing, or DH handling, or compromise and set it up in the middle. With the Talas, I can set the Mojo up for excellent DH runs, and then dial it down for grades and excellent climbing. Some people don't like to mess with adjustments while riding, and there is always the chance of forgetting to put it back in the normal position. I got used to an adjustable fork and I like it!
    [size=4]Don[/size]

  4. #4
    Downunder Mojophile
    Reputation: ozelise's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quattro
    I Some people don't like to mess with adjustments while riding, and there is always the chance of forgetting to put it back in the normal position.
    That's my problem. Having had an adjustable fork, I noted 2 things:

    1. Forgetting to change the setting back (either way) while climbing or descending

    2. When climbing on my trails, they are quite technical and I encounter occasional large rocks and steps which require the 5.5" travel to negotiate. Hence I stuck with the Float RLC and have not missed the adjustability in any way.

  5. #5
    You know my steez...
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    Wink adjust it on the fly

    I can see myself forgetting to change it one way or the other, but the thing I really liked about it was how easy it is to flip the switch. I could see reaching down and changing the travel as I climb, as long as it wasn't too technical at that point. Going down is a different story but If I had to stop for second to flip the travel switch, to me it's well worth it. I just think its cool to have the option, even if I don't use it much.

  6. #6
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    I agree the Talas is worth the extra ~$100. I normally don't like tinkering with my bike while on my rides, but with the Mojo being more upright than my prior bikes (better for DH), I really like the ability to drop down the front end on climbs. And as mentioned by others, you can fairly easily flip the switch while riding. Once you get more in tune with how much travel you're running, it becomes second nature to move back and forth between more/less travel without forgetting.

    My only caveat is that if you dial it down for a technical/rocky climb, you need to take more care not to bang your pedals on rocks, since dialing down the fork also lowers your bottom bracket---and with 5.5" of travel, the pedals can get pretty low if the suspension is active. For this reason, I rarely if ever will use the lowest (100mm) travel setting on single track climbs.

    Bottom line: Worth the upgrade, though certainly not critical. But with no Talas, I would probably run my stem a little lower...sacrificing a bit on the downhills.

  7. #7
    You know my steez...
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    I really like the ability to drop down the front end on climbs. And as mentioned by others, you can fairly easily flip the switch while riding. Once you get more in tune with how much travel you're running, it becomes second nature to move back and forth between more/less travel without forgetting.

    Everything you said makes perfect sense. Please post a picture of your bike. I'm still waiting for mine to arrive at my LBS.

  8. #8
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    I got the TALAS upgrade. I use it climbing and on bitumen (you can drop the front end 4cm and be a little more efficient). Its easy to switch whilst riding on wide trails (a bit more of a challenge when in technical slimy rocks and you've forgotten to release the travel).

    I think its slightly more adjustable re lockout threshold too (I use that on climbs too). Perhaps the bottom line is it gives you more stuff to fiddle with.

    But the bottom line is its spendier, and heavier.

  9. #9
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    I found I didnt use it at all and ebayed it,The bike is very balanced and I had no trouble with the front being light.Iam an expienced rider and ride steep techy single track.
    milesW

  10. #10
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    If you have a good spin and powerful legs, she'll climb anything, no matter what fork you're running.
    A bicycle will take you to fantastic places....if you let it.


    Ibis fan since '08 now rolling on the big wheeled Ripley.

  11. #11
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    Other choices

    I tried my friend's vanilla fork and truthfully like that better due to the plushness - it just seems to match the RP23 better. I built my Mojo from the frame up and went with the Talas for the adjustability - its an '08. It is a great fork, I just need to tinker with it to see if I can get it to the plushness level of the vanilla fork. Unless you are going up crazy steep stuff the front end stays planted.

    Below 's a pic with the vanilla.

    Also if you are building one, I would highly recommnend the Nokon cables. Takes a little work to install but they are perfect for the twists and turns the cables on this bike need to make.

    -Alex



    "Nothing is free."

    Ibis Mojo / Parlee Z5 / Colnago Master Zabel / Cannondale Tandem / Civia Loring w/bamboo fenders

  12. #12
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    I installed an '07 Vanilla 140 RLC on my Mojo and love it. The black paint looks really cool and it is smoother than the Float RL it replaced. Too bad it added a 1/2 pound. I'm having some trouble getting full travel out of the Vanilla. I replaced the blue spring with the purple and the sag didn't change much even with no preload (14 mm vs 12 mm). I want to try the black spring to see what happens. I weigh about 150 and when my friends get on my bike they seem to be able to get the 25-30 mm of sag I'm looking for. I guess I need to gain weight.

  13. #13
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    revisiting the TALAS ...

    having spent more time on the bike now, and having starting more informed fiddling with the settings, I may be revising my opinion on the TALAS (at least for me).

    I live in an area with much variety of riding - from full on downhill courses to rolling Jurassic terrain and my home ride in "rooted" very tight, wet, heavily wooded fast flattish single track. I enjoy it all, though am a bit sensitive to "exposure" which makes me a bit of a downhill wuss.

    On my regular ride I have started using the 120mm setting a lot, and leaving the fork in lockout on the min. blowoff setting - it greatly reduces "dive" when on the brakes, and feels like it tightens the geometry up a bit. I switch to 140 for longer downhills. The lockout function is only sub-optimal on what I take for "stutter bumps". I shorten travel for longer and more difficult climbs too.

    BUT - if I lived in or only rode in one kind of terrain with more downhills I'd probably be very happy with the lighter and cheaper Float.

    Either way, its a fantastic bike. Next fork (in a few years) might be one of those fab looking and equally suberbly engineered Maverick upsidedowners.

  14. #14
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    Float vs. Talas

    I ended-up going with the Talas for my Mojo and I'm glad that I did. I have about 10 rides so far on the bike, and I must say that I'm using the travel adjustment a fair amount. It's not that I really feel I need it, but I must say that I do like it. The bike is extremely well-balanced in full 140mm only mode as well.

    Virtually all my rides around here (Colorado) are straight up and straight down. If you're cranking away on a half hour to an hour climb I think that it is worth it to crank it down. I too have been using mostly the 120mm travel position, although I do go for the 100mm every so often for really steep sustained climbs. I also like the effective geometry adjustment as well. I do like to drop the front end and tighten it up a bit when I am riding fast roller-coaster type trails, even if the ride doesn't have any long sustained climbs. I almost think the geometry change is more valuable than the climbing improvements. That's not to say that the stock Mojo geometry with fork set at 140mm is not fantastic already. I personally think the Mojo is by far the best steering/handling full suspension bike (and I've had many good one over the years) I've ever ridden. I think the massive tapering of the top tube, the huge head tube and downtubes, and the excellent lay-up of the carbon through-out, make the steering truly exceptional. This aspect is the hidden gem in whole Mojo package.

    In the end, I think the Talas adds a noticeable amount of adjustment/ tuning flexibility to an already exceptional frame for a small weight penalty and price. Thanks to everyone who posted their opinions on this thread. I do think you all helped me reach the right decision now that I've had my bike for a few weeks.

  15. #15
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    I too choose to put a TALAS RLC on my bike. I live in CO as well, and some of the stuff here can be really steep. Even at 120, the bike still has about a 69.5 degree head angle. This is still not too steep for most things. Right now, I don't use 100mm much, but in Crested Butte, it would be good for some of the steeps there.

    If you live in an area that doesn't have the miles and miles of climbs CO does, then the FLOAT would work great! Even with the steeps, I do see plenty of people climbing up this stuff with real long forks on slack bikes. They don't seem to mind. They just get used to it. I think from a damping and feel standpoint, I like the FLOAT better. It's got less unsprung weight and that makes things really nice.

    Either way, you can't go wrong. Both forks are great. If you want to tinker with head angles a little, the TALAS works great!

    --MXFanatic

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