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  1. #1
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    Mojo and 29er Comparisons/Contrast

    I thought you all might be interested in the post I just made on the 29er Forum and my recent decsion to order a green Mojo SL that hopefully will be here next week.

    "OK. I started the thread mentioned above on the All Mountain Forum a few days ago. I currently own a Lenz Leviathan (3" travel), Salsa Dos Niner, and a GF Rig. I like them all, but I really miss a 5- 6" travel true All Mountain 26" bike. So I have just ordered an Ibis Mojo that should be here next week. The trails are pretty rocky here on the Colorado Front Range and I just want something a lot more plush than any of the above bikes. All my rides seem to be 1500- 2000 feet straight up climbing and then straight down. I thought I would race the Dos Niner this year (sub 23 lbs.) but now it will likely be sold.

    I believe the DW suspension system of the Mojo is far superior to anything currently being offered in 29" version. I think it pedals super effeciently and is incredibly plush and stable at the same time. I did think about the new FS 29er bikes I can look forward to seeing coming out in January of 2008 (Intense 5.5 29er, GF HiFi 29er), and getting a 5" travel El Capitan and the Lenz Behemoth (way overbuilt for my weight) before making the decision to get the Mojo.

    I asked Ibis if they were going to come out with a 29er version of the Mojo and they didn't answer the question, although they did respond to all the other questions in my e-mail. As they are a very small company, I can't imagine that they could afford to pop for the carbon fiber molds for several different sizes in 29er at this early stage of the relaunch of the company. In any event, I am still toying with the idea of making a 69er Mojo.

    I was hoping that my Leviathan would be a smoother All Mountain-type option. I would say that it is a good option for smooth-to medium rocky/rooty trails and I have cleaned many technical rock sections that I haven't made with a 26" bike for a long time. However, the paltry 3 inches of travel ramps-up too quickly even while using a Fox Float shock (pre pro pedal) and the Faux-bar design bobs quite a bit. I do really like the Leviathan's realatively slack head angle (70 degrees), long wheelbase, and super light weight (5.35lbs for large frame). Devin, is a really friendly framebuilder and I think he has put a lot of soul and execeptional construction execution into his frames. I'm sure the 4" version of the Leviathan is a much better All Mountain option, but I got a killer deal on my 3" frame. Now I think the Leviathan will be the race bike (sub 25 lbs) and I'm sure I will ride it a lot, but I think the Mojo will be excellent as well--just different. The Mojo should end-up being about 25 lbs with 5.5 inches of highly efficient travel.

    Quite frankly, I recently had a chance to ride my old Yeti 575 (which I sold to a friend when I bought my first 29er 10 months ago) and I was surprised how much I liked it and how quickly I adapted back to 26" wheels.

    With the hills around here, the 29er gearing being 11.5% higher is another irritant. I feel like the "standard gearing" (22-32-44) is not right at all. I would love to have a 20-29-40 combination with an 11-34 cassette for my 29ers, but there seem to be relatively few cranks that can accomodate this set-up.

    Don't get me wrong, I do love my 29ers (especially for technical rock riding) and I think that it will continue to be more than an experiment. It feels weird to go back to a 26er after selling my last 26" bike a while ago, but I do think the Mojo is a truly exceptional bike."

  2. #2
    www.derbyrims.com
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    29'er rule standing single-speed riding. The heavier wheels and lower rolling resistance aids momentum, and the lower BB and relatively lower riding position compared to 26 wheel centers aid handling stability.

    But turn a bike downhill and raise the speed, move the same weight from the 29’er wheels to 26’er suspension and the 26’er becomes more able to handle obstacles and higher speeds. 26’ers have shorter wheelbases and lighter wheels producing more nimble handling in tight technical AM type riding. And the lower gear range of 26ers encourages seated spinning up steeper climbs.

    26’er suspension bikes are more versatile in trail uses, especially the new Mojo. 29er's do rule the singlespeed friendly trails though.

  3. #3
    It's the axle
    Reputation: Gregg K's Avatar
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    The Mojo continues to grow on me.

    I rode my first 29 inch bike last weekend. Only for a few moments. So I can't comment on anything other than that it does have a different feel. The wheels have less radius of curvature, and feel flatter.

    I know it's opening a can of worms to start this discussion. So I'll confine it to something I know as a fact. Out of the two or three facets that I hear as arguments for the larger wheels, I can say that at least one is invalid.

    About the ratio. Unless one is on a single speed, the ratio is not fixed. Bigger wheels and a downshift, and you're back at the same ratio. It's a non-issue on a geared bike.

    And the argument about the momentum of heavier wheels seems to go against my reasoning for wanting light rims and light tires. Every pedal stroke goes toward accelerating the wheel. And it's circumference, not diameter that we're accelerating. However, that may be an advantage. But most likely a disadvantage under conditions that mean most to me. Like climbing.

    One other thing that I find about the 29'er bikes that I believe is problematic is the increase in chain stay length. People may not be paying attention to that. Just something to be aware of. Take a look at the Fisher bikes and you'll see an inordinately small distance between the seat tube and the rear wheel. I think they're reluctant to lengthen the chainstays. And as a result people are sucking front derailleurs. Not to mention the mud aspect.

    Having said that, I admit that there may very well be enough advantages to the 29 inch wheels to make them superior. So I'm not taking sides as much as trying to just state the facts. I honestly think the difference is pretty small between the two wheel sizes.

  4. #4
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    I worried about buying the best new technology.....Mojo or 29er. I hope Ibis offers a trade in deal when they start building 29" Mojo's or whatever it will be called because I'm going to buy one! Awesome ride as a 26er.
    A bicycle will take you to fantastic places....if you let it.


    Ibis fan since '08 now rolling on the big wheeled Ripley.

  5. #5
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    Mojo vs. 29er

    I just got my Mojo on Friday and did my first ride yesterday. In summary, I would say that I like the Mojo much more than my 29ers. The suspension is so much more sophisticated and I feel somewhat liberated from the lousy 29er gearing. This really is a special bike. I'll post more after I've had a few more rides, but my first reaction is that I'm totally blown away by how great this bike is.

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