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Thread: The Mojo!

  1. #1
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    Ma Mojo!

    Has been in the house for a while: quite an amazing bike that built up to an almost bizzare 24+ pounds with no compromise nor silly-light components, biggish tires and 180/160 brakes (I can lift it! and I am a notorious wimp you can see a little strain in my neck despite the ultra-light weight ... sorry for the mask, a carnival left over, but I was in a silly mood ... as usual). The build is a mix of new and old (some parts go back to 1997)

    Brakes Complete Magura Marta (180/160 alu/titanium bolts) 690
    TNT Titanium BB with aluminum bolts (1998! it is going toward the tenth year! 160 grams) +
    Race Face LP 170 mm with Sugino III rings
    titanium/aluminum bolts = 705
    Rear Der Sachs (1997) alu bolts and pulleys 191
    Front Der (XT 2004 alu bolts) 126
    SRAM 850 11-32 260
    Grips (Azonic Love: heavy!) 110
    HandleBar Easton Monkeylite HR 165
    Shifters (1997 Sachs R cut and tuned alu bolts) 135
    Shifter Cables (Clarks) 110
    Stem 110 (Thomson titanium bolts) 180
    Fox Fork Float RLC 1735
    Silk Seatpost collar 15
    IS 8 + star fangled (10) + bolt (4) +spacers (6)-race crown 89
    Seat Post (Thompson masterpiece, titanium bolts) 186
    Seat (WTB Laser V) 190
    Wheels Front+Rear Garcia/WTB 1580
    Skwewers (steel non-quick release) 60
    Tires (Schwalbe Nobby Nic/Big Jimmy 2.4/2.25) 1220
    Tubes (Torelli) 260
    Total Components (gr) 8262 FRAME medium 2550 TOTAL (Kg) 10.84 (lbs) 23.87
    TOTAL with Frog Pedals (Kg) 11.06 (lbs) 24.37

    Besides the silly gram counting (add a bit more for bell and grease etc) the only built detail that is worth mentioning is the cable routing: I decided to cross the cable over the center of top tube (see photos) and then to cover all of them with a cablesock: it gives a very clean appearance and the cables follow a very ... diagonally straight path. Note that one of the cables has a thin plastic housing for protection of the rear disk hose (you never know). The back portion is continuous routing. I don't like stickers very much and I put some faux-carbon vivyl on the front fork for protection: a bit to shiny but it does serves the purpose ... it might be off if I decide to PUSH the fork (yeah! spend more money you silly!).

    A review will come some time in the future ... maybe ... the problem is how not to make it sound like a corny list of superlatives This is a bike that really does everything right, downhill or uphill I have never been on something better ...
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    Last edited by Davide; 03-27-2007 at 12:39 AM.

  2. #2
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    A few more photos

    Just a few more, with some build details. In the last note the little foam ring close to the twist shifter. It helps to be aware the transition grip/shifter and makes for less binding when shifting
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    Last edited by Davide; 03-23-2007 at 12:20 PM.

  3. #3
    Nightriding rules SuperModerator
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    looks very cool... congrats.. that sure is a light build!

  4. #4
    It's the axle
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    Haha. The mask is perfect. kokopeilli's Mojo.

    Interesting crossover of dérailleur cables.

    Those Jagwire clips are too small for the bigger brake hose. Waaa! I guess we just have to tie-wrap them. Details, details.



    Now I'm curious what my bike weighs. I find this amazing that a bike that is as light as a serious roadbike a couple of decades ago can have as more suspension travel than the first dirtbikes.

    Speaking of which, it's time to put another 20 miles of trails under my Mojo.
    Last edited by Gregg K; 03-23-2007 at 09:57 AM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregg K

    Those Jagwire clips are too small for the bigger brake hose. Waaa! I guess we just have to tie-wrap them. Details, details.
    I know!!!! very distressing - me need bigger clips

  6. #6
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    I like the carbon fiber decal wrap around the fork legs. It makes them look even lighter!

    I know you are probably the most critical of bicycle performance on MTBR. And your glowing praise of the Mojo is a strong verification of everyone else including my own praise of the Mojo who have reviewed their riding impressions here.

    The Mojo will attract the most critical high performance oriented riders and satisfy completely.

  7. #7
    flow where ever you go
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    Impressive re-cycling of parts. And still so light.

  8. #8
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    Wasn't it you that criticised the use of 130g tubes on another build? Yes it was and here's the link:

    Mojo with Maverick DUC's Vs 07 Fox Talas

    and the quote:

    "There are too many components that don't really belong on a all-mountain bike: the Maxis 310 1.95 (as somebody else have commented: useless) the ultra-light butyl, and the Stans ZTR Olimpic that are very questionable unless one is never leaving the ground."

    Now you're using the exact same weight tube on your own build and it's OK? Who said that bike was intended for All Mountain? Is yours? Is that why you use a QR front?

    No silly light components yet you use liberal amounts of Al and Ti fasteners and tune parts to shave weight? I see the huge benefit of your crank solution compared to the XTR that you so loathed. ;-)

    Once you add the missing chain from your parts list (and to your bottom line) and adjust for your 600g of additional tires, it's interesting that your bike isn't a lot lighter than the build you criticise as making so little sense. I guess the DUC32 isn't the weight pig you seem to believe considering how much effort was spent on yours to such little benefit. There appears to be only about 200g between them yet many of your components are somewhat lighter. The difference must not be in the fork.

    A quote from you later in the thread:

    "Again dont' want to start a war on a few grams, but all I am saying is that if one wants to be a weigth weenie (as the build I am commenting on is) a Fox Float (1740) + AC front hub (135 grams) + bolt on skewer (25 grams) seems lighter then the DUC ... by close to half pound"

    Aside from the fact that you really did want to start a war on a few grams and you asserted that the other build was a WW build even though it wasn't and yours is, you've now proved yourself wrong. The difference is clearly not that great.

    Finally, to quote you: "What the purpose of this build? ..."

    Yes, that build was senseless yet yours is ???

  9. #9
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    wasn't it you, who?

    never mind, I'm in tired reactionary end of week mode. Carry on.
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 03-23-2007 at 07:14 PM.

  10. #10
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    The Mask

    It is the mask that distracts ones attention from the build... who has a mask such as that just laying around at home? Do you wear the mask when you post? Do you have a sidekick? It appears to be a nice mask, of above-average quality.
    **** censorship

  11. #11
    It's the axle
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    For some reason while on an epic ride today, I kept laughing while zooming down winding singletrack, thinking about that mask.

    It reminded me of the episodes of the Honeymooners where Ed Norton and Ralph Kramden go to that Moose lodge.

    I recommend that your mask be the official Mojo mask. NORTON!

  12. #12
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    A contest?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gregg K
    For some reason while on an epic ride today, I kept laughing while zooming down winding singletrack, thinking about that mask.

    It reminded me of the episodes of the Honeymooners where Ed Norton and Ralph Kramden go to that Moose lodge.

    I recommend that your mask be the official Mojo mask. NORTON!
    Eh ... the Mask! I am glad you are getting a kick out of it! The mask was really just a Carnevale mask floating around the house. Where I come from (and in most traditionally Catholic regions) Carnival is a big holiday. Historically it was the holiday of transgression in the midddle of winter just before you started lent. It is a fun holiday where everybody (children and adults) puts on costums.

    I thought that a bit of wacko-style would go well with Ibis that has not been exactly "coorporate" traditionally (just check out Chuck Spew).

    Anyway, I second the proposal! Or maybe we should have a contest for the wackiest Mojo rider set up! (My mask might not be optimal: I am afraid the feathers might get cought in the branches )

    PS Apologies to Craigsj, I think I was a bit too hard-writing in my critique of that build. As you can tell I have nothing against light builds (I got a lot of heat on the Turner forum when I was one of the first to propose a light-weight long-travel bike). My only objection to that particular light build was that it was not light enough! I try to explain myself: if one is using Maxis 310 tires I infer that he is racing, and he is on on somewhat tame race course. If that is the case my suggestion was to shave off more weight by dropping the Maverick DUC 32 fork (that is not the lightest fork around in the 5-6" range and is not exactly getting stellar reviews http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...49#post2881949) and trying to be more careful with some of the components. 20 grams here, 30 grams there and things sum up. (More minutia Michelin used to make ultralight (90 grams) tubes that were not exactly an example of reliability. I thought these were the tubes used in that build, my mistake)
    Last edited by Davide; 03-30-2007 at 10:49 AM.

  13. #13
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    I just glad you had the foresight to wear a black mask (along with the black t-shirt and shorts) as to not detract from the displaying of the IBIS!

    Hee-he-he-he!


    Nice looking bike!

  14. #14
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    Seeing as though that build was mine, I feel qualified to comment. ;-) I couldn't post at the time because I struggled getting approval. Curiously, everyone here got to see my bike before me...

    I think it's easier to understand my build when you think of it as a starting point. I was pleased with zach and wrenchscience but they can't offer everything exactly as I want, especially when I don't know what I want til I ride it.

    The tires were selected simply because wrenchscience didn't offer any tires I wanted. It's odd that they generated so many complaints. There was never any intention to ride those. Likewise, the QR you mentioned wasn't intended for use. My rear skewer is the same as you are using. The grips were chosen to facilitate changes in bars til i found what i liked. With the DUC you are limited in stem choices so you may want to try different bars. I'm using a flat bar now.

    Yes, 90g tubes are pretty questionable. The stupid names don't help.

    It appears we have a pretty similar goals in building our bikes. You just saw mine before it was done. :-) I agree with you that mine was originally not light enough in a few ways and had not nearly enough tire. There've been some positive changes. :-) Don't interpret any of this as criticism of your parts choices, of course.

  15. #15
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    nm

    nm nm

  16. #16
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    The review

    I finally found the time to write something up: I have been on a mountain bike full suspension for 13 years and this is the best bike I ever owned (AMP B3, GT STS, Santa Cruz BLur, Turner 5-spot) or tried, it simply excells everywhere and I have not found anything to complain about in a month and a half of use .. it makes for a very boring review but here we are:

    Everybody is prising the climbing efficiency, but I first want to mention its DOWHILL performance. This is a very capable downhill machine: The DW-link glues the rear to the ground, the 5.5" of travel can take quite a lot and the geometry makes for a very stable and manageable rig. Moto-style (bars-down) turns are a pleasure, and the bike feels very tight, drawing very precise lines on the ground without any hint of flex of deflection from the chosen path. There is no brake jack.

    PLUSHNESS: you can ride this bike with minimal platform and "lower" shock pressures: the advantage is that small/medium bumps and square bumps are taken much better then with traditional systems (horst/single-pivots). It works very well on technical climbing, the suspension can really take a big deep slow-speed hit (such as a large step, roots, rock) without unsettling the bike.

    SINGLE TRACK: the bike feels very alive and flickable, I have a much better time on this bike then I used to have with my last one. Its geometry is just perfect for my style of riding and it feel very agile on anything twisty and turny. Traction is excellent, it seems to pedal up everything probably really helped by the plush suspension.

    EFFICIENCY: this bike pedals like nothing else I have owned or tried before. The advantage is very noticeable not only in extended climbs but in any situation in which you have to push hard and suddenly: uphill switchbacks, shorts burst of power to jump an obstacle, downhill out of tight turns etc.. In the saddle: At my weight (150 in Summer 155 at the end of Winter!) with the RP23-high-volume-sleeve in the non-platform position there is no bob. Standing: if I stay over/behind the saddle there is no bob, and this makes for a very efficient way to go around trail. If I get toward the front there is occasionally some bob (especially if I am cought in a tall gear) that is probably generated but the large body weight switch, it takes generally 1-2 full revolutions to get into a no-bob cadence while still standing. Switch on the platform and you can sprint the bike side by side. I almost never switch on the RP23, while I used to fidget with it all the time with my previous bike (5-spot) that was sluggish in comparison.

    BUIILD QUALITY: this is up there in the stratosphere (with Ventana, Moots, Independent). Gorgeous Carbon fiber build, anodized drop outs, beautiful seat collars (either quick release or fixed, I used the fixed), forged - CNC machined and nickel plated links that incorporate the bearings (a first: when you need bearing maintenance you need an allen key and $50 for a new set: no pressing bearings, no constant greasing and afternoon long troubles with changing bushings), down to the clean anodized aluminum eyelets

    SET UP. This is a VERY easy bike to set up, it seems to work well on relatively wide range of shock pressures. After about 3 weeks I switched to a large volume canister RP23 (a $60 mod) that increased plushness of the rear without any effect in the pedaling efficiency. This seems to be a very good compromise between the standard RP23 and the DHX Air. See: RP23 High Volume Air Sleeve

    A suggestion? Get this bike. Or if not a Mojo an Iron-Horse DW-link.

  17. #17
    Black Lion
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davide
    I finally found the time to write something up: I have been on a mountain bike full suspension for 13 years and this is the best bike I ever owned (AMP B3, GT STS, Santa Cruz BLur, Turner 5-spot) or tried, it simply excells everywhere and I have not found anything to complain about in a month and a half of use .. it makes for a very boring review but here we are:

    Everybody is prising the climbing efficiency, but I first want to mention its DOWHILL performance. This is a very capable downhill machine: The DW-link glues the rear to the ground, the 5.5" of travel can take quite a lot and the geometry makes for a very stable and manageable rig. Moto-style (bars-down) turns are a pleasure, and the bike feels very tight, drawing very precise lines on the ground without any hint of flex of deflection from the chosen path. There is no brake jack.

    PLUSHNESS: you can ride this bike with minimal platform and "lower" shock pressures: the advantage is that small/medium bumps and square bumps are taken much better then with traditional systems (horst/single-pivots). It works very well on technical climbing, the suspension can really take a big deep slow-speed hit (such as a large step, roots, rock) without unsettling the bike.

    SINGLE TRACK: the bike feels very alive and flickable, I have a much better time on this bike then I used to have with my last one. Its geometry is just perfect for my style of riding and it feel very agile on anything twisty and turny. Traction is excellent, it seems to pedal up everything probably really helped by the plush suspension.

    EFFICIENCY: this bike pedals like nothing else I have owned or tried before. The advantage is very noticeable not only in extended climbs but in any situation in which you have to push hard and suddenly: uphill switchbacks, shorts burst of power to jump an obstacle, downhill out of tight turns etc.. In the saddle: At my weight (150 in Summer 155 at the end of Winter!) with the RP23-high-volume-sleeve in the non-platform position there is no bob. Standing: if I stay over/behind the saddle there is no bob, and this makes for a very efficient way to go around trail. If I get toward the front there is occasionally some bob (especially if I am cought in a tall gear) that is probably generated but the large body weight switch, it takes generally 1-2 full revolutions to get into a no-bob cadence while still standing. Switch on the platform and you can sprint the bike side by side. I almost never switch on the RP23, while I used to fidget with it all the time with my previous bike (5-spot) that was sluggish in comparison.

    BUIILD QUALITY: this is up there in the stratosphere (with Ventana, Moots, Independent). Gorgeous Carbon fiber build, anodized drop outs, beautiful seat collars (either quick release or fixed, I used the fixed), forged - CNC machined and nickel plated links that incorporate the bearings (a first: when you need bearing maintenance you need an allen key and $50 for a new set: no pressing bearings, no constant greasing and afternoon long troubles with changing bushings), down to the clean anodized aluminum eyelets

    SET UP. This is a VERY easy bike to set up, it seems to work well on relatively wide range of shock pressures. After about 3 weeks I switched to a large volume canister RP23 (a $60 mod) that increased plushness of the rear without any effect in the pedaling efficiency. This seems to be a very good compromise between the standard RP23 and the DHX Air. See: RP23 High Volume Air Sleeve

    A suggestion? Get this bike. Or if not a Mojo an Iron-Horse DW-link.
    Very good write up.
    Your comments about how the bike can take a slow speed deep travel hit while climbing is spot on the mark. I have been on a DW-Link bike for 2 seasons now, and it continues to amaze me on rides. Once dialed the suspension just works quietly in the backround and allows the rider to focus on lines and flow.

    Greg
    Voltron

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