Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jumping Bean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    70

    Manitou Minute MRD & DT Swiss Carbon SSD vs their Fox counterparts

    Could anyone tell me how the Manitou Minute MRD & DT Swiss Carbon SSD shocks compare to their Fox equivalents? I haven't really ridden any suspension extensively that wasn't Fox. I have always liked Fox (Who doesn't?) but how does it compare to the above? Better, worse, the same? I know I should go and try them out, but I'm in the UK and it's quite difficult to track down specific bikes/parts and test them. Can anyone help me out?

    Cheers,

    JB

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    170

    The reviews so far....

    Hi Jumping Bean,

    I've been wondering the same thing, stick with my Talas 2008 or switch to Minute, RP23 Vs DHX 5.0 Air Vs DT Swiss SSD
    The following thread's already thrown some light on the DT rear shock:

    Dt Swiss SSD Carbon shock review

    As for the Forks, my friends stateside who've already had luck of testing the MRD's say they are sweet, superstiff, lighter than Fox and achieving full travel, unlike Fox unless you have a Tune/Push conversion. In UK, MBR have already had testing session on the Minute IT Absolute 140 and said that Manitou were back with a winner, 9/10 for performance and value so as a result, I've ditched the Talas and waiting for delivery of a bling set of Minute IT Absolute 140 forks.

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=21348

    And before everyone start's warning me about the unreliable IT-adjust system, which it was, Manitou have completely redesigned the system. So getting the best travel adjust system on the market, with hopefully no reliability issues, a 20 through axle for stiffness, and a 3.6lb weight (Vs 4lbs+ on the Talas).

    As for the rear shock, one other thing I would mention is that word has it that Dave Weagle (Mr dw-link) has been working with PUSH in some capacity and thinks they are close to perfecting a conversion for the RP23 to perfectly match the capabilities of the Mojo (+SL) so may be the safer way to go. Apart from which, apparently the DT shock needs parts changing every year? But it does look sooooo sweet with the naked carbon. Tough choice bro but hope this helps.

    Happy trails.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mikeyp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    46
    I received my original Mojo in early fall '06 with a Float RLC 140 and RP23. I raced XC, short track and a ton of super d's on the bike. Most of the riding I do (when not racing) involves a lot of climbing and very fast, fairly technical descending. While both Fox components worked very well over the 14 months I had them, my new Mojo SL, with the Minute MRD and DT shock, are far better performing in my opinion. The shock stroke on the DT has a much more "linear" feel to it, without any bottoming out sensation....makes the bike pedal more "actively"...again, in my opinion. The Minute MRD seems stiffer and I personally like the feel much better than the Fox. I also seem to be getting just as much, if not more travel out of this fork than I was out of the Float 140mm.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    242
    @Humdinger:

    with the new Minute IT, is it possible to expand the fork again to full travel whilst riding? I rode with someone last year who had to stop to expand the fork again, since he would have had to ride with a wheelie otherwise. That kind of killed it for me.

    Cheers
    Jever

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    170

    Good job! just lean back

    Hi,
    No stopping needed, just push the lever on the handlebars, lean back (ie take weight off front wheel) and then release the lever at the desired travel length. Ultimate in adjustability, especially versus RShox where you have to stop and continuously wind the fork down (I love the Pike BTW so not hating the fork at all!), and the Talas system where you can either very carefully lean down to the fork crown while riding (but VERY tricky) and adjust or more safely you have to stop and adjust.

    Basically to me, the only thing which stopped me getting another Manitou like the old Nixon with IT adjust was the reliability, apart from that, the forks were flawless in terms of function. Now the new minute has replaced the old Nixon as the ~140mm trail fork and has new redesigned (and hopefully reliable) IT system, stiff ride with through-axle and considerably lighter than competition @ 3.6lbs ish. It also looks sweeeet in white and red too which lets face it helps

    The IT system promised to be the ultimate hen it first launched, so hopefully it now will be, well worth a look.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    3

    ... and if we just ... Ibis Mojo Sl

    It seems like a lot of people are sold on the Mojo SL. I want to ask what owner's thoughts are as to its XC worthiness. I'm coming off S Works Epic and Scott Spark. Can it be a dual duty bike? ..Looking for a bit more suspension, fun.. and still race some XC.
    Thanks
    JB
    Last edited by Joe Burtoni; 01-30-2009 at 06:34 AM.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    3
    I had a s-works epic 08 and a currently have the mojo sl wtf and a scott spark ltd. The mojo is the slowest of the three for XC racing. A hard tail will be faster on most terrains.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: miles wadsworth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    577
    Quote Originally Posted by viclevy
    I had a s-works epic 08 and a currently have the mojo sl wtf and a scott spark ltd. The mojo is the slowest of the three for XC racing. A hard tail will be faster on most terrains.
    Thats funny, I felt like my Mojo SL was faster for CX and everything else than my 20 lb hardtail, lots more comfortable too. Really need scientific testing here.
    milesW

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    3
    SoloBici spanish MTB magazine Tested the Ht vs Full susp by a profesional rider for two laps each. Results : Giant XTC advanced SL 2009 16'22"/16'52"(hardtail)
    Giant Anthem XO 2009 17'14"/17'41"(full)
    Also Jan 09 test :Epic Carbon S-works 2009 29'00"
    Stumpjumper carbon HT 2009 28' 12"
    I guess Julien Absalon knows this too.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: miles wadsworth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    577
    Quote Originally Posted by viclevy
    SoloBici spanish MTB magazine Tested the Ht vs Full susp by a profesional rider for two laps each. Results : Giant XTC advanced SL 2009 16'22"/16'52"(hardtail)
    Giant Anthem XO 2009 17'14"/17'41"(full)
    Also Jan 09 test :Epic Carbon S-works 2009 29'00"
    Stumpjumper carbon HT 2009 28' 12"
    I guess Julien Absalon knows this too.
    Did he do the test with a power meter? These can be very subjective. I have heard of other studies that say the opposite. Tires, wheels, bikes weight and suspension set up all make a big difference.
    milesW

  11. #11
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    18,984
    Quote Originally Posted by humdinger
    Hi,
    No stopping needed, just push the lever on the handlebars, lean back (ie take weight off front wheel) and then release the lever at the desired travel length. Ultimate in adjustability, especially versus RShox where you have to stop and continuously wind the fork down (I love the Pike BTW so not hating the fork at all!), and the Talas system where you can either very carefully lean down to the fork crown while riding (but VERY tricky) and adjust or more safely you have to stop and adjust.

    Basically to me, the only thing which stopped me getting another Manitou like the old Nixon with IT adjust was the reliability, apart from that, the forks were flawless in terms of function. Now the new minute has replaced the old Nixon as the ~140mm trail fork and has new redesigned (and hopefully reliable) IT system, stiff ride with through-axle and considerably lighter than competition @ 3.6lbs ish. It also looks sweeeet in white and red too which lets face it helps

    The IT system promised to be the ultimate hen it first launched, so hopefully it now will be, well worth a look.
    I've ridden the bionicon forks with the same system, and I don't think it's quite as easy as "lean back", you are sometimes unsure if you leaned "enough" (is it really back to full extention?) as well as you have to think about this before you start the descent. It's a lot more body english and thought compared to something like ETA, but it does give you infinitely adjustable travel. The bottom line is that those systems will never be as reliable as coil forks that don't rely on lots of air-seals, but they get better every year.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  12. #12
    inner peace to make peace
    Reputation: TrailNut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,227
    Quote Originally Posted by viclevy
    I had a s-works epic 08 and a currently have the mojo sl wtf and a scott spark ltd. The mojo is the slowest of the three for XC racing. A hard tail will be faster on most terrains.
    other than the CA's Downieville XC Classic 29 mile race, I'd agree: On many the XC races in NorCal/SF Bay Area: HT's are faster on most terrains...
    The state that separates its scholars from its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards & its fighting by fools.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CarbonFiberFootprint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    79
    Quote Originally Posted by viclevy
    I had a s-works epic 08 and a currently have the mojo sl wtf and a scott spark ltd. The mojo is the slowest of the three for XC racing. A hard tail will be faster on most terrains.
    My mojo burns my too-small-for-me Mongoose hardtail

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    229
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeyp
    I received my original Mojo in early fall '06 with a Float RLC 140 and RP23. I raced XC, short track and a ton of super d's on the bike. Most of the riding I do (when not racing) involves a lot of climbing and very fast, fairly technical descending. While both Fox components worked very well over the 14 months I had them, my new Mojo SL, with the Minute MRD and DT shock, are far better performing in my opinion. The shock stroke on the DT has a much more "linear" feel to it, without any bottoming out sensation....makes the bike pedal more "actively"...again, in my opinion. The Minute MRD seems stiffer and I personally like the feel much better than the Fox. I also seem to be getting just as much, if not more travel out of this fork than I was out of the Float 140mm.
    Hey MikeYP, just curious how you have the Minute MRD setup and how much you weigh. Read alot of different opinions on these forums. Trying to dial mine in.

    Thanks!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •