Results 1 to 35 of 35
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Notcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    56

    Making a Large Mojo climb better?

    I just bought a large Mojo and really love the downhill capabilities of it, but it seems to wander when I climb steep terrain.

    Is there a way to improve this? I heard shortening your stem can help, and I currently have a 100mm stem. How short should I go to improve my climbing? What would be too short?

    I'm 5'9 with normal length arms I guess, if this helps. Thanks.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    113
    What forks are you running?

    If anything shortening the stem is going to move your weight back and make it wander more.

    Are you running excessive rear sag?

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: darty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    146
    i'm 5' 10'' and ride a medium. i would think a large would be way too big.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Notcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    56
    I have a float 140 up front, and the psi for my rear shock is ~155 ( i weigh 170). I think the sag is a little more than 25%.

    I remember reading that if you shorten the stem, it will be easier to transfer the weight up front when you need it for steep climbs. Not sure if this is true?

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,175
    Scoot your ass up on that seat, if you're already doing that, do it more to the point where you're just on the edge of the nose of the seat, shorter stem will make it worse although I prefer the shorter stem for everything else

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Notcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    56
    Yeah, it feels a little big but I couldn't pass up the deal....I've read on here that my size is sort of the cut-off between medium and large. Most people said go large for a better downhill bike, but go medium for a better climber. I guess I'm right in the middle as I like to do both. So, I'm just trying to figure out a way to make this bike fit my style better by tweaking out a few things.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,175
    Frame size shouldn't be an issue although if the Large is on the bigger side a 100mm stem seems pretty long. Nothing to do with the climbing but I'd slap a 80mm on that thing. For the climbing it sounds like a technique issue, or maybe you would be better off with a talas fork so you can slam the frontend down for steeper climbs

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,175
    Not the best pictures but this was a pretty steep climb, it almost looks like I'm standing up but really I'm WAAAY up on the nose of the seat to keep the front end from wandering around my knees are almost touching the bars on steem climbs I'm so far forward. I'm running a XL with a 70mm stem



    you can see tthe pitch of the trail better in this pic


  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ronski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    1,017
    Lower the stack height 1 spacer at a time and test ride. Lowering the stem this way should solve the problem. 100mm seems really long, and if there is much rise to that stem that could also cause a problem.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,175
    Quote Originally Posted by ronski
    Lower the stack height 1 spacer at a time and test ride. Lowering the stem this way should solve the problem. 100mm seems really long, and if there is much rise to that stem that could also cause a problem.
    Another good point

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Notcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    56
    Damn, that's straight up. Is that a So-Cal trail? Looks like you're in the Bay though...

    I might give a 70mm a try, and scoot my ass waaay up next time. Thanks

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,175
    Thats in San Luis Obispo, I am from the bay tho. Got any pics of your bike so we can see how high up your bars are?

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Notcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    56
    I'll post some this evening.

  14. #14
    Clyde
    Reputation: LuckySomer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    251

    bars

    wider bars might help as well.

  15. #15
    The MTB Lab
    Reputation: pastajet's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    2,372
    Equipment changes can help, but it comes down to technique. Butt up on the nose of the saddle, drop your elbows slightly and sort of torque down on the bars for leverage. Go ride with someone who climbs well, and ask for pointers. You will notice quickly those that have the touch, seek them out, they always like to help.

  16. #16
    bike rider
    Reputation: Lelandjt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    4,738
    ....
    Keep the Country country.

  17. #17
    bike rider
    Reputation: Lelandjt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    4,738
    If you want a bike that climbs well copy an XC bike. Low handlebar, steep headtube, 100mm fork.
    So sell your fork and buy a TALAS. A 140mm fork will never climb as well.
    I can't see how a SHORTER stem will help climbing, just the opposite cuz it will shift weight back. However, you'll love the handling after switching from a 100 to a 70mm stem. For XC races I replace my 70mm stem with a 90 for a more efficient pedaling position.
    Keep the Country country.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    284
    I'm also 5' 9ish and ride a large mojo. Like you said I could have gone either way. Been riding the large for 3 years and have had a couple of opportunities to ride a medium. Found them feeling too cramped in the cockpit. I run the talus but rarely put it down for climbs and yes the front end does wander sometimes. All I have to do is focus on good form, elbows in, sit waaay up on the saddle and lay a steady power to the pedals. After 3 years still glad I went with the large. I also took off the 100mm stem and put on a 70mm.

    Cheers,
    Straw
    Ease & Flow Where Ever I Go

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Notcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    56
    Thanks for all of the input.

    I took some pictures to show you the bike and the current configuration. Turns out the stem is 90 since I was measuring it wrong. Sounds like this is an OK length from reading other replies.

    <a href="http://s19.photobucket.com/albums/b152/jnotcher/?action=view&current=Bike018.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b152/jnotcher/Bike018.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

    <a href="http://s19.photobucket.com/albums/b152/jnotcher/?action=view&current=Bike019.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b152/jnotcher/Bike019.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

    <a href="http://s19.photobucket.com/albums/b152/jnotcher/?action=view&current=Bike020.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b152/jnotcher/Bike020.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

    On anther topic....Check out this picture of some serious chain slap. I bought this bike from a well known shop in Santa Cruz (Another Bike Shop) for a good price, and didn't get a good look at the wear from chain slap until later. I'm sure this demo was ridden hard all over the coast, but this is the only fault I can find. Can chain slap get so bad that the strength of the carbon becomes compromised? I'm getting ready to cover it up tight with an old tube and some electrical tape to prevent any further wear.

    <a href="http://s19.photobucket.com/albums/b152/jnotcher/?action=view&current=Bike021.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b152/jnotcher/Bike021.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,175
    Why is your seat so scooted back??? That looks like an issue for sure, also take a spacer or 2 from underneath the stem, thats another culprit, your bars are almost as high as the seat, thats good for comfort but not really anything else. Put that seat right around the middle of the post and grab a spacer or 2 out from underneath that stem and see how she feels. Basically the front is wandering because all of your weight is back because of the seat being adjusted so far back, and second your bars are pretty high up, both of these things make it very hard to get your weight up over that front tire to keep it from wandering on steep climbs.

    Yeah and for the chain slap, gluing a piece of innertube is what I did before going to a double with chainguide.

    Oh and if you're doing some aggressive trail riding (demo or UC) definitely try a 70mm stem, if you're just doing mellow xc stick with the 90mm.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Notcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    56
    I haven't messed with the seat since I bought the bike, but that makes sense. I'll tweak a few things and see how it goes. Also, would going from a 90 to a 70mm make that much of a difference?

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,175
    Quote Originally Posted by Notcher
    I haven't messed with the seat since I bought the bike, but that makes sense. I'll tweak a few things and see how it goes. Also, would going from a 90 to a 70mm make that much of a difference?
    Definitely scoot the seat up, a good starting point is centering the rails on the post. Dropping the bars might make you a lil more hunched over riding, but this will allow you to put your weight over the front for climbing, and also when cornering it will be easier to weight the front tire so it bites harder. The one thing you will have to do is be more conscious about dropping your weight back when jumping and downhill though.

    The 70mm stem will be very noticable, some people at first think it feels funny but you get accustomed to it, it makes the steering quicker and to me makes the bike feel better, longer stems give steering a really weird vague feel, having the bars behind the wheel axle just feels better to me. It also allows you to get your weight further back easeir for descending. Again it also makes it easier to push down on teh bars to make the front tire bite through turns.

    The one negative is that the bars will be closer to your knees which might feel weird at first (but your'e running a bigger frame anyway so prob wont' be a huge problem) and on steep climbs since your weight is further rearward you have to make more of an effort to put weight over the front tire like we discussed before.

    Stems aren't that expensive so its not too big of an investment in case you don't like it.

    start by just removing a few spacers and centering your seat, ride that for a bit, and then consider going with a shorter stem

  23. #23
    bike rider
    Reputation: Lelandjt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    4,738
    Yes a 70mm stem will feel noticeably different. Here's the solution to chainslap. Cut out pieces of innertube and attach with superglue. Besides protecting the frame it cuts down on noise.


    Keep the Country country.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    467
    I would give it several good rides after scooting your saddle position forward, before considering a shorter stem. Moving your saddle forward will shorten the reach from the saddle to the bar a reasonable amount on its own. I'd say that saddle position is most of your problem!

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    153
    I am 5'9 and ride a Large SL with a 70mm stem. No issues with climbing.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,189
    Imrpoving climbing on Mojo, or any FS bike for that matter.

    Lower front,
    Lose propedal on shock (no need for it on a mojo) as it messes up the traction
    Set up suspension front and rear correctly ( often find folk running firm forks and soft rear with pro pedal on) front then struggles, deflects on square edges, pushing centre of gravity back, and you end up lifting the front.
    Improve technique, sit further forward and put thumbs over bars (change grip) keeps front down.
    Stem choice ( and saddle position) should be made to adjust centre of gravity on the bike rather than compensate for climbing/descending in-balances. Any stem over 90mm should be avoided (IMO), unless you are really tall and struggle with bike fit, as it screws up bike balance esp descending.

    I am 5'10 and a bit run a Med Mojo with a 50mm stem and fixed height 160mm Lyriks
    The stem is a tad too short and my CG is too far back. To compensate I run low rise bars with about 10mm of spacers under the stem. I am experimenting with a 70mm stem

    CG affects not only climbing and descending but also cornering. CG too far forward and you oversteer washing out rear. CG too far back and you understeer washing front.

    When I chose my med over a large it was because I felt that the 50mm stem was as long as I felt I would go on thelarge. Therefore the medium was a better bet as I could adjust the reach both with saddle and stem adjustments. In short I could always make the med a little bigger

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rossp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    279
    Quote Originally Posted by Yody

    start by just removing a few spacers and centering your seat, ride that for a bit, and then consider going with a shorter stem
    I'm about the same height as you and also ride a Large - I did the same recently - moved the seat forward a little and dropped the stem down a few spacers - both really helped. I forget what size my stem is - maybe 70mm - I know it's not long anyway.

  28. #28
    bike rider
    Reputation: Lelandjt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    4,738
    Quote Originally Posted by nzl62
    Lose propedal on shock as it messes up the traction
    If you climb with ProPedal on it will keep the rear higher in the travel, helping to keep weight forward. Especially useful if you run 25% sag or more. It has to be REALLY bumpy for me to climb with the shock open. If the trail is particularly smooth lock-out helps even more.
    Keep the Country country.

  29. #29
    Turn off the TV
    Reputation: SMT42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    239
    Pastajet has it. Scoot forward on seat, lower elbows drive them into the ground and get low. Turning propedal on will not exactly help with traction, I like to keep it wide open so the suspension will conform to the terrain. Now just pedal your a#% off and get up the hill. My friends and I climb some serious hills here in Sonoma County and the only thing that generally stops me is lack of willpower. Short stem will give you quicker steering but do no good helping you climb. When you sit on your bike you should be able to drop a line from just under your knee cap and it should bisect the spindle on your pedal. Your seat looks like it is way to far back. Good luck.

  30. #30
    Slothful dirt hippie
    Reputation: verslowrdr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    2,740
    Quote Originally Posted by SMT42
    ...When you sit on your bike you should be able to drop a line from just under your knee cap and it should bisect the spindle on your pedal. Your seat looks like it is way to far back. Good luck.
    FWIW this can vary a lot depending on how the human is assembled. I have pretty long femurs and really crummy knees, so I have to knock the seat back on almost every bike I ride to keep the BB forward enough of the seat to not aggravate my gimp-itis. Only once that's dialed in do I start dealing with reach.
    "...Some local fiend had built it with his own three hands..."

  31. #31
    Hello
    Reputation: charlesinoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    320
    What trail is that? I used to live in Cambria and for the life of me I can't put a name to the trail. Old age?




    Quote Originally Posted by Yody
    Not the best pictures but this was a pretty steep climb, it almost looks like I'm standing up but really I'm WAAAY up on the nose of the seat to keep the front end from wandering around my knees are almost touching the bars on steem climbs I'm so far forward. I'm running a XL with a 70mm stem



    you can see tthe pitch of the trail better in this pic


    sent from my rotary phone

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,175
    Quote Originally Posted by charlesinoc
    What trail is that? I used to live in Cambria and for the life of me I can't put a name to the trail. Old age?
    It's in SLO, my buddy who took the pics is saying it was East Boundary at Montana Del Oro

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,175
    Whats up with the OP? Did any of our suggestions help?

  34. #34
    _dw
    _dw is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,269
    I'd suggest moving your seat forward, running a longer stem, and if it's comfortable for you, experiment with removing some stem spacers so you can drop your bars. Your goal should be to push your center of mass forward and lower.
    dw★link
    Split Pivot
    @daveweagle -Twitter

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: doismellbacon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2,325
    I read the OP and had lots of comments for him, but you guys have already answered them so well... such niiiiice boyyyys. This forum has been a really pleasant, helpful, wanker free place of late.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •