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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Making a Large Mojo climb better?

    I just bought a large Mojo and really love the downhill capabilities of it, but it seems to wander when I climb steep terrain.

    Is there a way to improve this? I heard shortening your stem can help, and I currently have a 100mm stem. How short should I go to improve my climbing? What would be too short?

    I'm 5'9 with normal length arms I guess, if this helps. Thanks.

  2. #2
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    What forks are you running?

    If anything shortening the stem is going to move your weight back and make it wander more.

    Are you running excessive rear sag?

  3. #3
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    i'm 5' 10'' and ride a medium. i would think a large would be way too big.

  4. #4
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    I have a float 140 up front, and the psi for my rear shock is ~155 ( i weigh 170). I think the sag is a little more than 25%.

    I remember reading that if you shorten the stem, it will be easier to transfer the weight up front when you need it for steep climbs. Not sure if this is true?

  5. #5
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    Scoot your ass up on that seat, if you're already doing that, do it more to the point where you're just on the edge of the nose of the seat, shorter stem will make it worse although I prefer the shorter stem for everything else

  6. #6
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    Yeah, it feels a little big but I couldn't pass up the deal....I've read on here that my size is sort of the cut-off between medium and large. Most people said go large for a better downhill bike, but go medium for a better climber. I guess I'm right in the middle as I like to do both. So, I'm just trying to figure out a way to make this bike fit my style better by tweaking out a few things.

  7. #7
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    Frame size shouldn't be an issue although if the Large is on the bigger side a 100mm stem seems pretty long. Nothing to do with the climbing but I'd slap a 80mm on that thing. For the climbing it sounds like a technique issue, or maybe you would be better off with a talas fork so you can slam the frontend down for steeper climbs

  8. #8
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    Not the best pictures but this was a pretty steep climb, it almost looks like I'm standing up but really I'm WAAAY up on the nose of the seat to keep the front end from wandering around my knees are almost touching the bars on steem climbs I'm so far forward. I'm running a XL with a 70mm stem



    you can see tthe pitch of the trail better in this pic


  9. #9
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    Lower the stack height 1 spacer at a time and test ride. Lowering the stem this way should solve the problem. 100mm seems really long, and if there is much rise to that stem that could also cause a problem.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronski
    Lower the stack height 1 spacer at a time and test ride. Lowering the stem this way should solve the problem. 100mm seems really long, and if there is much rise to that stem that could also cause a problem.
    Another good point

  11. #11
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    Damn, that's straight up. Is that a So-Cal trail? Looks like you're in the Bay though...

    I might give a 70mm a try, and scoot my ass waaay up next time. Thanks

  12. #12
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    Thats in San Luis Obispo, I am from the bay tho. Got any pics of your bike so we can see how high up your bars are?

  13. #13
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    I'll post some this evening.

  14. #14
    Clyde
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    bars

    wider bars might help as well.

  15. #15
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    Equipment changes can help, but it comes down to technique. Butt up on the nose of the saddle, drop your elbows slightly and sort of torque down on the bars for leverage. Go ride with someone who climbs well, and ask for pointers. You will notice quickly those that have the touch, seek them out, they always like to help.

  16. #16
    bike rider
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    ....
    Keep the Country country.

  17. #17
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    If you want a bike that climbs well copy an XC bike. Low handlebar, steep headtube, 100mm fork.
    So sell your fork and buy a TALAS. A 140mm fork will never climb as well.
    I can't see how a SHORTER stem will help climbing, just the opposite cuz it will shift weight back. However, you'll love the handling after switching from a 100 to a 70mm stem. For XC races I replace my 70mm stem with a 90 for a more efficient pedaling position.
    Keep the Country country.

  18. #18
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    I'm also 5' 9ish and ride a large mojo. Like you said I could have gone either way. Been riding the large for 3 years and have had a couple of opportunities to ride a medium. Found them feeling too cramped in the cockpit. I run the talus but rarely put it down for climbs and yes the front end does wander sometimes. All I have to do is focus on good form, elbows in, sit waaay up on the saddle and lay a steady power to the pedals. After 3 years still glad I went with the large. I also took off the 100mm stem and put on a 70mm.

    Cheers,
    Straw
    Ease & Flow Where Ever I Go

  19. #19
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    Thanks for all of the input.

    I took some pictures to show you the bike and the current configuration. Turns out the stem is 90 since I was measuring it wrong. Sounds like this is an OK length from reading other replies.

    Photobucket

    Photobucket

    Photobucket

    On anther topic....Check out this picture of some serious chain slap. I bought this bike from a well known shop in Santa Cruz (Another Bike Shop) for a good price, and didn't get a good look at the wear from chain slap until later. I'm sure this demo was ridden hard all over the coast, but this is the only fault I can find. Can chain slap get so bad that the strength of the carbon becomes compromised? I'm getting ready to cover it up tight with an old tube and some electrical tape to prevent any further wear.

    Photobucket

  20. #20
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    Why is your seat so scooted back??? That looks like an issue for sure, also take a spacer or 2 from underneath the stem, thats another culprit, your bars are almost as high as the seat, thats good for comfort but not really anything else. Put that seat right around the middle of the post and grab a spacer or 2 out from underneath that stem and see how she feels. Basically the front is wandering because all of your weight is back because of the seat being adjusted so far back, and second your bars are pretty high up, both of these things make it very hard to get your weight up over that front tire to keep it from wandering on steep climbs.

    Yeah and for the chain slap, gluing a piece of innertube is what I did before going to a double with chainguide.

    Oh and if you're doing some aggressive trail riding (demo or UC) definitely try a 70mm stem, if you're just doing mellow xc stick with the 90mm.

  21. #21
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    I haven't messed with the seat since I bought the bike, but that makes sense. I'll tweak a few things and see how it goes. Also, would going from a 90 to a 70mm make that much of a difference?

  22. #22
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Notcher
    I haven't messed with the seat since I bought the bike, but that makes sense. I'll tweak a few things and see how it goes. Also, would going from a 90 to a 70mm make that much of a difference?
    Definitely scoot the seat up, a good starting point is centering the rails on the post. Dropping the bars might make you a lil more hunched over riding, but this will allow you to put your weight over the front for climbing, and also when cornering it will be easier to weight the front tire so it bites harder. The one thing you will have to do is be more conscious about dropping your weight back when jumping and downhill though.

    The 70mm stem will be very noticable, some people at first think it feels funny but you get accustomed to it, it makes the steering quicker and to me makes the bike feel better, longer stems give steering a really weird vague feel, having the bars behind the wheel axle just feels better to me. It also allows you to get your weight further back easeir for descending. Again it also makes it easier to push down on teh bars to make the front tire bite through turns.

    The one negative is that the bars will be closer to your knees which might feel weird at first (but your'e running a bigger frame anyway so prob wont' be a huge problem) and on steep climbs since your weight is further rearward you have to make more of an effort to put weight over the front tire like we discussed before.

    Stems aren't that expensive so its not too big of an investment in case you don't like it.

    start by just removing a few spacers and centering your seat, ride that for a bit, and then consider going with a shorter stem

  23. #23
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    Yes a 70mm stem will feel noticeably different. Here's the solution to chainslap. Cut out pieces of innertube and attach with superglue. Besides protecting the frame it cuts down on noise.


    Keep the Country country.

  24. #24
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    I would give it several good rides after scooting your saddle position forward, before considering a shorter stem. Moving your saddle forward will shorten the reach from the saddle to the bar a reasonable amount on its own. I'd say that saddle position is most of your problem!

  25. #25
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    I am 5'9 and ride a Large SL with a 70mm stem. No issues with climbing.

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