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  1. #1
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    IBIS SL-R VS. the NEW Cannondale Jekyll???

    I just lost my Cannondale Rize 1 Carbon to a frame crack warranty issue. It was truly my most favorite bike of all time....
    ~ LOVE the way it climbs
    ~ LOVE the honest 23 lbs
    ~ LOVE the ride in general

    Since Cannondale no longer makes this frame, i'm assuming I would receive either the RZ One Forty 1 or possibly the New Jekyll.

    Has anyone ridden either of these bikes that could compare them to the Ibis SL-R?

    I AM ENTERTAINING THE IDEA OF SELLING WHICH EVER CANNONDALE FRAME THEY REPLACE MY BIKE WITH and buying an IBIS SL-R

    MY Concern?


    1. Weight... can I get the Ibis down to 23LBS with my old components (except for the Lefty fork and possibly the cranks)

    2. Climbing? I'm assuming it's not going to be quite the climber as my Rize, I would think it would be better than the RZ or the Jekyll though

    Here is a pick of my Rize so you can get an idea of the components I would be using moving forward


  2. #2
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    I have a yeti ASR which is a similar suspension design to what's pictured here - low single pivot with an articulated shock linkage. I also have a pivot firebird dw link bike, which (aside from weight) loses nothing to the yeti in climbing in my opinion. If you can just keep pedaling it rolls over practically anything and it doesn't feel wasteful in terms of bob. I've tested a mojo before and it feels like an excellent climber to me. I've considered replacing my asr with a mojo for xc racing. You don't exactly get a 'locked out' feel from the mojo in terms of pedaling, but having a suspension that is efficient but still compliant is what dw link is about to me, not a hardtail pedaling feel.

    Re component transfer, I know some have used the project 321 kits to use leftys on the mojo. Don't know how that affects warrantee on the mojo frame - I'd search on this board for more info. Also, I'm pretty sure the cannondale cranks will not work on the SLR due to a 30mm spindle.

  3. #3
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    Generally a DW link bike will have a lot more traction than a single pivot bike, especially when climbing steep rough stuff.

    DW bikes also have the characteristic of being able to use a lot more rear brake over rough ground as well.
    This is simply because the suspension remains fully supple.

    Why compromise, get a Mojo :-)

  4. #4
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    I wonder what the weight would be... i guess I would start with the weight of my frame and figure it out from there

  5. #5
    Ride More Work Less
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    You should be way under 23lbs w/ a Lefty on a Mojo. Several threads here about getting Lefty on a Mojo.

  6. #6
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    Yes, you could get below 23 pounds...

    According to this build and parts spec, you should get around 20.53 pounds.


    Parts Model Weights
    Frame Ibis Mojo SL-R 2250g
    Fork Cannondale Lefty 140mm 24mm axle 1175g
    Brakes XX FR 185/RR 160mm 576g/Total 576g
    Shifter XX 183.00g
    Cables Gore RideOn Cable Kit 129g
    Crank XX 175mm 42-28t 754g
    Fr Derail XX low clamp, bottom pull 34.9mm 118g
    Cassette XX 11-36t 208g
    Rr Derail XX 181g
    Chain KMC X-10SL Gold 240g
    Wheels EC90X Carbon XC mtn 15QR | 12x142mm 1285g
    Tires Schwalbe Rocket Ron UST 2.25 Front 623g
    Schwalbe Furious Fred UST 2.0 only Rear 425g
    Headset Cane Creek 110 ZS/110 tapered 145g
    Stem Easton Havon 55mm 159g
    Hdl Bar Easton Haven Carbon All mtn low rise 170g
    Grips ODI Ruffian Lock On 108g
    Seatpost Thomson Masterpiece 350mm Setback 160g
    Saddle WTB Valcon 133mmX274mm 165g
    Pedal Candy 1 262g pair
    TOTAL grams 9316.00g
    LBS 20.54

    Hope this helps.

  7. #7
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    I wonder if Ibis would warranty the frame with a lefty? The stress cracks that developed in my Rize were all were the top tube and bottom tube meets the steer tube. Hopefully they will warranty it!!!! I'm still waiting for the final word

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ollllllo
    I wonder if Ibis would warranty the frame with a lefty? The stress cracks that developed in my Rize were all were the top tube and bottom tube meets the steer tube. Hopefully they will warranty it!!!! I'm still waiting for the final word
    I know much has been written about the merits of the lefty, and I can even buy a lot of the arguments...but something about it still seems wrong to me intuitively...

    And yes, you can get the Mojo down to 23 pounds, but I don' t think it would be nearly as fun as it would be a few pounds heavier.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by getbusyliving
    And yes, you can get the Mojo down to 23 pounds, but I don' t think it would be nearly as fun as it would be a few pounds heavier.
    Getbusyliving is correct, you can get the Mojo SL-R down to 23 lbs without the lefty. I would also agree from my point of view that the ride is not as much fun. This appears to be a point that is subjective to rider preference, but thought I would share my own experience as it seem to be applicable in this situation. For reference, I would classify my personal riding preference as technical, rocky, fast, mountainous singletrack terrain with significant descents that require lots of body english. Furthermore, because I like the 100mile style endurance races, my parts need to last. Admittedly I also have a serious case of weight-weenie-itis.

    I am currently riding a Large mojo SL with a very similar build as what is quoted, but with stock XTR drivetrain, Magura Marta SL brakes, DT swiss 1250s and rear shock, and a Fox 140 RLC. This setup comes in at just under 23lbs.

    The wheels here are the interesting component to me. Recently I have played around with switching out to DT 1450s and Fulcrum Zero wheels (1600g for last year's model) and have compared times and exertion levels. To see which one is faster I have unscientifically compared time and exertion level between the DT 1250s vs. the Fulcrums (same tires and tubeless setup). To take the rider out of the equation and make the comparison more fair, I put a ceiling on how high I let my heart rate go.

    Using the lighter wheels on fast courses or long endurance rides (100 mile type) noticeably makes the day more enjoyable. Conversely, there is one ride in particular that always surprises me. It has extended technical rocky sections but is overall a fast loop with lots of climbing that takes me approximately one hour 30 minutes to ride. My pre-judgement before the comparison was that because of significant climbing, the 1250s should be faster. Surprisingly, each time I have done the comparison, my times are within one minute of each other. Exertion wise the heart rate (as per HR, not power) stays very similar, but in general I feel much more "beat up" using the lighter wheels. Subjectively, the rides on this course with the lighter wheelset are not nearly as much "fun."

    Through this comparison I noticed a very similar parallel with the weight of skis, i.e., light backcountry skis are great for getting you up the hill and skiing uniform snow conditions, but when the skier encounters mixed conditions on the lighter ski, confidence (and therefore speed) suffers.

    These points are highly subjective to my preferred riding style and speed. It appears at this point the individual rider must delve into his or her individual preference on weight weenie vs. ridability/durability as to what he or she regards as fun.

    -mike

  10. #10
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    1250g wheels? Do you weigh like nine pounds?

    I find myself breaking 1600-1800g wheels, but I ride like a hack.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by redmr2_man
    1250g wheels? Do you weigh like nine pounds?

    I find myself breaking 1600-1800g wheels, but I ride like a hack.
    Ha ha, I wish! I weigh 200# actually, but this isn't your average 1250g wheelset either. DT uses their 190s hubs laced to carbon rims. Nice solid wheel with 200# weight limit and the best part is it uses your basic steel bladed spokes and nipples. Price is seriously stupid, even on eBay, but like Keith B. used to say "Cheap, light weight, strong. Pick any two!"
    -m

  12. #12
    Too Much Fun
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    Nailed it

    Quote Originally Posted by mborduin
    Getbusyliving is correct, you can get the Mojo SL-R down to 23 lbs without the lefty. I would also agree from my point of view that the ride is not as much fun. T
    Could not agree MORE. I used to be a weight weenie, and still am to some degree. That said, IMO there is absolutely a point of diminishing returns, both in handling and in part reliability and longevity. This varies with the infinite number of variables that go with riding. Rider, rider weight, terrain, riding style etc etc.

    Should we not make trail bikes that weigh 20lbs? Of course we should. That's how we push the industry forward. Will they ride better then bikes that weigh 23-27lbs (or whatever) ? It's subjective, but I would argue that there's a point at which you really do want some mass down there and going too light can compromise the ride. For me 24-25lbs feels perfect, up and down.

    As for Cannondale, you couldn't pay me to ride one.
    - -benja- -

  13. #13
    but i want to ride now
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    First things first, get the Ibis, you won't regret it. My SL is at 24.5 and while having some weight weenie trappings, is built to handle consistent 3'+ drops, rocky chunks, and just general abuse. My Medium is built with a X0 2/10 group, Easton EC90 seatpost and bars, EA90 stem, marta SLs, Easton Havens, and a Nobby Nic 2.4 Snakeskin (F) 2.25 Double Defense (R). Right now this setup is 24.5lbs. With some ENVE or Haven carbons, lighter tires, and some XX or XTR, 23lbs becomes easily achievable with a more durable overall bike than I suspect a Cannondale would be. My .02
    sweet sweet trails

  14. #14
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    Fancy shock or no, isn't the Cannondale a single pivot still? Great engineering and whatnot, but it's still going to firm up under braking, something the DW link doesn't do.

  15. #15
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    loose the Crack-n-fail
    _______________
    1x10 IS SO FINE on my 21.9 lbs IBIS SL-R
    11-36 XTR in the rear, 36T wide-narrow upfront

  16. #16
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    New question here.

    Quote Originally Posted by biketuna
    loose the Crack-n-fail
    ????

  17. #17
    More Torque
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    Quote Originally Posted by ollllllo
    ????
    Let me attempt to translate the tuna speak:

    Crack = Can
    -n- = non
    fail = dale

    Can + non + dale = Cannondale

    -D

  18. #18
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    Crack-n-fail (Cannondale) same name
    _______________
    1x10 IS SO FINE on my 21.9 lbs IBIS SL-R
    11-36 XTR in the rear, 36T wide-narrow upfront

  19. #19
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    _______________
    1x10 IS SO FINE on my 21.9 lbs IBIS SL-R
    11-36 XTR in the rear, 36T wide-narrow upfront

  20. #20
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    really! hmmm
    did you have a cannondale frame that cracked?

  21. #21
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    my buddy did a few years back
    _______________
    1x10 IS SO FINE on my 21.9 lbs IBIS SL-R
    11-36 XTR in the rear, 36T wide-narrow upfront

  22. #22
    AKA Mr.Habanero
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    The new carbon Jekylls are freak'n sweet. Its a toughy. Both are super nice and I would love to have either.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by biketuna
    my buddy did a few years back
    Key word "a"...

    I personally would avoid the Jekyll because of that pull shock. It might be able to do all kinds of cool things, but it most likely is not easily serviced. Keep in mind that this is coming from a Cannondale guy.

  24. #24
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    watched my buddy crack one last year. Right along the made in usa part of the swingarm.

    He was coming off a 2inch drop of concrete, riding normally. He even had to laugh.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by redmr2_man
    watched my buddy crack one last year. Right along the made in usa part of the swingarm.

    He was coming off a 2inch drop of concrete, riding normally. He even had to laugh.
    What model was it and year? Just curious because in our family of 15 Cannondales, we have yet to have one crack.

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