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  1. #1
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    IBIS Ripley Reviews

    Can't wait to see some reviews of the Ripley...I've been Googling and Binging my head against the wall looking for them.

    Has anyone found one yet?

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    As far as I remember, Ibis mentioned that they were gonna release reviews at the same time at the launch. However, it seems not to be the case, and also probably very difficult to do without leaks. I am really looking forward to those ride impressions :-)

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    As far as I know, only some select dealers got to try the bike out, and outside of Wired, there wasn't any media during the Launch period. So reviews will must likely come from the lucky few customers who got the bike from the first shipment. I can't wait to try one out, but I have been in the queue for a long time, so who knows when something will be available? It will be a slow and arduous release process.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuck_tacoma View Post
    I like the comments at the end of the wired article; when you've been into bikes for so long, it is easy to forget how >99% of people perceive bicycles.

    -D

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    I had a good laugh at that too. If only owning one of these expensive bikes made me "uber-wealthy" and a "Trail riding professional". One can dream, right?

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    Why Wired, of all media, to get the exclusive look?

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    I asked the same thing when Wired was asked to come to Press Camp (they have a Dealer and Press Camp in Deer Valley every June that many vendors come to), and the company that runs the camps said:

    "We have had Wired, Outside Magazine, Pop Science and other large name non-endemics over the years. These have been consistently requested by our customers as a strategy to breakout of the typical inner circles we tend to exist in."

    I can't answer for Ibis, just what I was told for Press Camp. Again, as far as I know, except for Bike Magazine who got to see it a few weeks before the launch, no media got to see anything except Wired, and the media and customer base all got the same exact information and at the same exact time.

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    Makes sense, thanks for the details.

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    I've got a buddy who works in a pretty big shop in LA who was in Santa Cruz in the last few weeks. He rode the Ripley for 2 days and he loved it. I ran into him on the trail today so I only had a few minutes to talk to him about it. He's getting the Ripley and selling off his other rides. He said it was that good.

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  12. #12
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    You had me at Rip...

    I'll provide this, only slightly-informed review: (if you're looking for a ride review, skip this post...as I haven't ridden it).

    I, too, saw the Ripley at Trailhead cyclery (in San Jose)...best bike shop you'll ever have the pleasure of dealing with. I'm a long-time Ibis rider...I still have a Szazbo from Gen 1 Ibis...I don't ride it anymore, but I'm keeping it. I had one of the first new Mojo's to come out...a couple SL's, and SL-R, and currently spend most of my riding time on my all-time favorite bike to date...an HD. (and yes, I've ridden non-Ibis bikes...too many list...in the last couple years I have owned / spent a good bit of time on S-works Enduro, Nomad C, S-works Epic 29, Tallboy LTc...and the trusty oldies...Rocklobster SS, 96 Race lite, Sycip tandem). I've always been a fan of Ibis because of the way they've treated me as a customer and their ability to continuously exceed my expectations with their bikes). I'm not a 29er-or-nothing guy....nor am I 26-or-die guy. I've been riding and loving 650b since Kirk P spun some of his first tires...and I still dig 650b.

    So...I've followed all the speculation on the Ripley...eagerly anticipating the bike's arrival. But wasn't 'sold' until I saw it in person. Engineering marvel? yes. Do I believe it's going to be one of those ride-for-hours-and-get-lost (emotionally and, maybe physically) in-the-big-trees-of-santa-cruz bikes? yes. the 'category' of the bike? I stopped caring about categories many moons ago. But I'm, typically, a pretty prudent guy...wait and see, hear the reviews...work out the kinks...

    BUT, I walked into the shop...I saw it...large, not medium like I need...black / green, not blue like I'd want...and I committed, on the spot, to buy one. It is beautiful in person...more beautiful than in the pictures. It's better-designed in person...more so than in the diagrams. It's really emotionally compelling. At least, to me. I just sold the SL-R to help fund it...anyone looking for a lighty-used Tallboy LTc? ;-)
    Last edited by riderup; 04-05-2013 at 03:24 PM. Reason: forgot something

  13. #13
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    As an long time Ibis owner and current HD rider, I can't wait to try the Ripley.

  14. #14
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    Riderup, I'm selling my Porsche to buy a Ripley.


    What's amazing to me is that at this date in biking the number of big changes that are being made. Between the Ripley, Industry Nine's new design, and XX1, I am finding enthusiasm like never before.
    Note to self: 85% of FTP for 20 min.

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    Does anybody actually own this bike? The only reviews I have seen are from people that have demo'ed the bike for 30 minutes, people that say their LBS has their bike, or people that do a write up letting people know that they have seen one and placed an order for it. Wasn't the Ripley supposed to be released with several reviews/write-ups? The bike has been out for 3 weeks and nobody that owns one has written a review. Can we get some feedback here? And preferably not stating how wonderful the color is or what an engineering marvel it is. Thanks.

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    Maybe the owners are too busy riding it to have time to write it up.

  17. #17
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    Mine is coming in Thursday, I'll report back

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    Note to self: 85% of FTP for 20 min.

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    Too bad they didn't have the opportunity of riding a 140mm fork Ripley, because it sounds like that combo would beat out the 429 as an overall trail bike...

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    Anyone over 6'3" give me thoughts on sizing? I had a XL mojo a few years but the HD in XL was too small

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnzj View Post
    Too bad they didn't have the opportunity of riding a 140mm fork Ripley, because it sounds like that combo would beat out the 429 as an overall trail bike...
    Yes, it probably would.

    While they tested both bikes with the same 120mm travel fork, the Pivot is basically a 100mm bike that likes being "over-forked" to 120mm. Likewise, the Ripley would gain stability, chunkability, and downhill chops @ 140mm. It's not too hard to imagine how they'd stack up for riding gnarly terrain if the Ripley had a 34x140 fork with the resulting slacker-than-Pivot head angle and an extra 20mm of travel on both ends.

    What a nice ( 1st World ) problem to have, picking between those bikes. I've ridden the 429c and three different 429 alu's and they were all phenomenal bikes....

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by tws_andrew View Post
    Anyone over 6'3" give me thoughts on sizing? I had a XL mojo a few years but the HD in XL was too small
    There's a dedicated thread/threads addressing size....thanks.

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    For me that's a promising review, as I am looking for a XC climb smasher to go with my HD.

    Some of what was said doesn't surprise me. I found, coming off my previous bike, that I had to get used how high the HD sat up. Now I don't even notice it. Sounds like the Ripley may be the same?

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  25. #25
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    Good point, hopefully someone will report on a 140 Ripley...

    It definitely would be interesting to try the Ripley with the longer fork. I've added longer forks to past bikes with mixed results — it can make everything sit up too high for overall riding — but nothing approaching the Ripley's other assets (or 29er config). Hopefully someone can report back soon. AGREE choosing b/t these bikes is the kind of problem you love to have.


    Quote Originally Posted by doismellbacon View Post
    Yes, it probably would.

    While they tested both bikes with the same 120mm travel fork, the Pivot is basically a 100mm bike that likes being "over-forked" to 120mm. Likewise, the Ripley would gain stability, chunkability, and downhill chops @ 140mm. It's not too hard to imagine how they'd stack up for riding gnarly terrain if the Ripley had a 34x140 fork with the resulting slacker-than-Pivot head angle and an extra 20mm of travel on both ends.

    What a nice ( 1st World ) problem to have, picking between those bikes. I've ridden the 429c and three different 429 alu's and they were all phenomenal bikes....
    All bike, all the time

  26. #26
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    IBIS Ripley Reviews

    The bike intelligencer review has no value apart from giving their subjective impression of a short test ride of two bikes without proper setup. Gives me very little and sounds like the Ripley was set up too hard.


    simenf - brainwashed by the big wheel mafia.

  27. #27
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    IBIS Ripley Reviews

    On second thought, that probably sounded a bit harsher than intended.


    simenf - brainwashed by the big wheel mafia.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by simenf View Post
    The bike intelligencer review has no value apart from giving their subjective impression of a short test ride of two bikes without proper setup. Gives me very little and sounds like the Ripley was set up too hard.


    simenf - brainwashed by the big wheel mafia.
    To be fair, there are so few reviews out there, that this review is better than nothing. And they were honest - they said it was based on two short rides on a demo day. So you have to factor this in.

    It is interesting that the 120mm bike came across as more XC while the 100mm bike came across as more trail orientated Hopefully we'll see more reviews over the coming weeks.

  29. #29
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    I had a chance to have a demo for to days. I put in a 2 hour ride each day. I am coming off of a niner rip 9. the ripley I rode had the fox 120mm on the front. I am in love with the rear suspension on this bike. Going back if I had to pick one thing I noticed about the bike that stood out it would be how it accelerates. As I write that it sounds weird cause you think leg power should dictate this. The way the rear suspension works in relation to pedal tension just makes the bike go with less effort in my opinion. The second thing would be the steering and handling. The cheesey phrase is it feels like a 26er. I wont cheese out and say that ,but I will say that it has the most fun, corner carving handling of any big wheel bike I have ridden. So yes I ordered one this will be a perfect bike to do endurance races while still having maximum trail riding fun.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtn_bikin_bassplayer View Post
    I had a chance to have a demo for to days. I put in a 2 hour ride each day. I am coming off of a niner rip 9. the ripley I rode had the fox 120mm on the front. I am in love with the rear suspension on this bike. Going back if I had to pick one thing I noticed about the bike that stood out it would be how it accelerates. As I write that it sounds weird cause you think leg power should dictate this. The way the rear suspension works in relation to pedal tension just makes the bike go with less effort in my opinion. The second thing would be the steering and handling. The cheesey phrase is it feels like a 26er. I wont cheese out and say that ,but I will say that it has the most fun, corner carving handling of any big wheel bike I have ridden. So yes I ordered one this will be a perfect bike to do endurance races while still having maximum trail riding fun.
    I spoke with someone who shall remain anonymous because he's pretty well known on the forum. I conversed with him about his experience on the Ripley, and it mirrors almost exactly what you have said. So I guess that's just an emphasis on your post.

    I'm dying to put one of these bikes together.
    Note to self: 85% of FTP for 20 min.

  31. #31
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    I'm not the anonymous source, but I will reiterate that this bike is FAST. I am used to running 1x10 with a 28T chainring, went up to a 32T with the Ripley and I didn't miss a beat. This suspension design works so stinking well that it feels like cheating.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtn_bikin_bassplayer View Post
    I had a chance to have a demo for to days. I put in a 2 hour ride each day. I am coming off of a niner rip 9. the ripley I rode had the fox 120mm on the front. I am in love with the rear suspension on this bike. Going back if I had to pick one thing I noticed about the bike that stood out it would be how it accelerates. As I write that it sounds weird cause you think leg power should dictate this. The way the rear suspension works in relation to pedal tension just makes the bike go with less effort in my opinion. The second thing would be the steering and handling. The cheesey phrase is it feels like a 26er. I wont cheese out and say that ,but I will say that it has the most fun, corner carving handling of any big wheel bike I have ridden. So yes I ordered one this will be a perfect bike to do endurance races while still having maximum trail riding fun.
    I Demo'd a Ripley w/a 120 Fork today and think you nailed it with your assessment. My demo was only 45 minutes, but my impressions are they rear suspension is the best I have ridden and it really does corner no different than my 26er. I also demo'd the Yeti SB95c and the Intense Spider Comp and the Ibis definitely would be the single track winner for me. Rear suspension is amazing in that it is very efficient on fire road climbs but opened up tremendously on rock garden descents. Truly first-class. The Bad: I felt the bike was a little short in the TT for me and the HA was steeper than I would prefer, but that is personal preference. I am 5'11 and rode a large w/90 stem. I swapped out a 60mm stem as that was way too short. The quickness of the bike was fun but I would have probably preferred a slacker front end even though I'm more of trail/xc rider than AM. The bike would be a marathon killer I think as it may be the best climbing bike I have ridden with a much lighter SC Blur TRc (I know different kind of bike) right there with it. Bottom line: Incredible rear suspension, Great climber, and plush on descents. Handles like a 26er.

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    So has anyone hammered some descents on the Ripley with a 140mm fork and wants to share their thoughts? My riding includes a mix of tabletops and 2-3ft drops just wondering how this would size up against my yeti sb95.

  34. #34
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    I briefly demoed one the other day, been tire kicking 140mm 29ers for about a year. Sold. Perfect blend of plush/efficiency and incredible tight quarters handling. Off the shelf xt build with a 140mm 34 was just a tick over 27 pounds. Very impressive.

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    Did it feel more towards a XC bike or one that you could ride aggressively? For me its descending is more important that ascending and I'm hoping that the 140mm fork opens that up.

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    I am between the Ripley and the new Santa Cruz LTc ....any suggestions? Looking more for a AM/Trail rider but that is great and light climber as well as a fast descender. I have a Gary Fischer Superfly 100 for XC....

  37. #37
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    I currently ride a 80mm hardtail and both the Ripley and the LTc feel like AM machines based on my current whip.

    I felt that they were both very plush, but the Ripley was more flickable and easier to get your weight back. The Ripley also felt much snappier out of the saddle. I had both bikes set up with proper sag etc. I don't do any thing huge, but but could easily imagine my riding at my own limit all day long on the Ripley. It is a perfect compromise for the type of flowing and technical single track I ride.

    The only thing I didn't like on the Ripley was the cable routing. It had good flow, and looked ez to service but the little zip ties look crude in comparison to others.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by GMM View Post
    I also demo'd the Yeti SB95c and the Intense Spider Comp and the Ibis definitely would be the single track winner for me. Rear suspension is amazing in that it is very efficient on fire road climbs but opened up tremendously on rock garden descents. Truly first-class. The Bad: I felt the bike was a little short in the TT for me and the HA was steeper than I would prefer, but that is personal preference. I am 5'11 and rode a large w/90 stem. I swapped out a 60mm stem as that was way too short. The quickness of the bike was fun but I would have probably preferred a slacker front end even though I'm more of trail/xc rider than AM. The bike would be a marathon killer I think as it may be the best climbing bike I have ridden with a much lighter SC Blur TRc (I know different kind of bike) right there with it. Bottom line: Incredible rear suspension, Great climber, and plush on descents. Handles like a 26er.
    So you demoed a SB95c. What else could you say about that experience? Interesting that is has a slacker HT than the Ripley, but the rest of the geometry is almost the same. Looks to me that it falls somewhere between the 429 and the Ripley.
    Last edited by Simplemind; 04-29-2013 at 12:43 PM.

  39. #39
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    Where are the zip ties?

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    Along the tt and stays. The secure the cables to little bosses on the frame. Its not a deal breaker for me,and when it comes time to change a cable I'll probably love it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Simplemind View Post
    So you demoed a SB95c. What else could you say about that experience? Interesting that is has a slacker HT than the Ripley, but the rest of the geometry is almost the same. Looks to me that it falls somewhere between the 429 and the Ripley.
    To me the Yeti feels slacker than even its numbers suggest. It climbs very well, although I would give a slight edge to the Ripley on climbing. In terms of handling, I think it would come down to what qualities you like best in a bike-- SB95c is more stable and the Ripley is quicker. With the SB95c, I felt like I was "in" the bike and the Ripley I felt like I was more "on" the bike. Ripley's rear suspension was probably the best I have ridden. I was really surprised at how plush it was through rock gardens considering it climbs very efficiently. My caveat on all of this is that I only rode each bike about 45 minutes, although I did also demo a SB95a last year-- with a 140 fork. Both of the bikes on the recent demo were set up with 120 forks. The more I demo the more I think it's just about personal preference when choosing from the high-quality bike cos. There are all so good.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by m_t_b View Post
    those break and fall off if you ride more than a parking lot spin

  44. #44
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    Has anyone riding a Ripley with X Fusion Microlite Shock and can comment on it?

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    I have ordered one in blue was going to go for an angleset but now going to try it as is first
    Last edited by m_t_b; 05-01-2013 at 06:58 AM.

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    My son has them on his Transition Double which has ridden over the last couple of years including down Whistler mountain and none of them have falling off. They look great. Granted, the fit perfect on this bike and can be a little tricky to get on, but I'll use them on other bikes if they fit right in the first place.

  47. #47
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    Not a full review, but a decent ride impression. Ride Impression: Ibis Ripley 29er
    Blog Ramblings
    West Coast writer for twentynineinches.com

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    That's great thanks for sharing.

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    So ugly wheel guy is the only one who has ridden it?

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    Here's an excellent full review from Bike Magazine, enjoy!:

    http://www.ibiscycles.com/downloads/...ipley_Test.pdf

    H

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    http://www.ibiscycles.com/downloads/...ipley_Test.pdf


    Nice.....looking forward to trying one out.

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    Ripley Impressions

    Rider-6‘ 1” 230lbs XC, trail, AM,
    Riding style- smooth as sandpaper.
    Current ride large Carbine 275 X-fusion Vengeance 160mm, 2x10, I9 etc.
    Former rides Mojo HD 160, 150 140 varieties, Nomad, Banshee Rune, others
    Demo’d SB66 SB95, TRC, LTC, Tallboy LTC etc. etc.

    I demoed the 140 mm, XT build Ripley twice once at Sea Otter and once on my local 12 mile XC loop.

    Build:
    Fox 140mm just ok, can’t wait to see what the Pike and the x fusions are going to be like.
    The wheel set was a Stans arch, not enough stiffness for me.
    XT stuff is great; the Ice tech brakes were outstanding
    740mm bar- pretty cool
    Dropper post- mandatory unless you are racing
    Bike is beautiful, really nice work.

    I am big and my frame of reference is based upon burly 160mm bikes so take the next statements with grain of salt. My Carbine is built pretty Burly at 29ish lbs and it’s very very plush at the sacrifice of some climbing efficiency. It’s amazing on the DHs and decent on the climbs.

    The Ripley is very fast and efficient roughly 10-15% less energy expended at climbing, coasting, and railing the xc type single -track compared to my 275 Carbine. The Ripley handles like a 26 inch xc bike its very nimble almost twitchy on the single-track. The large felt a bit small (Ibis sizing for 6’1” is a tough fit I fell half way between sizes) even with the 70mm stem and 740mm bars. I wish I could have tried a XL but they are not available for a few months. The bike felt a little too quick and little to small and not plush enough for me. Granted I probably could get it to work better with some tuning and the longer XL wheelbase may help as its closer to my preferred 45” wheelbase.

    The Bottom Line-It is exactly what IBIS intended, a bad a$$ XC/trail bike, as that as the target it is amazing. Truly amazing! It’s a cheater bike, I kept telling my friends I was riding with. I think I could get used to the xc feel with more time. AS TESTED-The bike is agile, fast, stiff and fun just not enough bike for me for a one and only bike, because I am a hack. There was not that “safety factor” of a 160mm bike when it gets rougher or you make a mistake. The perfect combo (for me and the one bike XC to AM riders) would be a Ripley and a HD 160. Or even better Ripley HD 140mm with 150mm fork (new Pike perhaps!). Please IBIS build a 140 HD version with the new suspension hardware but less anti-squat like the HD 160mm curve, or maybe a 140mm-150mm true 275??

    Conclusion- In my humble opinion nothing beats an Ibis for stiffness, build and ride quality, other above listed bikes are close. I would give both the HD and Ripley As for their intended purposes! A XL Ripley with a 35MM Pike and better shock tuning and some I9 wheels and my cockpit set up would probably alleviate most of the concerns voiced above. A plusher 140mm HD Ripley would be a game changer for me.

    Hope this helps the clydes out there,

    Kevo

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    Thanks for the words motoguru. Well that is pretty much how I am building mine up. 140mm 34's (they are 2014 which are supposedly improved dampening over the 2013 not sure what they had on your demo) 740 bar 70mm stem and a large Im 5'11. Im buying it without access to a demo which I swore I would never do again.... I ride my bikes pretty hard and like to have a bit of a safety buffer built in! Sounds like I might not get so much of that with the Ripley but I had to change the way i ride when I bought my SB95 last year Im sure I can adapt again.
    Im not looking to huck this off huge jumps but I do want it to be able to be ridden aggressively and not feel like a XC bike but more a long travel 29 trail weapon!

    I guess I will find out if that's possible in a week or so :-)

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    Ibis is shaping to be very bad for a budget these days. As I keep going burlier with my 6-month-old HD, I'm suddenly getting the desire to build up a super light Ripley, accept that my HD should be heavier than 30lbs, and ride each based on where I'm going and how I feel that day. And of course, there's the teased bike coming out next week. Yikes.

  56. #56
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    The new bike has to be a Tranny 29, even my Ripley box had a check box for "T29".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin+M View Post
    The new bike has to be a Tranny 29, even my Ripley box had a check box for "T29".
    Agreed. While I'd love to see a 650b HD or SLR, the Tranny is definitely over due for an update. Does anyone even ride 26" hardtails any more?

  58. #58
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    If andrew whiteford is riding something stealth around, it's gotta be on the bigger side of things, right? Perhaps that's just wishful thinking, but still...

  59. #59
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    Hd-r.

  60. #60
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    The pinkbike review is good but also a bit nonsensical. Love the acceleration, climbed climbs never done before, plush...we recommend big heavy tires????

  61. #61
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    We the people ... Ripley vs Tallboy LTc

    I like to make things short. This review will be short too.
    After reading all statements in this thread I asked myself how the Ripley compares to the Tallboy LTc that I like so much.
    I live in Switzerland where the trails are often rocky and steep. So here are some short and personal answers that other riders might disagree.

    All answers compares to the Santa Cruz Tallboy LTc and to a frame who sells in the USA as "HammerHead Thumper" (and that I very like too!)

    How is the handling?
    Very agile! Certainly the fastest and most agile bike of the three.

    How good is it uphill?
    Very good! Climbs better than the Tallboy because of the rear end. Climbs better than the Thumper because of the lower weight. But Thumper has a steeper seat angle which is an advantage too.

    How good is it downhill?
    Not really convincing. This is a trail bike and even with the 140mm fork, the rear with the 120mm is not even close to the performance that the Tallboy has. I also liked the Thumper better downhill because it was more safety-inspiring than the Ripley.

    Bottomline:

    The Ripley is a perfekt trail bike which speeds up faster than both competitiors and rides like a 26" bike (which I do not search when riding a 29er) that tends to be a bit nervous.
    You sit on the bike insted of in the bike (which I very like on 29er). Though the Ripley is no allmountain rig. It has not enough plushness in the rear and the tire clearance on the height is on the lower side.
    See the picture attached that shows the clearance for a Bontrager 29-4 tire.

    Would I buy the Ripley for softer trail riding and marathon races? Absolutely!
    Would I buy the Ripley as a replacement for the Tallboy LTc? No way!

    Sorry for possible mistakes because my native language is not English.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IBIS Ripley Reviews-rip1.jpg  

    IBIS Ripley Reviews-rip2.jpg  

    IBIS Ripley Reviews-rip3.jpg  

    IBIS Ripley Reviews-rip4.jpg  


  62. #62
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    Maettu, very interesting review. I own a tallboy LTc and have considered a change. I really do like my LTc a lot. How tall are you. I think a lot of the fit comes down to your size and the bike. I'm 5'11 and the tallboy feels a little big, but many people on the ripley in the 6'1 range feel cramped on the L. The Santa Cruz definitely is more bike, but it also might be slightly longer favoring taller riders

  63. #63
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    That's right, the Ripley in "L" is a tad smaller than the Tallboy LTc in "L". I'm exact 6' and for me it was not a big problem. The saddle to handlebar length was only about 5mm shorter compared to the TB.

    I think if you like to ride hard with the Tallboy LTc as I do (I used to be a downhiller) you will be a little bit disappointed from the rear end capacity. However, it would be weird if you did not notice the 15mm difference in rear wheel travel.

    But one thing is clear. If IBIS will ever make a Ripley HD I'm on board because the DW-Link suspension works a bit better when climbing and accelerating.

    Tallboy LTc (not Ripley) in action...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dpca10 View Post
    Maettu, very interesting review. I own a tallboy LTc and have considered a change. I really do like my LTc a lot. How tall are you. I think a lot of the fit comes down to your size and the bike. I'm 5'11 and the tallboy feels a little big, but many people on the ripley in the 6'1 range feel cramped on the L. The Santa Cruz definitely is more bike, but it also might be slightly longer favoring taller riders

  64. #64
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    @Maettu: how long is the stem you are using?

  65. #65
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    I guess I'm looking at it from a different point of view... I want a ripley for speed, something for my everyday xc/light AM rig. I have an HD already for the big stuff, I ride my carbon hardtail 29er for xc now, an I just want something that's alot more versatile.. I think the ripley could be built to be an awesome all day trail bike, and also race with it..
    Full time rider part time racer...

    See my adventures here..

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  66. #66
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    Thanks for the honest thoughts Maettu. It usually takes 3 months of glowing everything until we hear about any negatives.
    That being said I just bought a ripley, but you have me plenty of reason to hold on to my LTc.
    There are a few things in your review that actually made me want a ripley more. First of all if that picture is any indication of the trails you ride the Tallboy LTc absolutely would dominate. But I only ride rock chunder in that class about 10% of the time. Otherwise I ride smooth single track with sections of roots and rock gardens. The way I've set my tallboy LTc up is just too much bike most of the time. (Slackens the fork 1 degree, 50ml stem, cane creek DB air, carbon wheels and xx1).
    With such a burly setup I absorb most of the trail, don't flow with it. That being said when I'm in my full face and pads I'm like a tank commander, nothing I can't roll over.
    With this in mind I'm having trouble taking the LTc out to my local trails as I have more flow on my niner air-9 single speed.
    The other really interesting point you made is how you felt the bike might even be considered "twitchy". When it comes to ibis bikes I would consider this their hallmark trait. People who aren't into ibis often quote this quality. I had a mojo SL before the LTc and loved that bike but wanted the 29er experience. If they managed to dial in the "twitchy" mojo feel in a 29er then I'm in.
    I'm glad I thought this through. I'll initially swap my parts over but probably build back up the LTc for big mountain days. I'll post my review soon!

  67. #67
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    Dpca10, this may be the bike for you. I've had the Ripley for about 10 days now. I've had about 90 miles on it so far including the 12 hours of Temecula race this past weekend. I am coming off a tallboyC with XX, 120mm Fox and Reynolds carbons. Prior to that I was on a Blur LT. In Southern California my rides consist of fire road climbing and technical single track, although not as rocky as Maettus photos reveal. I loved the tallboy, but it was time for a change. Of note, I also have a Spot SS with a 100mm fork and I really love the flow of that bike. First of all, I've been riding variations of the VPP since the 90's (remember the Outland??), and i was committed to it. The Ripley's DW rear was a game changer for me. It is such an efficient climber, it is just so fast. Are all DW's like this??? I've climbed in the C, T, D modes, and the descend mode is much more efficient than the stiffest mode on my Tallboy. During the race, a 9.2 mile loop with some short technical climbs I have the rear in 'D' without an issue.
    I also found during the fast, downhill, rolling double track of the race I was able to stay seated, I don't think I would have been able to do that on the Tallboy.
    Everyone talks about the Ripley as being 'twitchy'. Perhaps, but in a good way. Its just fast side to side, I can really dance with it. Its a point and shoot. I also find myself in the air more during transitions in the trail. Its also faster on the switchbacks and tight stuff. After my first real downhill on a trail I've been riding for 20 years, the first thing i said to myself was, 'i feel like a better rider'. I moved all the parts over from the Tallboy aside from the fork which is a 120 that came with the frame. I am also using a dropper post for the first time. All this @ 26.2 lbs.
    Anyway, this is my initial impression. Dpca, get out and demo if you can, this may be what you are looking for.......

  68. #68
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    90mm --> The same length I use on the Tallboy LTc

    Quote Originally Posted by simenf View Post
    @Maettu: how long is the stem you are using?

  69. #69
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    So, I got to put 10 miles on a demo last night. I did a demo a couple weeks ago, on a ripley set up with dropper post and 140mm fork, an then last night I did 10 miles of technical rocky rooty singletrack that I have ridden many times on both my HD and my carbon hardtail 29er on a ripley demo with no dropper post and 120mm fox up front. So, here goes... I did let my buddy ride it as well, an he has a giant XTC 0 composite 29er at 23lbs just like my Felt 9 carbon at 23.5 lbs. We both said the same things...

    1st.. with the 71 degree HA, and 120mm fork it felt like I was riding my hardtail. Climbed just as good, if not better especially on techy ups. I was a LITTLE slower on double track smooth climbs.. but I had also spent all I had on a super tech 1 mile KOM run..

    2nd, cornering.. again, it felt just like my hardtail.. geo is very similar to my hardtail. hardtail has a 72* ha an the ripley a 71 with 120 front. I was able to just weave through the tight stuff, it was built with the ibis carbon 740 bars which were able to go through without rubbing like my 785's on my HD

    3rd.. speed.. which is what I was going for.. I managed to shave over one minute and 20 seconds off a usually 10 1/2 minute mile segment (very tech, lots of quick turns, fast little down hills into really tough straight up techy climbs) and was able to grab the KOM.

    Bottom line on the ripley, it will not replace my HD but I think it will be the perfect trail, xc, race bike that will easily replace my 23lb 29er hardtail. As it felt JUST like my hardtail with more squish, less fatigue, an just plain fast. I ran it most of the time in the descend mode.. didn't really notice too much of a difference. Personally for me though, having tried both the 120 and 140 fronts for all around trail riding I really like the 140 with inverted stem vs the 120 with standard stem. But, for racing I can see wanting that tight snappy feeling like you get with the 120 front. I don't see the ripley as an ALL mountain slayer like a tall boy LTC but I see it as a crazy fast xc/trail bike that is super fun, flickable, surprisingly fun in the air and poppy off rocks an smallish jumps an drops, and just plain awesome for anyone that want's the performance of a hardtail with all the added bonuses that come with full squish!
    Full time rider part time racer...

    See my adventures here..

    https://www.instagram.com/projectnortheast/

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by manchvegas View Post
    just plain awesome for anyone that want's the performance of a hardtail with all the added bonuses that come with full squish!
    Awesome summary. Just what I'm looking for in a fullsus bike
    Better to have and not need it, than to need it and not have it.

  71. #71
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    yeah, it's definitely not what some people are looking for.. but for those of us that want a hardtail type of performance, but nothing that holds you back like a fully rigid frame or the inability to change geo with different forks it really is the perfect xc/light all mountain race bike. Can't wait to build mine up.. all the parts waiting for my large frame to arrive!
    Full time rider part time racer...

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  72. #72
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    IBIS Ripley Reviews

    Reading the different experiences of thr Ripley, it seems to me that the definitions of XC/trail/AM are varying a lot. A 140 forked 29er XC machine?

    Lately I've been riding everything from the new Trek Remedy 29 to my old Giant XTC 26 HT...for reference.
    Sounds like the Ripley will cover a lot of uses in any case. I like it rooty, fast and techy. Not being stong in 6 ft drops is no issue to me.


    simenf - brainwashed by the big wheel mafia.

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by simenf View Post
    Reading the different experiences of thr Ripley, it seems to me that the definitions of XC/trail/AM are varying a lot. A 140 forked 29er XC machine?

    Lately I've been riding everything from the new Trek Remedy 29 to my old Giant XTC 26 HT...for reference.
    Sounds like the Ripley will cover a lot of uses in any case. I like it rooty, fast and techy. Not being stong in 6 ft drops is no issue to me.


    simenf - brainwashed by the big wheel mafia.
    HD-R 650? With a light build.?

  74. #74
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    I think I should finally chime in. I bought the Ripley large and took all my components off my Tallboy LTc. So I have a very direct comparison. I definitely ride on the all mountain side of xc, and even venture into the DH territory. I have the fox 34 140mm fork on it. To start at the end I'm very happy with the Ripley, it makes every ride super fun. I love the climbing ability of this bike and the whippy feeling on the trails. I've definitely had a fair share of bottom outs hitting jumps and going off ledges but the rear suspension does its job and I never get bucked. For the trails I ride 90% of the time this bike is perfect. The LTc has a more bottomless feel especially with the cane creek dbair, but was less efficient on the climbs and pumping the trail. If you ride harsh rock chunder downhill all day like the previous review then the LTc would be your bike. If you can pump the trail and climb a lot then the ripley is the bike to have. There isn't much you can't throw at this thing. Unless you own a HD or nomad I would highly recommend the 140 fork and invert the stem as many have done.

  75. #75
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    IBIS Ripley Reviews

    Quote Originally Posted by canuck_tacoma View Post
    HD-R 650? With a light build.?
    I have an XL Ripley on the way :-)


    simenf - brainwashed by the big wheel mafia.

  76. #76
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    I have an HD.. but I also have a ripley on the way.. still went the 140 route I can always lower it if need be, but I like the 35mm stansions for stability. I think the HD in full 160 rear an 170 front mode an the ripley is the perfect combo. ride the ripley on xc an light all mountain, train on the HD and the bigger AM places, an then on race day the ripley will that much faster. Only thing I'll have to decide is which bike I'll use for the couple enduro races coming up
    Full time rider part time racer...

    See my adventures here..

    https://www.instagram.com/projectnortheast/

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  78. #78
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    Great review. And a build under 24 pounds. And it can be made lighter.

    Ha! So they're saying what I said when I'm pretty sure I rubbed Scot the wrong way in an email saying they ought to drop the internal routing. At least now I feel a little justified. My first thought was seeing a groove around the steer tube. I'd never run them in there. I have doubts about whether the stresses on the steer tube are great enough in that location to ever be problematic, unless it were truly a notch, which it wouldn't be. However, I'm not going to be the one to find out.


    Quote Originally Posted by canuck_tacoma View Post
    Note to self: 85% of FTP for 20 min.

  79. #79
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    I've had a brake cable rub a large groove in a CSU after two rides. Would have sawed right through if it wasn't noticed.

  80. #80
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    I'm curious to see what the long term solution to the rubbing cables will be.

    However, getting a solution to an internal routing for a Stealth dropper is high on my list. External routing for dropper posts is just not optimal.
    On the other hand, if Ibis releases a new Ripley frame next year that adresses the routing issues (incl a dropper post), I guess I'll feel pretty bummed with the original.

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by simenf View Post
    I'm curious to see what the long term solution to the rubbing cables will be.

    However, getting a solution to an internal routing for a Stealth dropper is high on my list. External routing for dropper posts is just not optimal.
    On the other hand, if Ibis releases a new Ripley frame next year that adresses the routing issues (incl a dropper post), I guess I'll feel pretty bummed with the original.
    If I end up moving to a two bike quiver, the Ripley will be one of the bikes, but I have to say that these engineering issues (cable routing and loose linkage) are a bummer, especially when some of the appeal of the bike is that it seems to be a real marvel of engineering.

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by hillharman View Post
    If I end up moving to a two bike quiver, the Ripley will be one of the bikes, but I have to say that these engineering issues (cable routing and loose linkage) are a bummer, especially when some of the appeal of the bike is that it seems to be a real marvel of engineering.
    I'm with you...I'm going to wait a bit before I get a Ripley.

  83. #83
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    What's with the linkage?

  84. #84
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    I think the cable routing is no issue at all.. All internal routing is a little bit of a pain to install but i have had no rubbing issues. My friend had a little rub and it was because the bike shop zip tied his cables too tight as the exited the seat tube. A few strategically placed bits of frame protectant tape solves everything. Which is what he did and i did preventitively. This is standard practice on all carbon bikes, just some come already placed. The frame comes with about 8 circles for placement. Look at the Tallboy carbon for example, there are huge swatches of frame tape on the head tube as the cables come around. If you are gouging your bike it is because you don't know how to care for a carbon frame.

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dpca10 View Post
    I think the cable routing is no issue at all.. All internal routing is a little bit of a pain to install but i have had no rubbing issues. My friend had a little rub and it was because the bike shop zip tied his cables too tight as the exited the seat tube. A few strategically placed bits of frame protectant tape solves everything. Which is what he did and i did preventitively. This is standard practice on all carbon bikes, just some come already placed. The frame comes with about 8 circles for placement. Look at the Tallboy carbon for example, there are huge swatches of frame tape on the head tube as the cables come around. If you are gouging your bike it is because you don't know how to care for a carbon frame.
    The cable rub on the steerer tube is a problem. It looks like they have a fix for it though.

  86. #86
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    There are no reported problems I know of with the linkage and mine is fine been riding it for nearly 4 months now. Not sure what hes on about.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dpca10 View Post
    I think the cable routing is no issue at all.. All internal routing is a little bit of a pain to install but i have had no rubbing issues. My friend had a little rub and it was because the bike shop zip tied his cables too tight as the exited the seat tube. A few strategically placed bits of frame protectant tape solves everything. Which is what he did and i did preventitively. This is standard practice on all carbon bikes, just some come already placed. The frame comes with about 8 circles for placement. Look at the Tallboy carbon for example, there are huge swatches of frame tape on the head tube as the cables come around. If you are gouging your bike it is because you don't know how to care for a carbon frame.
    Aluminium and Carbon bikes both come with protective film for cable rub. This is generally cosmetic reasons.

    If the cables are sawing through parts it's bad design, routing, by the shop or manufacturer. Most people wouldn't expect to be sawing through their steer tube and wouldn't even check for it.

  88. #88
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    It's not exactly sawing through thats a little dramatic, mine is hardly marked after nearly 4 months. Ibis are sending out sleeves for steerers in a couple of weeks.

  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by m_t_b View Post
    It's not exactly sawing through thats a little dramatic, mine is hardly marked after nearly 4 months. Ibis are sending out sleeves for steerers in a couple of weeks.
    They wouldn't be sending out sleeves if it wasn't a concern.

    This thread is suppose to be about Reviews...a new one should be started about the steerer if needed?

  90. #90
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    Finally got a chance to ride a Ripley

    Had the opportunity to take a Ripley out for an extended ride the other day. The shop was gracious enough to allow me to have it for the whole afternoon and I took full advantage of it.

    Coming from my HD 160, I was sceptical that the Ripley was going to handle the trails the same way as the HD. I couldn't have been more wrong. This is a fun, fast, and capable bike. It climbs, it rolls trails, responsive in the corners, and descends with authority.

    Impressions:

    • Really liked it, they do look better in person.
    • It was stiff, not HD stiff, but felt good.
    • Riding a MD HD with a 70 stem...The MD Ripley with a 90 Stem fit quite well and felt right at home on it. The 90 Stem was ok for descending as the bigger tire does stick out further and makes you feel more secure. Ibis has said this over and over, but until you try it....
    • Rear suspension is quite plush. I took a few 3footers to flat at speed and it soaked it up. Was pleasantly surprised.
    • Rocky Rooty trails, this bike kicked my HD's ass. It just soaked them up, while my HD always felt harsh. Rolling down rock faces just felt alot smoother and more controlled.
    • 32 fork was more than enough for it.
    • Did I mention it was a very capable descender? Climbing, ride quality, and roll over efficiency is what I expected...the descending ability really surprised me.


    My riding style is fast and flowy single track, with drops and small jumps. Rooty and rocky terrain to smoother loose over hardpack. Love Strava and climb everything I see. I had a blast on the Ripley and wouldn't hesitate to recommend it.

    Ripley over the HD? This is a hard one. Took my HD out the day after and it felt very good. It was easier to turn through trees, snappier, popping off of jumps was super fun, stiff as viagra, and climbs like a goat. It was going great until I got to a rocky, rooty trail, then I was wishing I was on the Ripley. Both bikes shine in their own way.

    130 HD-R 650......will that be the sweet spot?

  91. #91
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    MY Ripley after 3 months, 850 miles

    I though it might be useful for a report on my experiences in my 3 months and 850 miles on my Large Ripley.
    Me: 220 lbs, 6'1.5"; 33" inseam
    Riding history: MTB since 1985, mostly XC oriented, fairly regular Xterra Competitor
    Riding terrain: 90% SF Bay Area (Marin/SC/Skeggs); 10% Tahoe (N and west shore)
    Rider Type: fairly aggressive, not that into jumping off stuff, I like going fast and smooth.

    This was my first 29er but third Ibis. The build started out as a basic stock XT bike with a 110 mm stem, 120 mm fork, and has an XT triple crank. I was right between frame sizes but went with the large frame and slightly longer stem. I wanted the shorter wheelbase for the handling. Very happy with decision.

    It took me a while to adjust to 29 inch wheels but after 200 miles or so I settled in with it. I had creaking problems at first but when I greased the shock mount and replaced the lower clevis bolt, creaking stopped. Warranty at Ibis was awesome, sent them a email mid day on Wednesday the part was on my desk by 1 pm thursday, service!!!

    My initial impressions were that the bike was fast as all get out, but I still missed the slow speed handling, flickability, and general playfulness of my Mojo SL. Did I say the bike is fast, I was posting segment times that I have not done since I was in my early 30's. I would like to think it was because of my gnarly 50 yo self but I have to give the real credit to the bike. Its just that much faster. The bike does everything well, cornering and descending are confidence inspiring. Its not super plush feeling, its definitely most at home chewing up miles and was a joy to ride on some longer 35+ mile rides.

    For me and my size I did feel a bit of flex in the rear wheel, especially on off camber trails and roads. I purchased a set of light bikes carbon wheels with Novatec hubs about 300 miles ago. Slapped them on right out of box, been fine so far. To me the wheel set transformed the bike from really, really good to scary awesome. The slower wheel spin up and the downside of large wheel handling characteristics were dramatically changed. The bike exhibited more characteristics of my beloved Mojo but the Ripley was so much better at climbing and hammering along. I am never eating dust on group rides now. I think my Mojo SL is bummed.

    The only issue I have right now is my Easton EC90 post (400 mm) seems to be a creak fiend. After a ride it starts to creak. It will stop if clean it and reset, but comes back after about 4 hours of riding. I tried using a quick release clamp as well as using some locktite to prevent the loosing of the bolt but I have met with limited success. I am swapping to a Thompson post now to see if that will solve the problem. I am open to any ideas. The cable routing definitely needs some refining in the next iterations.

    In summary, the Ripley is the perfect bike for SF bay riding. Fast and beautiful and it attracts MILFs like its giving off pheromones. I believe a sub 1600 gram wheel set and tubeless set up is the way to go and unleashes the potential of this bike. The bike just makes me want to "ride more and work less"

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red Smurf View Post
    I though it might be useful for a report on my experiences in my 3 months and 850 miles on my Large Ripley.
    Me: 220 lbs, 6'1.5"; 33" inseam
    Riding history: MTB since 1985, mostly XC oriented, fairly regular Xterra Competitor
    Riding terrain: 90% SF Bay Area (Marin/SC/Skeggs); 10% Tahoe (N and west shore)
    Rider Type: fairly aggressive, not that into jumping off stuff, I like going fast and smooth.

    This was my first 29er but third Ibis. The build started out as a basic stock XT bike with a 110 mm stem, has an XT triple crank. I was right between frame sizes but went with the large frame and slightly longer stem. I wanted the shorter wheelbase for the handling. Very happy with decision.

    It took me a while to adjust to 29 inch wheels but after 200 miles or so I settled in with it. I had creaking problems at first but when I greased the shock mount and replaced the lower clevis bolt, creaking stopped. Warranty at Ibis was awesome, sent them a email mid day on Wednesday the part was on my desk by 1 pm thursday, service!!!

    My initial impressions were that the bike was fast as all get out, but I still missed the slow speed handling, flickability, and general playfulness of my Mojo SL. Did I say the bike is fast, I was posting segment times that I have not done since I was in my early 30's. I would like to think it was because of my gnarly 50 yo self but I have to give the real credit to the bike. Its just that much faster. The bike does everything well, cornering and descending are confidence inspiring. Its not super plush feeling, its definitely most at home chewing up miles and was a joy to ride on some longer 35+ mile rides.

    For me and my size I did feel a bit of flex in the rear wheel, especially on off camber trails and roads. I purchased a set of light bikes carbon wheels with Novatec hubs about 300 miles ago. Slapped them on right out of box, been fine so far. To me the wheel set transformed the bike from really, really good to scary awesome. The slower wheel spin up and the downside of large wheel handling characteristics were dramatically changed. The bike exhibited more characteristics of my beloved Mojo but the Ripley was so much better at climbing and hammering along. I am never eating dust on group rides now. I think my Mojo SL is bummed.

    The only issue I have right now is my Easton EC90 post (400 mm) seems to be a creak fiend. After a ride it starts to creak. It will stop if clean it and reset, but comes back after about 4 hours of riding. I tried using a quick release clamp as well as using some locktite to prevent the loosing of the bolt but I have met with limited success. I am swapping to a Thompson post now to see if that will solve the problem. I am open to any ideas. The cable routing definitely needs some refining in the next iterations.

    In summary, the Ripley is the perfect bike for SF bay riding. Fast and beautiful and it attracts MILFs like its giving off pheromones. I believe a sub 1600 gram wheel set and tubeless set up is the way to go and unleashes the potential of this bike. The bike just makes me want to "ride more and work less"
    Cool to hear your thoughts. You are on the larger end of people I've heard about on larges. Good data point to have.

  93. #93
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    good wheels make such a huge difference. I once heard someone say that when you're riding a bike, you're really riding two wheels...the 'bike' just connects you to the wheels.

    I'm fortunate to be rolling some enve am's on my ripley, but before those I was riding speeddream's and it was, really, the speeddreams that got me interested in the value of a great set of wheels. I'd had other wheels built identically before, but not my Dave...then I rode his and was amazed at the difference a good build can make. The enve's are astonishing...especially as you move to the bigger diameter (like 29's)...that stiff rim makes a really big diff. Running tubeless is also a big plus...I'm not as big as you but I'm about the same age and ride in the same terrain and have really been digging the 2.3 WTB weirwolfs I'm running.

    As for the Ripley - mine continues to really impress. I bought my frame with a 140 / 34 fork and really like the stiffness but have been wanting to lower the front end a bit for better handling. So last week I picked up a barely-used 32 / 120 from another local ripley owner (he was moving to a pike) and have a handful of rides on it. As I suspected, I really like the handling of the bike at 120...though I think even 130 might be just as good...what surprised me was the stiffness in that 32 chassis. It's been awhile since I rode a 32 and I've gotten accustomed to the bigger forks (I run a 36 float on my HD)...so that was nice. And it is about .6 lbs lighter on my good digital scale. I can't say that the weight difference is noticeable, especially since I don't have mine build up particularly light (~27.6 lbs with the 34, 27 lbs with the 32).

    Oh, and btw, when I switched the forks out I examined my steer tube from my 34 and found no sign of cable rub.

  94. #94
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    In Germany both the Bike and Mountain Bike magazines tested Ripley on their latest issues (#10/2013). Both Magazine's test bikes were fitted with the XT build kit but the Bike Magazine test bike had 140 mm Float on the bike whereas the Mountain Bike had 120 mm Float on the bike.

    Here is a brief summary of their tests. My German is far from perfect and English is not my native language either so I'm not sure if I've understood everything 100 % correct.

    First some numerical data from Bike which listed more data. Their test bike was size M and MB test bike size L.

    Measured geometry:
    - Reach: 376 mm
    - Stack: 626 mm
    - BB height: 337 mm
    - Top tube: 587 mm
    - Wheelbase: 1114 mm
    - Chainstay: 445 mm
    - Seat angle: 71.7 deg
    - Head angle: 68.6 deg

    Other measurements:
    - Weight without pedals: 12.75 kg (which is interesting since MB says that their test bike in size L weighed 11.8 kg without pedals. However Bike's bike was fitted with adjustable seatpost whereas MB's bike didn't have that. Bike's bike also had Hans Dampf 2.35 tyres (MB's bike Mountain King 2.2). Also the 140 mm fork in Bike's bike is heavier.)
    - Frame without shock: 2.253 kg (MB's frame + shock 2.520 g)
    - Suspension travel (rear): 122 mm

    So what did the magazines say about Ripley? Well, both magazines give the bike a rating of Sehr Gut (=very good) which is the second best rating on a six rating scale.

    In their summary Bike says:
    Plusses:
    + Versatile platform for both 120 and 140 mm forks
    + Handy geometry
    Minuses:
    - Pedal feedback on small chainring

    Mountain Bike's summary:
    Plusses:
    + Super agile handling for 29er
    + Light, elegant frame
    + Lively and efficient uphill
    Minuses:
    - Rear almost too tight(?) (the german word is straff)

    Both magazines say the the handling is very agile/nimble and MB even says that the Ripley is most playful 29er they've ridden ever.
    Pertti
    Lahti, Finland
    MC Kramppi

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Portti View Post
    Both magazines say the the handling is very agile/nimble and MB even says that the Ripley is most playful 29er they've ridden ever.
    I have to agree with this. The handling is surprising in a very good way. Perfect complement to my 26" 160 hdr.

  96. #96
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    IBIS Ripley Reviews

    Thanks.

    Straff in German means firm.


    simenf - brainwashed by the big wheel mafia.

  97. #97
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    IBIS Ripley Reviews

    Bike also commented on the frame stiffness, which at just under 60Nm/degree is average at best, as it might be an issue for heavier riders. And they fussed about the FD not working properly. That might be set up.

    However, Bike is infamous for being anal about their lab testing. The riding was conducted on the fast, flat and flowy Isar-trails around Munich, Germany. It was not stated the duration of the test, which may have been brief or only a handful of rides for what I know. Sort of got the impression it was a short test from the lack of elaboration of ride characteristics.


    simenf - brainwashed by the big wheel mafia.

  98. #98
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    Nm/degree. What's that?
    Note to self: 85% of FTP for 20 min.

  99. #99
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    IBIS Ripley Reviews

    Quote Originally Posted by Gregg K View Post
    Nm/degree. What's that?
    Amount of force/torque required to bend the frame one degree torsionally. Measured in a rig where the bottom bracket and rear axle are clamped solid and the frame twisted sideways by a big bar through the head tube.


    simenf - brainwashed by the big wheel mafia.

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by simenf View Post
    Bike also commented on the frame stiffness, which at just under 60Nm/degree is average at best, as it might be an issue for heavier riders.
    That's the first I've heard of Ripley stiffness qualms. I've mostly heard the opposite, with several regular riders glowing about the rear end torsional stiffness.
    - -benja- -

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