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  1. #1
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    Ibis Mojo. An Endurance bike option?

    Calling all Ibis owners,
    I plan to start riding Endurance and stage races this year as I have been a roadie for too long and am looking for a new challenge. At the moment I am considering the Trek Fuel EX9.5 and the Ibis Mojo. My questions are; Would the Ibis make a good endurance bike? Given the option which of these 2 would you want to ride on Transalps/rockies etc? I was going to buy a Scott Spark but have lost interest now as I feel they are more suited to XC racing as most reviews have said it is better on the short shock setting. All feedback is much appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Oh ..yes!

    Quote Originally Posted by vintage
    Calling all Ibis owners,
    I plan to start riding Endurance and stage races this year as I have been a roadie for too long and am looking for a new challenge. At the moment I am considering the Trek Fuel EX9.5 and the Ibis Mojo. My questions are; Would the Ibis make a good endurance bike? Given the option which of these 2 would you want to ride on Transalps/rockies etc? I was going to buy a Scott Spark but have lost interest now as I feel they are more suited to XC racing as most reviews have said it is better on the short shock setting. All feedback is much appreciated.
    It is 5.6 pounds of frame (medium) 5.5" travel and a very efficient ride (actually: the most efficient suspension bike I ever tried).

    You can build an incredibly capable and light transalp bike starting from that: my Mojo is 24 pounds and change with no compromises 180/160 disks and 2.4/2.25 tires. I'll take my Mojo to Europe in June with the idea of doing some very serious touring in the Val d'Ossola.

    The geometry with the reccomanded fork is almost perfect. However for extended climbing you should think carefully about the fork just because of bobbing issues: either get a standard FOX TALAS/FLOAT RLC and have it PUSHED (www.pushindustries.com), or get a FOX FLOAT/TALAS X. I personally would pick a PUSH/FOX because in my experience it works as well as inertia-valved forks at reducing bob. The TALAS at 120mm will give you a steeper geometry that might be all you need for very extended climbs. Or go for a compromise and buy a 2006 fox that is at 130mm.
    Last edited by Davide; 03-06-2007 at 11:03 AM.

  3. #3
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    Depends

    As well as "efficiency" (which at the end of the day can only truly be determined by testing with power), you should also think about geometry, and whether you can achieve a suitable position on the bikes while keeping handling good. E.g. the Ibis has a 69 degree head angle; combine that with a cross-country length stem to get a good racing position and the steering might not be ideal. Of course personal preferance will come into this.

    I've ridden the Transalp, and to be honest it's questionable whether you want FS at all. There's a lot of smooth gravel and tarmac climbs when hardtails will be nicer, and not so much rocky tech. You also have to consider what will be good for charging along in the roadie packs that form on the valley floors. Best if you can try things out. Hardtails also have less to worry about and maintain. For the Transalp, out of the Trek FS line up I would actually go for one of their race bikes, not their trail bikes.

    I believe Transrockies is gnarlier, and FS comfort could well pay more dividends. There you might want to think about mud clearance, reliability and ease of keeping pivots running nicely, which bike will be easier to portage. One nice thing about the Ibis is you could just pack a spare set of the forged link and bearing combos.

  4. #4
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    Very informed feedback there which has made me look at my options in a new light. I should probably have said that I am looking for a good all-rounder as well as I will only have the one bike in my stable. Having said that if XC is my primary concern then the Ibis is probably not the best choice. Judging from these remarks I will be going back to look at other options. Thanks folks.

  5. #5
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    I think you need to read some of the threads here. I sense from them that this is perhaps more capable of a cross country bike than it may seem. Check out the thread where there is a list of the world class race winners. Or the Derby posts where he talks about the handling.

    I'm buying this bike for only xc purposes. The DW link is why.

    I honestly think that Ibis is selling this bike for a lot less than they could. I know that sounds silly considering it's six grand by the time one puts good components on it. But this bike is designed with love. Look at the price of the replacement link on their website. Twenty bucks! And I see nothing that could possibly be problematic on this bike during use. Those links have big bearings. These guys designed the hell out of this bike. And I'm a mechanical engineer. I do this stuff too.

  6. #6
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    Close in some ways, but...

    The Mojo does have a lot going for it - light weight and DW link - but in terms of geometry it's not aimed at XC racing. If you look, the geometry is very close to a Turner 5-spot. I own a 5-spot and it is no XC race bike, largely because of this. I've also ridden a Turner Nitrous, and that screams race bike, largely because of its geometry. When you're hammering along some flat double track at 25 mph trying to hold a wheel inches in front, or grinding up a mountain pass for two hours, these things matter. Only the original poster can decide on what is the right bike for their needs, but for this kind of racing you need to consider all options. E.g. with the new Cannondale Taurine, you could easily build a superlight, sub 20lb hardtail with a plush 4" fork. In terms of FS there is still more that can be done for XC race bikes, but as DW has said the market is too small. Lose some weight and travel and adjust the geometry, and the Mojo is there. Still, there are other options - carbon Epic, Cannondale Scalpel, Turner Nitrous, Yeti ASR-SLC...

  7. #7
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    Geometry is not it

    Quote Originally Posted by boredwitless
    The Mojo does have a lot going for it - light weight and DW link - but in terms of geometry it's not aimed at XC racing. If you look, the geometry is very close to a Turner 5-spot. I own a 5-spot and it is no XC race bike, largely because of this. I've also ridden a Turner Nitrous, and that screams race bike, largely because of its geometry. When you're hammering along some flat double track at 25 mph trying to hold a wheel inches in front, or grinding up a mountain pass for two hours, these things matter. Only the original poster can decide on what is the right bike for their needs, but for this kind of racing you need to consider all options. E.g. with the new Cannondale Taurine, you could easily build a superlight, sub 20lb hardtail with a plush 4" fork. In terms of FS there is still more that can be done for XC race bikes, but as DW has said the market is too small. Lose some weight and travel and adjust the geometry, and the Mojo is there. Still, there are other options - carbon Epic, Cannondale Scalpel, Turner Nitrous, Yeti ASR-SLC...
    I own both a Mojo and a 5-spot (well .. the 5-spot is going on e-bay), and they come within small fractions of an inch in measurements; the 5-spot is quite a sluggish bike while the Mojo feels almost as brisk as my hardtail. You cannot compare bikes with different suspension systems based on geometry

    Especially for Marathons it will pay BIG dividends to have a modern geometry: what goes up must come down and long downhill after hours of climbing are not good with a 71 degrees front ...
    Last edited by Davide; 03-06-2007 at 07:08 PM.

  8. #8
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    I had a 06 epic comp & i kept a chart of average speed on certain trails. When i had a chance at the end of last year to try out my Mojo, i had a better avg speed than the epic. The trail is more XC type terrain. I mainly do XC riding but occasionly go to more rougher terrain & i wanted to feel more relaxed over longer rides.
    I went thru that" what is the best bike for me" thing and i am glad that I choose the Mojo!
    If anyone ask's me what bike to buy, I will sugest the Mojo. It's the best all around bike, unless you can afford to have 2 or 3 bikes.
    This all started when i was looking at a Carbon epic frame.(Big $$$$$)

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by scarsellone
    I had a 06 epic comp & i kept a chart of average speed on certain trails. When i had a chance at the end of last year to try out my Mojo, i had a better avg speed than the epic. The trail is more XC type terrain. I mainly do XC riding but occasionly go to more rougher terrain & i wanted to feel more relaxed over longer rides.
    I went thru that" what is the best bike for me" thing and i am glad that I choose the Mojo!
    If anyone ask's me what bike to buy, I will sugest the Mojo. It's the best all around bike, unless you can afford to have 2 or 3 bikes.
    This all started when i was looking at a Carbon epic frame.(Big $$$$$)
    Agree. Even though it's easier to go faster than any other XC bike, "relaxed" is the feeling when riding the Mojo. I'm no racer (I have an allergy to pain) but for endurance racing you wouldn't be racing 2 inches from another guys wheel except at maybe the starting few hundred yards.

    Some friends who used to race 24 Hours of Moab podiumed ahead of some pro teams a few times, and some of them rode Hecklers. The Mojo is much faster and better handling than a Heckler.

    A pro rider could win on the Mojo Carbon in XC short track to Super DH. (You'd set up the bike a lot stiffer and more stretched out for the XC sprints of course.)

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    but for endurance racing you wouldn't be racing 2 inches from another guys wheel except at maybe the starting few hundred yards.
    If it's the Transalp that's not true. I spent significant proportions of the race inches apart from my teammate and competitors. Other races can and will differ.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    Agree. Even though it's easier to go faster than any other XC bike, "relaxed" is the feeling when riding the Mojo. ...


    A pro rider could win on the Mojo Carbon in XC short track to Super DH. (You'd set up the bike a lot stiffer and more stretched out for the XC sprints of course.)
    I believe this statement, and if you are building the bike from the frame up, how much loss do you realize if you decide to sell the frame used? It seems worth the experiment to make mistakes in a hurry and converge on what you want quickly.

    "Buy a mojo now, put a tarmac friendly tire like a Crossmark on it and ride the heck out of it. Put some 3M film on it first if you plan to sell it."

    As a practice, to keep me from telling people what to do - like above - I often force myself to follow any advice I give. To avoid personal bankrupcy, here is a caveat.

    Three reasons to not buy a mojo are: 1) out of budget, 2) prefer less travel on the front or back, 3) want more cage places...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by clark
    how much loss do you realize if you decide to sell the frame used?
    "C&D's Dad" had his near new Mojo for sale in the MTBR Classifieds a few months ago as a complete bike for about $500 less than cost. Any used buyer would want a deal because there would be no original owner's warrantee (although after a few rides any warrantee problems would no longer arise, so there'd be no real risk of not having a warrantee.)

    Regarding a one bike races all events to win...

    It wouldn't take much time to convert to an XC sprinter from the stock 69/73 angles to 71/73 sprint race geometry. By swapping a 5.5 inch fork to a 3.65 - 4 inch SID and a seat already mounted to a layback post measured for the effective 73 degree position, and crank the RP23 propedal to firmest and boost the air pressure up for shorter travel and less sag and even more anti-squat suspension geometry. The BB would lower to 12 inches, just about perfect for XC racing. The only disadvantage is the Mojo with the same components may be up to 1/2 pound heavier in the frame than a ASR or Scalpel (I don't know if those frames are really that much lighter, they aren't as efficient pedaling or as flex free as the Mojo).

    For Enduro XC and 24 hour races, the geometry is pretty good as is, just adjust fork and rear platform to suit your style. (The exception as noted above would be racing the Trans Alp which must be mostly on smoother high traction surface that would favor the XC sprint set up.)

    Dual-Slalom and Mountain-X setup would be similar but swap to a stiff short travel fork.

    For Super-Downhill or Downhill courses like the pretty smooth Sea Otter DH course use an inch longer fork if the course is very steep or sandy. Swap cranks to double ring and add E13 chain guides, longer seat lowered some for handling but still good for seated pedaling.

    Dirt Jump X-Games? Swap to coil or air with no platform damping to suit the launch, and slam the seat all the way down.

    World Cup Downhill or Red Bull Virgin River extreme?? Find another manufacturer - until Ibis releases the Mojo Carbon FR/DH (just my hunch of what's possible). That frame could be made within 1.5 pounds of the current Mojo Carbon not including shock weight differences, and still be stronger and stiffer and more durable than any other freeride frame, so ballast could be added wherever the rider wanted for fine tuning balance.
    Last edited by derby; 03-10-2007 at 10:17 AM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by vintage
    Calling all Ibis owners, I plan to start riding Endurance and stage races this year as I have been a roadie for too long and am looking for a new challenge. At the moment I am considering the Trek Fuel EX9.5 and the Ibis Mojo.
    Note the angles on the Moj head/seat/chainstay/wheelbase is 69/73/16.89/42.7 verses 69.5/72/17/43 on medium frame (I think.)
    Consider relative frame cost also. I think you will pay at least 1000 more for a Fuel Ex 9.5 frame with faux 4 bar, but great lifetime guarantee. (I can attest to that having had many Trek's over the years.) But Ibis Mojo's new age suspension at 1" more travel at probably only 100 grams (or less ) weight penalty and full carbon frame design seems lite years ahead of the curve for the price, but only 3 years warranty.
    Disclaimer: I am just reviewing specs as I don't ride a mojo and one of my bikes is a Top Fuel Team Issue that I have raced enduro when allot of climbing is involved.
    Last edited by glovemtb; 03-15-2007 at 06:33 AM.

  14. #14
    Neg reppers r my biatches
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    no. it is a carbon frame. it will likely break before the end of the race

  15. #15
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    I have my Mojo set up as a 25lb sport/expert class racer. It has the Revelation 130 on the front with Poploc on the bars. My previous bike was a Rocky Mountain Element T.O. for 5 years, racing expert class, a great race bike and still used by some of the best racers on the Rocky Mountain squad.

    The Mojo feels faster and snappier than the Rocky. I sit more upright on the bike, yet I'm able to lay the power down more efficiently. But the thing that I feel makes it worthy of an endurance bike is that I feel much fresher and less fatigued (body, and legs) after a couple hours on the Mojo than I did on the Rocky. The Mojo seems to isolate you from the pounding and stresses, provides easy telepathic steering, and incredible pedalling efficiency, all adding up to less effort when you are tired. IMHO, it is the perfect endurance bike.

  16. #16
    holding back the darkness
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    no. it is a carbon frame. it will likely break before the end of the race
    Where do all these negative people come from? Bad experiences with carbon fiber as children? Carbon fiber is not, contrary to popular belief, made of pure concentrated evil. I have a friend that doesn't like carbon fiber either. He says he wouldn't trust it because it will break. He is 200lbs+ and rides with the grace of a cement truck. He breaks everything he rides. Consistently. Yeah.. maybe carbon fiber bikes aren't for people like him. But then again, maybe bikes in general aren't for people like him. If you're 250lbs and like to huck 25 footers onto flat surfaces, maybe something with some gussets and a motor and some AFLAC would be a better idea.
    For those of use that have mojos- we love them. The ride, the look, the overall ibis vibe. And for those of you that don't get that- hey, we aint hatin'.

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