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  1. #1
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    IBIS Mojo build thread

    For those unfamiliar with the company, http://www.ibiscycles.com/

    Long story short, it's a brand new DW-link designed MTB with carbon frame on 5.5" of travel front and rear.

    These should start shipping July 15-30.

    How are you configuring your bike?

    The frame uses an IS headset (no CK!) and a 31.6 seatpost.

    I decided to go full-custom and am still deciding on some of the parts, but I think I almost have a plan of action...

    Currently planning:

    Still a work in progress.

    Currently planning on:
    Fox 32 Talas '07 RLC
    '06 SRAM X.0 trigger
    XTR '06 960/'07 970 crank + integrated BB
    XTR '06 M961/'07 M971 F. Derailleur
    XTR '06 M960/'07 M970 Casette...still considering SRAM.
    '06 SRAM X.0 R. Derailleur, long cage
    FSA Orbit IS Carbon headset
    Thompson Elite X4 oversize stem
    Monkeylite XC carbon oversize 31.8 bars
    ODI ruffian lockon grips
    A Thompson masterpiece post
    WTB Laser V Stealth seat
    SRAM PC-991...probably just the basic version here...
    Lizard Skin chainstay protection
    Nokon red shifter cables
    Kenda 2.35 BG DTC front / Kenda 2.1 Nevagal DTC rear
    Salsa skewers

    Waiting for:
    Juicy Ultimate '07 - nice one piece caliper, adjustment, etc...The Juicy 7's are already avail...I'm torn.
    '07 XTR? I just hate the idea of the '06 proprietary cranks, but they are on closeout and cheap.
    '07 SRAM X.0 ??? Not sure I need to wait on this.

    Already rec'd:
    Industry Nine Enduro Wheels on DT 5.1d's 3 degree, tape
    Frame

    -Mark
    Last edited by mdavis; 08-09-2006 at 05:45 PM.

  2. #2
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    Good thread Mark. I decided to go with the SL kit. I was going to go custom, but the spec really impressed me, as did the complete bike weight. (or maybe I'm just getting lazy!) Anyway, Tom Morgan emailed me the following specs a few months back (one major change is that they will ship with the 07 Fox RP23 and 07' Float!

    Rear Derailleur
    Shimano
    REAR DERAILLEUR, XTR(98N) RD-M952 SGS 9-SPEED DIRECT ATTACHMENT BULK

    Front Derailleur
    Shimano
    FRONT DERAILLEUR, XTR(02) FD-M961 DOWN-SWING DUAL-PULL 34.9MM BAND, CS-ANGLE: 66-69, BULK

    Headset
    FSA
    Orbit IS, ACB w/25mm Custom Cone Spacer Option (H2088D)

    Cranks
    Shimano
    FRONT CHAINWHEEL, XTR(02) FC-M960 TWO PIECE TYPE CRANK, INCLUDE BBPARTS, HOLLOWTECH 175MM 44X32X24T, W/O CG, W/TL-FC16 & FC32, BULK

    Brakes
    Hayes
    HFX 9 Carbon V6 rotor (160mm) Silver w/carbon (Int'l std or post mount)

    Brakes
    Hayes
    HFX 9 Carbon V6 rotor (160mm) Silver w/carbon (Int'l std or post mount)

    Shift Levers
    Shimano
    XT Shifter Pod Left

    Shift Levers
    Shimano
    XT Shifter Pod Right

    Cassette
    Shimano
    CASSETTE SPROCKET, XTR(02) CS-M960 9-SPEED TI/NI-P COATED 11-13-15-17-20-23-26-30-34T(AS), BULK

    Chain
    Shimano
    XT CN-HG93 9 spd

    H/Bar
    Easton
    MonkeyLite XC CNT 26" 660mm Lo UD 31.8

    Stem
    Ibis
    Stem 120mm Ext., 31.8 Bar/28.6 Steerer Clamps 124g 7075, SB BLK ANODIZED W/O Logo

    Seat Post
    Easton
    EC90 Zero CNT 31.6 300mm Weave

    Saddle
    fi'zi:k
    Aliante Gamma Black leather Titanium black

    Grips
    VELO
    PP+FIBER BLACK/GEL BLACK + ALUM CLAMP 130MM

    Wheels
    Easton
    XC1 Wheelset

    Tires
    Hutchinson
    BULLDOG AIR LIGHT-26x2.30/33 FB-Black

    Tires
    Hutchinson
    BULLDOG AIR LIGHT-26x2.30/33 FB-Black

    Tubes
    Maxxis
    Ultralight 26x1.90/2.125 Presta

    Tubes
    Maxxis
    Ultralight 26x1.90/2.125 Presta

    Fork
    Fox
    Float RLC

    Shock
    Fox
    Float RP3 **

  3. #3
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    Here are the specs I rec'd from Tom this week. He said he would update the specs on the website soon as well.

    MTB SL:

    Rear DerailleurShimano REAR DERAILLEUR, XTR(98N) RD-M952 SGS 9-SPEED DIRECT ATTACHMENT BULK
    Front Derailleur ShimanoFRONT DERAILLEUR, XTR(02) FD-M961 DOWN-SWING DUAL-PULL 34.9MM BAND
    Headset FSAOrbit IS, ACB w/25mm Custom Cone Spacer Option (H2088D)
    Cranks ShimanoFRONT CHAINWHEEL, XTR(02) FC-M960 INC. BB PARTS, HOLLOWTECH 175MM 44X32X24T,
    Brakes HayesHFX 9 Carbon V6 rotor (160mm) Silver w/carbon (Int'l std or post mount)
    Brakes HayesHFX 9 Carbon V6 rotor (160mm) Silver w/carbon (Int'l std or post mount)
    Shift LeversShimanoXT Shifter Pod Left
    Shift LeversShimanoXT Shifter Pod Right
    Cassette ShimanoCASSETTE SPROCKET, XTR(02) CS-M960 9-SPEED TI/NI-P COATED 11-13-15-17-20-23-26-30-34T(AS), BULK
    Chain ShimanoXT CN-HG93 9 spd
    H/Bar EastonMonkeyLite XC CNT 26" 660mm Lo UD 31.8StemIbis
    Stem 120mm Ext., 31.8 Bar/28.6 Steerer Clamps 7075, SB BLK ANODIZED W/O Logo
    Seat PostEastonEC90 Zero CNT 31.6 300mm Weave
    Saddle fi'zi:kAliante Gamma Black leather Titanium black
    Grips VELOPP+FIBER BLACK/GEL BLACK + ALUM CLAMP 130MM
    Wheels EastonXC1 Wheelset
    Tires KendaNevegal DTC - 26 x 2.1
    Tires KendaNevegal DTC - 26 x 2.1
    Tubes MaxxisUltralight 26x1.90/2.125Presta
    Tubes MaxxisUltralight 26x1.90/2.125Presta
    Fork FoxFloat RLCShockFoxFloat RP23 **

    MTB SX:

    Rear DerailleurSRAMX-9 Rear derailleur long cage
    Front Derailleur SRAMX-Gen Front derailleur / silver / diam 34.9 / top pull
    Cranks FSANew Afterburner MegaExo, Hollow Forged, Alloy Spider, 68/73mm BB 175mm Length x 104/64mm BCD x 44/32/22
    Headset FSAOrbit IS, ACB w/25mm Custom Cone Spacer Option (H2088D)
    'Brakes HayesHFX 9 V6 rotor (160mm) Black or Grey (Int'l std or Post mount)
    Brakes HayesHFX 9 V6 rotor (160mm) Black or Grey (Int'l std or Post mount)
    Shift Levers SRAMX-9 Trigger shifter front
    Shift Levers SRAMX-9 Trigger shifter 9-speed rear
    Cassette SRAMPG-970 MTB Cassette11-34
    Chain KMC1/2 X 11/128 X 110 LINKS SILVER/GRAY
    H/Bar IbisDH 31.8 AL-7075 T6 42mm Rise, 4 x 9 deg bend, 660 mm wide, SP Ano Blk, w/o Logo, 270g
    Stem Ibis Stem 120mm Ext., 31.8 Bar/28.6 Steerer Clamps 7075, SB BLK ANODIZED W/O Logo
    Seat Post Ibis31.6 x 350 L, 7075 SB BLK ANODIZED w/o Logo
    Saddle fi'zi:kAliante Gamma Black leather Titanium black
    WheelsMavicCROSSRIDE Silver, Pair - Int'l 6-Bolt
    Tires KendaNevegal DTC - 26 x 2.1
    Tires KendaNevegal DTC - 26 x 2.1
    Tubes Maxxis26x2.125Presta
    Tubes Maxxis26x2.125Presta
    GripsVELOPP+FIBER BLACK/GEL BLACK + ALUM CLAMP 130MM
    Fork FoxFloat RLShockFoxFloat RP23 **

    Regards, Mark
    Last edited by mdavis; 07-12-2006 at 05:33 PM.

  4. #4
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    I'm glad to find this thread. I am interested to see people's builds and impressions when their frames arrive.

    I have a small Mojo coming (hopefully August).

    I like the Ibis SL build but decided I would go custom mainly because I want adjustable travel like the Talas (I do alot of climbing) and don't want an XTR crankset. Also I wasn't sure about the Easton wheelset. It's light, but is it good and can it be converted to tubeless? I don't know. I considered going with the Maverick DUC32 fork, but I contacted Maverick and they say it won't work as it needs a minimum 130mm headtube/headset stack height. So it may work on a large or x-large Mojo.

    I have a question about the FSA Orbit IS headset that is included with complete builds. The headset is readily available but not the 25mm Custom Cone Spacer. Will the Orbit IS work (or maybe Orbit Carbon IS with a 15mm spacer), or is there a unique installation requirement with the Mojo frame?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    I'm glad to find this thread. I am interested to see people's builds and impressions when their frames arrive.

    I have a small Mojo coming (hopefully August).

    I like the Ibis SL build but decided I would go custom mainly because I want adjustable travel like the Talas (I do alot of climbing) and don't want an XTR crankset. Also I wasn't sure about the Easton wheelset. It's light, but is it good and can it be converted to tubeless? I don't know. I considered going with the Maverick DUC32 fork, but I contacted Maverick and they say it won't work as it needs a minimum 130mm headtube/headset stack height. So it may work on a large or x-large Mojo.

    I have a question about the FSA Orbit IS headset that is included with complete builds. The headset is readily available but not the 25mm Custom Cone Spacer. Will the Orbit IS work (or maybe Orbit Carbon IS with a 15mm spacer), or is there a unique installation requirement with the Mojo frame?
    What is this custom cone spacer? Is it just a top headset cup with a taller lip? So you don't have to use a spacer? My friend's cheapy Diamondback has this kind of headset, and I was planning on using an integrated headset for my Mojo.

  6. #6
    flow where ever you go
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    Another question I have is what size bottom bracket? 68 or 73??

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    Another question I have is what size bottom bracket? 68 or 73??
    I don't know. Guess it never mattered since my bb/crank fits both 68 and 73mm (xt 760) via shell spacers.

  8. #8
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    from Scot

    Frame does not come with a headset.
    One is available for $50
    It will be either the FSA Orbit IS or the Cane Creek HSS0247- IS-2i
    So the Mojo uses the Integrated Standard.
    No special spacer or cup needed. The stock headset will work.
    Scot

  9. #9
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    OK, so it uses the Integrated Standard, but is it Campagnolo or Cane Creek Worldwide

    Maybe it is because I am new to integrated headsets, but Westin's answer from Scot confuses me more.

    Doesn't the designation IS-2i on the Cane Creek model signify the Campagnolo integrated standard http://www.canecreek.com/is-2.html and isn't that standard different than the "Cane Creek IS worldwide standard" used on the Cane Creek IS-2 (without an "i") and on the FSA Orbit IS headset. According to the Park Tool website, the two standards are not interchangable. http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=68

    I hope I am missing something here and it is not so complicated to understand the answer Scot gave.

    If the Cane Creek IS worldwide standard is what we want, then we should be able to use Cane Creek Solos IS, IS-2, IS-6, or IS-8..........RIGHT???

  10. #10
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    Howdy Boys: Yes you are right, the Mojo uses the Cane Creek IS Standard. And yes, any of those headsets will work.
    I gave Westin bad part number info on that Cane Creek headset, sorry about that. We were changing some spec and I made a boo boo. The actual part number is Cane Creek HSS0243- IS-2. No "i" at the end.
    Also note that the Ibis Road bike-the Silk Carbon-uses the Campy standard (which does have an "i" at the end.
    Also, to clarify one of the specs that Tom sent to someone above, the "custom cone spacer" we send out with the FSA is not really custom, that's just the word FSA used in their description.

    Thanks for the thread any for paying attention. We're redoing the website right now, and the new launch will have all this spec info, sorry it's not up there yet.

    Oh yes to answer the inevitable question of why we use two different headset standards, the Campy standard on the road bike allows those who want to build the bike up with a full Campy group to do so. And on the mountain bike, the IS headsets are a little more widely available.

  11. #11
    flow where ever you go
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    now for bottom bracket dimensions

    Whew!,

    Finally, headsets on Mojos, clear as a bell. Thanks .


    Still going to need bottom bracket size: 68 or 73mm, 108 or 113mm?

    Scot? Anyone?
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 07-18-2006 at 03:59 PM.

  12. #12
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    Talus Upgrade

    Noshortscuts,

    Tom from Ibis writing you. I wanted to note a couple of things for you:

    First, we plan on offering the Talus fork as an upgrade for roughly $100 retail.

    Second, I have been using the Easton wheels personly for a few months and have found them very reliable. It should be noted that I am on the north side of 200 lbs and ride with all the finesse of an elephant. The XC-1 wheels are not tubeless ready, but they should work with a Stan's kit. I haven't tried that yet, so I don't know for sure.

    Finally, the tooling for the small Mojo was the last to be completed - had some problems with the file transfer to the factory, and as a result will be the last size produced. Right now I would say September for the first delivery of the smalls.

    Thanks for supporting the new Ibis. I know that you're going to love Mojo when you get it.

    -Tom[/LIST]
    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    I'm glad to find this thread. I am interested to see people's builds and impressions when their frames arrive.

    I have a small Mojo coming (hopefully August).

    I like the Ibis SL build but decided I would go custom mainly because I want adjustable travel like the Talas (I do alot of climbing) and don't want an XTR crankset. Also I wasn't sure about the Easton wheelset. It's light, but is it good and can it be converted to tubeless? I don't know. I considered going with the Maverick DUC32 fork, but I contacted Maverick and they say it won't work as it needs a minimum 130mm headtube/headset stack height. So it may work on a large or x-large Mojo.

    I have a question about the FSA Orbit IS headset that is included with complete builds. The headset is readily available but not the 25mm Custom Cone Spacer. Will the Orbit IS work (or maybe Orbit Carbon IS with a 15mm spacer), or is there a unique installation requirement with the Mojo frame?

  13. #13
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    The bb is 68.
    The crank length depends on the crankset, XTR doesn't even spell out a length for us, as the spindle is attached to the arm.
    scot

  14. #14
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    Mojo in the house yet?

    Scott or Tom,
    Have the first batch of Mojos (medium or large) arrived from customs yet? Inquiring minds want to know.

    Thanks

  15. #15
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    They are en route, that's what we know now. Could be any second now, but we're at their mercy...

  16. #16
    Too Much Fun
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    Dear Scoot,

    Quote Originally Posted by Scot Nicol
    They are en route, that's what we know now. Could be any second now, but we're at their mercy...
    Will my new Ibis Ti Alibi Recumbent 29'er be coming with this shipment as well? I paid you my sheckles so long ago...



    Love,
    Quiggly Down Under

    ps: Can't wait to see the new rigs!
    - -benja- -

  17. #17
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    Guys, let's try to keep this thread on topic. We need a separate thread titled "Where is my Mojo?" :-)

    How are you configuring your IBIS Mojo?

    We've learned the BB is 68mm, the headset is the Cane Creek IS Std, great...

    As you can see from my build, there were a few changes I wanted to make vs. SL:

    1. Talas...which I guess we can now get in a build...
    2. Avid ultimate brakes...
    3. I9 wheels
    4. SRAM trigger + XTR combo
    5. Saddle
    6. Post/Stem/Bar differences

    I'm still torn on Al post/bar vs. Carbon...Also, in the waiting game on the '07 XTR...may have to go with '06.

  18. #18
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    Cool-blue Rhythm REVISED (again) planned build, now complete me thinks

    Rear Derailleur: X.0
    Front Derailleur: FD-M961
    Headset: Cane Creek Solos CHANGE to: Token Carbon Omega C1, 20mm spacer
    Cranks: FSA Pro Team Carbon
    Bottom Bracket: FSA Platinum Pro MegaQuad Ti
    Brakes: Magura Marta SL
    Shift Levers: X.0 gripshift
    Cassette: XTR
    Chain: 991 hollowpin
    Pedals: PD-M540
    H/Bar: CHANGE to: Salsa Pro Moto Carbon Riser Handlebar 31.8
    Stem: Thomson X4
    Seat Post: Thomson setback
    Saddle: Fizik Nisene Ti
    Grips: Ruffian lockon gripshift length
    Wheels: CHANGE to: ZTR 355 with King ISO rear and Hope front and CXray spokes
    Tires: Kenda DTC Karma 2.0 rear and 2.2 front
    Tubes: NOT (Stan's)
    Fork: Pace RC41 Fighter
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 09-13-2006 at 11:02 AM. Reason: Plan has changed a bit

  19. #19
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    noshortcuts-

    1. Why Magura Marta SL vs. Avid Carbon / '07 Ultimate?
    2. Why Race Face Next SL vs. Monkey XC Carbon?
    3. Fizik Nisene vs. WTB Stealth ?
    4. FSA Pro Team Carbon vs. XTR...I assume it's the proprietary nonsense with Shimano? I'm also still considering FSA.
    5. How much weight do you save with the hollowpin? I was told the durability suffers...

    -Mark

  20. #20
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    Mark-

    1. Marta SL because I got a good deal (400) and they are very good and light brakes.
    2. Race Face because the SL is exremely light and strong and feels good.... and because the last Easton I bought was too large on one end. It took weeks of efforts to get Easton to reply as a warranty issue. (the Alpha Q is considered because it can be cut and take barends)
    3. fizik because I have one, it's held up, it's fairly light and it's comfortable for me.
    4. No XTR crank because rings are fairly soft and replacement rings are sooo expensive.... plus I got a new FSA for $190 and it gets good reviews.
    5. I don't know the weight savings on the hollowpin and don't have enough miles on one to have an opinion on durability.

  21. #21
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    I'm going with the Ibis designer SX build at first (with a shorter 80 to 90mm stem). I want to first see how Ibis wants the bike to ride and then swap some parts I have.

    I'll buy a new coil rear shock, probably a PUSH platform-removed Vanilla-R, or DHX 5.0 Coil, or Rocco to compare, and then sell the RP23. I've got lighter high end wheels (Mavix x3.1 UST) with better hubs (Hope Bulbs), and a Nixon Elite coil fork w/ rapid wind down 115 - 145mm travel with firm spring for my ~200+ weight.

    I plan to run coil front and rear unless the bike is just as smooth and very low maintenance with the stock air spring spec (unlikely). Iíve always found that coil is well worth the weight, but I havenít ridden the RP23 or í07 Float-R or Talas forks yet, maybe the choppy suspension feeling from platform and stiction of the í06 Fox air versions is removed now (but I doubt it). All my Tracer's XTR, Raceface, Tompson, Mavic, and Koski parts will fit (except headset, seat collar, and shorter rear coil Vanilla-R shock). Planning on keeping my Tracer with swapped out lesser parts to allow others to test ride my Mojo and still have a top quality bike to ride (and cover down time for any warrantee or repair issues).

    Rear DerailleurSRAMX-9 Rear derailleur long cage
    Front Derailleur SRAMX-Gen Front derailleur / silver / diam 34.9 / top pull
    Cranks FSANew Afterburner MegaExo, Hollow Forged, Alloy Spider, 68/73mm BB 175mm Length x 104/64mm BCD x 44/32/22
    Headset FSAOrbit IS, ACB w/25mm Custom Cone Spacer Option (H2088D)
    'Brakes HayesHFX 9 V6 rotor (160mm) Black or Grey (Int'l std or Post mount)
    Brakes HayesHFX 9 V6 rotor (160mm) Black or Grey (Int'l std or Post mount)
    Shift Levers SRAMX-9 Trigger shifter front
    Shift Levers SRAMX-9 Trigger shifter 9-speed rear
    Cassette SRAMPG-970 MTB Cassette11-34
    Chain KMC1/2 X 11/128 X 110 LINKS SILVER/GRAY
    H/Bar IbisDH 31.8 AL-7075 T6 42mm Rise, 4 x 9 deg bend, 660 mm wide, SP Ano Blk, w/o Logo, 270g
    Stem Ibis Stem 120mm Ext., 31.8 Bar/28.6 Steerer Clamps 7075, SB BLK ANODIZED W/O Logo
    Seat Post Ibis31.6 x 350 L, 7075 SB BLK ANODIZED w/o Logo
    Saddle fi'zi:kAliante Gamma Black leather Titanium black
    WheelsMavicCROSSRIDE Silver, Pair - Int'l 6-Bolt
    Tires KendaNevegal DTC - 26 x 2.1
    Tires KendaNevegal DTC - 26 x 2.1
    Tubes Maxxis26x2.125Presta
    Tubes Maxxis26x2.125Presta
    GripsVELOPP+FIBER BLACK/GEL BLACK + ALUM CLAMP 130MM
    Fork FoxFloat RLShockFoxFloat RP23 **

  22. #22
    flow where ever you go
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    Considering Pace RC41.... 130mm or 150mm?

    There are so many long travel forks to consider for the Mojo, and more coming all the time. Lately I am considering Pace. Pace is now distributing their light and strong forks in the USA.

    The Pace RC41 comes in 130mm / 5.1" Xcam version OR the 150mm / 5.9" Fighter version. Each is near 3.5 lbs.

    For an extra 0.8" of travel the Fighter is 0.6" longer (509mm -v- 524mm).

    I imagine either length would work well with the Mojo's 5.5" rear suspension but am not sure if one would be a better fit. Since I will be on a small frame and 130mm has worked for me in the past, that may be my route.

    Anybody else going 150mm or bigger. Any thoughts on fork length considerations for the Mojo.

    -EDIT-, add:
    After looking closer, I see these forks have lockout but not adjustable travel. Since I do alot of hill work and appreciate adjustable travel, I might better look at the Pace RC40-Xcam. It is coil sprung, adjustabl travel 130 to 100mm, and still a hair under 4lbs.
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 08-01-2006 at 02:26 PM.

  23. #23
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    any pics?

  24. #24
    Mojo Rider
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    Medium Mojo
    Fox 32 140mm Talas RLC (3 clicks - love it)
    Fox RP23 rear (very effective)
    Syntace 90 mm 5 deg. stem
    EC50 Riser MonkeyBar
    X-Gen front Derailleur
    X.9 rear w/ long cage
    SRAM 991 rear cassette
    SRAM 991 chain
    Avid Juicy 7s w/ 180 rotors front and back
    Shimano XT Hollowtech w/ Phill Wood rebuild Bottom Bracket
    Race Face Team chain rings (22,32,44)
    Toothfairy chainring Bashguard
    SRAM X-0 trigger shifters
    Mavic CrossMAX XL wheels and hubs
    Kenda 2.35 Blur Groove up front and 2.1 Navegal rear (with tubes)
    Gravity Dropper Seatpost w/ 4"/3"/0" three position drop
    Specialized BG Avatar saddle
    Pedals switch between Time Attak Carbon and Welgo Magnesium Platforms
    Avid Flak Jacket cables (all cables trimmed after this photo).

    With all this heavy equiment, comes in just under 29 bls.

    However, even at this weight, it climbs so much better then my 30 lbs Blur. Much better suspension design. I love the DW-Link. Also go down like a Nomad. I am in love with this bike. Only one ride under my belt so far, but love at first ride.



    Last edited by zrymland; 08-03-2006 at 10:01 AM.

  25. #25
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    Interesting.

  26. #26
    Mojo0115
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    does anyone have any thoughts about running the mavic duc 32 fork up front? It seems like it would be a good match.

  27. #27
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    Like I posted in another section and I nag scot about every other week or so, I've had all the parts for a few months now and am just waiting on my Large RP23 frame ( judging by the pictures and the head mans suggestion it looks like a good frame size choice for me).

    I'm a bit of a not so old schooler and have many of the same parts on all my Ibis Ti rides in the past...



    Rear Derailleur: XTR RD-M952
    Front Derailleur: XTR FD-M961
    Headset: Cane Creek intefrated (IS-6?)
    Cranks: Mint Race Face Next LP Carbon black compact
    Bottom Bracket: FSA Platinum Pro MegaQuad Ti
    Brakes: Avid Juicy Carbon 160mm
    Shift Levers: XTR sl-M952
    Cables Avid flak jacket
    Cassette: XTR CS952
    Chain: XTR
    Pedals: 959's Builit proof!
    H/Bar: Race Face Next SL
    Stem: undecidied but I have a Ti moots removeable face for now to try
    Seat Post: N.O.S. Titaium syncros ( e-bay--score!)
    Saddle: sella trans am Ti
    Grips: pedros balckwall
    Wheels: Mavic xc717( silver) w/ Blue CK iso hubs ( another e-bay purchase)
    Skewers: standard suspension salsa flip-off's!
    Tires: Hutchinsoin Python 2.3's
    Tubes: performance ulta or lunar light ( saturday morning speacials here in boulder)
    Fork: FOX FloatTXX ( maybe I'll drive up to loveland and PUSH it later on)

    I'm sure I could go lighter but this will be my primary bike in the montains and I'll continue to ride my 24.5# bowti, 23.5# silk-ti, 18.5# Ti mojo SS here in the front range and foothills.
    I've ridden nothing but the silkie since it's completion last fall and I love it, so the carbon mojo will have to impress...

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by zrymland

    With all this heavy equiment, comes in just under 29 bls.

    However, even at this weight, it climbs so much better then my 30 lbs Blur. Much better suspension design. I love the DW-Link. Also go down like a Nomad. I am in love with this bike. Only one ride under my belt so far, but love at first ride.

    Yippee! A completed Mojo build!! Looks great.

    I am surprised your kit is up to 29 lbs. Did you weigh the frame seperately to see where you started?

    Ride on.

  29. #29
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    I should have weighed the frame first. It sure felt light. Lighter than my Blur frame.

    My scale may be off. I'll weigh again at LBS and give update.

  30. #30
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    29lbs sounds high to me too based on the carbon mojo weight quotes from the boys at ibis, I'd say get a second opinion from another scale...

  31. #31
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    Just weighed a med. on a digital scale, 5lbs. 13ozs. On the same scale a med 5-Spot weighs 6lbs 5ozs, med Flux 5lbs 7ozs for comparason.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by zzsean
    does anyone have any thoughts about running the mavic duc 32 fork up front? It seems like it would be a good match.
    I too thought it might be a good match. I asked Maverick about it and found it won't work for small and medium Mojo frames. Maverick said it needs a minimum 130mm headtube/headset stack height (spacers don't count). So it seems it may still be a good match for some people on a large or x-large Mojo. Alas, that's not me.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    I too thought it might be a good match. I asked Maverick about it and found it won't work for small and medium Mojo frames. Maverick said it needs a minimum 130mm headtube/headset stack height (spacers don't count). So it seems it may still be a good match for some people on a large or x-large Mojo. Alas, that's not me.
    awesome, thanks for the update. I think I will go that path as I will be on a large mojo come the next batch. :crosses fingers:.

  34. #34
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    Just curious, What shop was able to supply you with a Med. frameset?

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by buggymancan
    Just curious, What shop was able to supply you with a Med. frameset?

    I got mine at Sun Bikes in Milpitas, CA. But it was the only one they got and they said they would not get another until the end of the year.

  36. #36
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    man, those mojos are hard to find.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by buggymancan
    Just curious, What shop was able to supply you with a Med. frameset?
    Ummmmm, RTR Cycles in Anchorage Ak.................

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by R.T.R.
    Just weighed a med. on a digital scale, 5lbs. 13ozs. On the same scale a med 5-Spot weighs 6lbs 5ozs, med Flux 5lbs 7ozs for comparason.
    Don't things weigh less in AK cuz it's so far from the equator? Rick? Or is it cuz you're closer to the sun up there in the great white north?
    --Chuck

  39. #39
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    My Mojo build

    This build was contemplated over the last 8 months since I ordered my Med frame. I've had some of these parts sitting in a Rubbermaid bin for so long that they are now outdated I've paid alot of attention to the final colour scheme. All Red, Black, and Carbon. The weights are approx and might not be exact so don't get on my back if you think they are off a bit

    Since I had so much time to buy the parts, I was able to wait for killer deals on everything... closeouts, eBay bargains etc, so the whole build is coming in quite cheap compared to a stock package. I did blow the budget on the wheels though

    One area of concern is the crankset. I have listed a Standard 24-34-46 carbon crank. I read that Ibis recommends a compact. I prefer the gearing of the standard rings, but can swap to a compact (by changing the spyder on these cranks) if i run into clearance issues. I have the compact spyder ready if needed.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by MJ51; 08-03-2006 at 07:54 AM.

  40. #40
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    It's in the shop now (Over the Edge, Fruita, CO.) Being built up to ship today!

    Stoked!!!

    For other's preordered from OTE, they are still waiting for more to arrive.
    Last edited by derby; 08-11-2006 at 11:08 PM.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scot Nicol
    Don't things weigh less in AK cuz it's so far from the equator? Rick? Or is it cuz you're closer to the sun up there in the great white north?
    --Chuck
    Actually it's the " Northern Lights " effect

  42. #42
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    Got my Large Mojo yesterday...mounted as of today

    Cane Creek Solos Internal
    Project 321 Lefty Adapter
    140mm Carbon Lefty
    Silver Masterpiece post
    WTB Rocket Team Ti
    I9 Enduros

    Coming...

    Hope M4s
    5.1 tubless strips
    Conti Vertical Pro USTs
    90mmx10deg Thomson X4
    Raceface NEXT sl lower riser
    XO triggers/shifters
    Last edited by 0700; 08-19-2006 at 05:59 PM.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by MJ51

    One area of concern is the crankset. I have listed a Standard 24-34-46 carbon crank. I read that Ibis recommends a compact. I prefer the gearing of the standard rings, but can swap to a compact (by changing the spyder on these cranks) if i run into clearance issues. I have the compact spyder ready if needed.

    I would deffinitely go with the compact setup 22-32-44 on the Mojo... The cliearence is very tight and if you get chain suck the chain already get stuck up there. At least with a simple back pedel motion the chain comes right out with the campact setup, but I think with a full size you will have issues.

  44. #44
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    Rear Derailleur: SRAM X.9 long cage
    Front Derailleur: Shimano XTR FD-M961
    Shift Levers: SRAM X.0 trigger
    Brakes: Magura Louise
    Headset: Cane Creek Solos
    Stem: Ritchey WSC
    Cranks: Shimano XTR
    Bottom Bracket: integrated with XTR cranks
    Cassette: Sram 990 11-34
    Chain: SRAM 991 hollowpin
    Pedals: Shimano 959
    H/Bar: 31.8 Easton EC70 Monkeylight carbon
    Seat Post: Easton EC70 carbon
    Wheels: Mavic crossmax XL
    Tires: Kenda Karma 2.3 Nevegal rear, Kenda Karma 2.3 front
    Fork: adjustable travel. Fox 32 Tala RLC 140mm

    I can't wait for it to arrive early september!

  45. #45
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    MJ51- Post some pictures of your build...

    -mark

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdavis
    MJ51- Post some pictures of your build...

    -mark
    Will do... but no frame yet

  47. #47
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    Here are some pics I took at Sea Otter this year - drool worthy stuff for those of you waiting for your frames (even for those of you who aren't)







  48. #48
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    MOJO Riding Impressions / Pics

    Hi all, I'm re-posting this from another thread....

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I picked it up yesterday and was able to get in a nice 2 hour ride. Thought I'd share some overall impressions. First off, it is a stunning bike to look at, even moreso in person. The owner of the shop, who has seen just about every bike imaginable, was amazed. He said he didn't know if I should ride it or hang it on the wall as art. The carbon work is just awesome. BTW, the rear triangle might even be more impressive than the front.

    Details: The bike comes with a nice manual. Not that general manual you always get with your bike, the 'always wear a helmet when you ride' crap. Ibis provides a nice overview of the bike, how to set it up, how to care for it, how the Fox suspension works with the Mojo, etc. A small thing, but a great touch IMO. Sweet Ibis stem (possibly made by Syntace?), a stainless steel stay protector, included vinyl protectors to prevent cable rub, cool new '4 Ibis' logo on the seat tube (maybe representing the 4 owners?).

    Ride: I have always wanted to ride a DW-link and compare it to my 4-bar ellsworth Id. Both are set up at 5.5 inches of travel and have a lightweight trail build, so this is a great comparison. The Id weighs a respectable 27.68 pounds, the Mojo comes in at 26.34 pounds (with the SL build and Shimano 959s). 2 hours is hardly a season of riding, but these 2 bikes are very different. The Mojo definitely pedals more efficiently. With the Id, I feel like I have 5.5 inches of travel, and not always in a good way. The Mojo feels almost race-like. The travel is there, but only when you need it. It climbs like a rocket...I set the RP23 at level 1 (there's also a 2 and 3, but I never needed them) and the rear stiffens with every pedal stroke. It almost felt like a hardtail. VPP and DW-link riders already know this I'm sure, but having never ridden either, this is entirely new to me. In between climbing and descending is that thing called flow and the Mojo gets you there easily. This is why I ride....to get to that place in the ride where your working hard, but don't know it. I rode my favorite section of trail 4 times just to keep experiencing this. There are not a lot of descents on this trail, but the Mojo seemed to handle them fine. (I flipped the RP23 to 'open' (propedal off, basically) and this really makes a big difference going downhill. This bike rips, plain and simple.
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  49. #49
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    ... and if we just ... First ride report

    I rode my Mojo Carbon with SX build for the first time last night.

    First, a special thanks to Troy Rarick and the expert mechanics at Over the Edge Sports in Fruita, CO, for the easy business handling and personal attention to getting this bike to me. Shipping to Cali was $150.

    But before the first ride I mounted the wheels and tires off my Tracer. And it was good to use my familiar tires Mutanoraptor 2.4’s tubeless with Stans sealant off my Tracer to gain a close comparison of the traction and handling differences. The SX build’s silver Mavic CrossRides with Nevegal 2.1 tires are as light as my older self built (Mavic x3.1 UST, Hope Bulb, DT2.0, alloy nips) but flexier and half the hub engagement rate, 18 vs. 36 per revolution. My black wheels really make the Mojo look much better in my opinion, the contrast of silver wheels looked low end and out of place on the beautifully finished near black carbon rag frame.

    I stopped many times to adjust fit and shock pressure. I rode pavement 2 miles from home to a local trail (Tamarancho) with many switchbacks and a wide variety of conditions. Once I got the fit issues settled down pretty well it was apparent how well balanced the bike handles. The (OEM only) ‘07 Float-RL fork and RP23 are very well balanced together. With RP23 Propedal lever in the "off" position the bike pedals better than my Tracer, no squish or wallow at all, very efficient in any ring and gear and, and like all the other DW-Links I've ridden, no detectable pedal kickback at all in any gear (the Tracer is rather low in pedal bob without a platform shock but unlike the Mojo and other dw-Links I've ridden the Tracer does has a very slight bit of kickback feel hitting sharper rocks in the granny's lower gears).

    Only the fork bobbed while standing pedaling. I was well under the recommended pressure to achive 25% sag and near full travel, I imagine the ‘07 Float-RL air pressure will come up when the fork is more fully broken in, it is moderatly sticky as new. I’m still fooling with air pressure optimization for sure, but ended up last night with 10 pounds under the recommended 90% body weight for the RP23, still never used the last 1.5 inches of suspension travel. Less pressure allowed too much sag for climbing geometry (I’ll be replacing the air shock and fork with coil types for better balance of sag and travel and better traction and ride quality.) It appears the Mojo has a similar problem as my Tracer did of not gaining full travel using a Float type air shock like the RP23 is based on, perhaps an AVA sleeve or DHX Air would produce full travel with optimum sag. The lack of full travel on the Tracer with air is only for heavier riders, average weight and lighter riders could get full travel which may be thee same with the Mojo using Float/RP23 type shocks. More ride time is needed to know for sure, I wasn't riding it as hard as I can on that first ride.

    The air suspension worked better than I expected, Fox has really reduced the stiction issue since I last spend extended time on air with my 2001 FloatRL the first year on my Tracer before going to a Vanilla-R. But there is slower compression damping than I like even with no Propedal, it has a dead feeling, I kind of prefer a slight wallow and more liquid and lively rhythmic handling feel. But I need to ride this combo more, it may break in to be smoother, and perhaps it is really better with more compression than I prefer. My coiled Tracer even with 4 inch travel (actually 4.5 inch travel now with Nixon and Uzzi-SL link) is smoother over smaller gravely conditions, but the Mojo with air match in smoothness quality with any real hits and rough trail and was the extended deep travel is much more plush on bigger hits, and smoother in every way above a about 10mph. I still want to get a coil rear and swap my coil Nixon Elite form the Tracer to the Mojo. I think the ride will be even better.

    Handling and braking is superb so far, better than the Tracer is downhill, more stable in direction, with slightly slacker head angle and same seat angle as the Tracer’s short wheelbase 4 inch setting. And much stability advantage of the Mojo is because of the near 1 inch lower BB height. I measured the Mojo BB height at 13.0 inches with the new OEM wheels and tires, pretty low for so much travel. I did scrape pedals a few times that almost never occurred with the Tracer due to the Mojo’s lower BB height, but not as much as I expected, I guess due to no pedal bobbing. Rear braking is as stable and high traction equaling the superb rear braking of the Tracer, which has the best rear braking traction of any trail bike I’ve ever ridden.

    The Sram 9.0 shifting was very easy, and getting familiar to only using thumb will come quickly, but I prefer Shimano’s thumb-finger Rapid-Fire for better ergonomics and quickness up and down. The Sram 1:1 cable pull really makes good sense for closer spaced 9-speed precision. I'm coming from 8-speed and the wider range of gears is nice. I do want to get better brake levers, I'm used to the flat face of Avid Ultimate levers I've used for 6+ years, flat faces spread out finger pressure and allow for more powerful pressure without biting into the fingers, after all these years I wonder why Hayes hasn't made flat faces standard, must be weight vs. stiffness vs. cost to produce stiff flat faced levers.

    When picking it up while tired after the ride the air suspended Mojo feels like it's at least 2 pounds lighter than my 28 pound coiled Tracer, it is very light, although the weight difference isn't so noticeable while riding except the Mojo does want to jump up short climbs with greater ease. Launching both wheels is very balanced, and bunny-hopping or manualing the front end up is very easy.

    Pictures to follow (when I ever get my camera back from warrantee repair).

    In one word the Mojo ride is AWESOME! Also a few more… superbly balanced, very light and low flex, quick and stable handling, and with perfect efficiency. This ride confirmed to me it's the very best trail bike in the world now.



    - ray
    Last edited by derby; 08-12-2006 at 10:09 AM.

  50. #50
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    I have a Mojo comming in September and the build is as follows.
    I might point out some custom stuff.
    First I am having a twist shifter put on the front derailer so I can trim the chain and keep it from rubbing. The rear gets a trigger shifter.
    Second the seat post is a Maverick Speedball, it has a lever under the seat so my dashboard stays cleaner, and the seat drops to any level down to 3 inches for any type of riding , and weighs in at about 14 oz.
    I have also requested the shop to use solid cable runs to keep the lines cleaner and dirt free.
    I am wondering if I should put out the extra bucks for a Talas shock so I can drop the front an inch and a half or so for climbing, any mojo owners care to advise?
    The rear derailer is an Sram X9 I have an X9 on my current bike now and like it but wonder if the MOJO rates a higher grade component.
    I went with a Specialized saddle for the comfort and protection it provides for the prostrate, it is the only saddle I have used that allowes me to ride all day without majior pain and discomfort.

    Frame: Ibis Mojo Carbon with RP3 shock
    Front Fork: 07 Float 140 RLC
    Headset: Cane Creek S-3 1-1/8
    Brakes: Avid Juicy 7 Hyd Disc 7"
    Stem: Thompson Stem X-4 10 degree Black
    Bars: Answer Pro taper Carbon OS 1" rise
    Grips: ODI Ruffian w/clamps
    Crank: Shimano XT M760 22-32-44t
    Front Derailer: shimano XT top swing dual pull
    Chain: Sram X-9 pc991 9s w/p-link
    Casette: Sram PG980 Csst 9s 11-34
    Rear Derailer: Sram X 9 long (I'm still not decided on this)
    Front tire: WTB Mutanoraptor Kevlar 2.4
    Rear tire: WTB Mutanoraptor Kevlar 2.24
    Rims: Mavic Crossride wheelset
    Seatpost: Maverick Seatpost ASP 31.6mm (Speedball)
    Saddle: Specialized BG2 Sport
    Peddels: Eggbeaters

  51. #51
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    Chapter 2, it only gets better!

    The second ride started much better having dialed in fit and air pressures pretty well on the first ride. I was able to get up to speed immediately with more confidence and gain a much better feel for the handling balance.

    This is the stand-out best bike I’ve ever ridden. It handles like a Turner (my favorite in rough trail handling balance) but is much lighter weight and pedals even smoother and with quicker response. Like a Turner, with mid-mounted rear shock, the weight distribution is very even between front to rear, with major weights in the fork, BB/crank, and rear hub. I don’t own a scale so I’ll have to ask the neighbors if I can use theirs and weight the bike and myself difference. This bike just feels so well balanced in every way.

    The stock shocks are really impressing me too. Fox has tuned the compression damping to combine with the naturally progressive air springs to act very linear, almost coil like in the top half of travel. The handling is so stable, and it swallows even moderate sized bumps and potholes and the beginner rider’s skidding stutter bumps like they almost weren’t there compared to my shorter travel but smooth Tracer action. It’s easier to go faster everywhere. And still no hint of the rear skipping nor easy lockup while braking in stutter bumps.

    Before the ride I wiped some fork oil on the Float RL sliders which noticeably helped free up the new seal stiction. The RP23 feels smoother on this ride too, just about as smooth on the small gravely small rock surfaces as my old non-platform coil Vanilla-R on the shorter travel Tracer.

    Climbing up the a short granny gear street climb to my house at the end of the ride the rear suspension nearly doesn’t bob at all, less than any other except a locked out or NRS that I’ve tired. But I tried flipping the pro-pedal lever on in the lightest of the 3 settings (firmest is near lockout, softest Propedal is very noticeably firm compression). With Propedal lever on, the rear suspension noticeably packed up, maybe not to top-out, but it did raise me on the seat at least Ĺ inch. Flip the lever to Propedal off, and the suspension settled back to normal climbing sag. This will make long smooth road climbs a little easier, positioning my weight more forward over the pedals. I’d never ride this bike off road with Propedal on unless is near pavement like smooth hardpack, the Propedal in the softest setting is pretty harsh feeling after riding without it.

    This bike can climb so easily whether rough or smooth. The suspension never stiffens up at all other than by changing the shock damper settings, it stays completely active and bump compliant like a low monopivot or Horst type, but without the bob. There’s no noticeable difference in bump compliance, whether pedaling, coasting, or braking. Pedaling in the granny, and any ring, has no kickback at all.

    Did I say this before? The most noticeable think about the Mojo is it’s so well balanced.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    The stock shocks are really impressing me too.
    Has this changed your plans to switch to a coil fork & shock? (I'm guessing that you'll still want to experiment...)
    Climbing up the a short granny gear street climb to my house at the end of the ride the rear suspension nearly doesnít bob at all, less than any other except a locked out or NRS that Iíve tired. But I tried flipping the pro-pedal lever on in the lightest of the 3 settings (firmest is near lockout, softest Propedal is very noticeably firm compression). With Propedal lever on, the rear suspension noticeably packed up, maybe not to top-out, but it did raise me on the seat at least Ĺ inch. Flip the lever to Propedal off, and the suspension settled back to normal climbing sag.
    Did you happen to look down at the shock when you were climbing the hill in light propedal? If so, was there any movement? My experience on my '04 Hollowpoint has been that any time you go above or below the bike's preferred sag point, you'll introduce bob when you pedal hard. Hit the preferred sag point dead on, and you're golden. Of course, the propedal damping may have been enough to counteract the bob...

    One other question: Do you know if your Mojo's RP23 has been tuned for a DW-link suspension? I purchased an aftermarket RP3 for my Hollowpoint and found the open (no-propedal) setting to be overdamped. PUSH was able to tune the damping to be more to my liking.

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinB
    Has this changed your plans to switch to a coil fork & shock? (I'm guessing that you'll still want to experiment...)

    Did you happen to look down at the shock when you were climbing the hill in light propedal? If so, was there any movement? My experience on my '04 Hollowpoint has been that any time you go above or below the bike's preferred sag point, you'll introduce bob when you pedal hard. Hit the preferred sag point dead on, and you're golden. Of course, the propedal damping may have been enough to counteract the bob...

    One other question: Do you know if your Mojo's RP23 has been tuned for a DW-link suspension? I purchased an aftermarket RP3 for my Hollowpoint and found the open (no-propedal) setting to be overdamped. PUSH was able to tune the damping to be more to my liking.
    Yup I need to find an earlier year non-propedal Vanilla-R or such for the rear before I can test coil on the Mojo.

    The RP23 needed some major rider oscillation to activate the suspension when in the soft propedal position. I haven't noticed a big difference in sag position and bob on the dw-Links I've demoed in the past. Perhaps there is a sweet-spot optimum sag, but that would be a little different for riders fitting the same bike but of different weights or having different pedal input and cadence style. I don't mind a little bob form pedaling, the dw-Linkers just have the least bob for such a buttery freely bump compliant ride. And they pedal up and through sharp hits smoother than any other I've ridden. And the later dw-Link designs brake as well as the best braking designs before it.

    I don't know if Ibis got Fox to special tune the Float RL fork (this Float R type fork is available OEM only with the "L" for lockout), or RP23. I doubt it on the RP23 from what a Fox race mechanic at Sea Otter described the difference was in the RP23 to the RP3. The RP23 is supposed to have faster damping when the propedal lever is OFF than the RP3 ever had, and when ON in the lightest propedal setting then about the same as the RP3 in the lower propedal setting. And I doubt if the forks are special tuned either unless for different frame sizes but I donít know (maybe more compression damping for the bigger riders of the larger sizes of the Float RL?).


  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    The RP23 is supposed to have faster damping when the propedal lever is OFF than the RP3 ever had, and when ON in the lightest propedal setting then about the same as the RP3 in the lower propedal setting.
    Ah, that's good. (And good to know.) That means that the RP23 (with propedal off) is a better match for DW-link than the stock RP3 was.

    With regard to that OEM Fox Float RL... it's a shame that they didn't swap the "L" for a "C". I have an '05 Vanilla RLC and really like the compression adjustment. I hardly ever touch the lockout adjustment though.

  55. #55
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    Talas or Float for Mojo

    Geofsandberg,
    Nice build for sure. Definitely post some pics when it arrives. In response to your fork question, I would say go for the TALAS. I went with the FLOAT for the weight savings (minimal) and positive early reviews of the fork. It is awesome. Very stiff, very smooth. BUT I can't help but want to dial it down when I'm climbing. I have a TALAS on my other ride and use it often. I guess I just got used to having the option and now I don't. My opinion is go for it......

  56. #56
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    mbexx: I am also used to adjustable travel for climbing with a long travel bike. I am wondering how the Float works with lockout for climbing. Have you tried using full lockout on your Fox Float for climbing? I understand it sags and remains a bit active and has adjustable blowoff for hits.

    How far does the fork sag under lockout? How does it feel when sagged and locked out? How well does the blowoff work to return it to full travel........ Thanks

  57. #57
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    noshortcuts, the lockout on the Float works very, very well. I have an 06 TALAS and the lockout does allow some movement, even with the blowoff threshold set high. The 07 FLOAT is different. Indiscernable movement, if at all. It truly is 'Locked Out'. Back out the threshold dial, however, and you have a 'pedaling platform' fork. (I tried this a few times and it works, basically no fork bob). This is great for climbing, b/c you keep that front end traction when the hill is rocky and technical. What's great is when you reach the top, flip off the lockout, the fork releases instantly, no lag at all.
    I do, however, miss the ability to alter the geometry of my bike on really steep climbs. (with the TALAS). 5.5 inches, locked out or not, is a tall front end when you're trying to tackle a really steep incline.

  58. #58
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    Thanks mbexx, Sounds good. I guess when Fox says the Float will "sag" (quoted below) when fully locked out, it is still not sagging enough to really shorten fork travel during a climb as I thought it might.

    From Fox online manual: "Rotate the lever fully clockwise to lockout the fork. This position is useful in climbing and sprinting situations, but will sag with the rider’s weight...."

    Also note that Fox says you can leave the fork locked out all the time once you get it tuned and it will just break free when needed: "A convenient tuning feature of the lockout force knob is that it allows you to leave your fork in the locked out position—no more fiddling with fork controls when the trail requires your undivided attention. Although you might need to adjust the knob a few times to find the sweet spot, once it is found you can simply leave your fork locked out. Your fork will then respond to hits in the trail (greater lockout force), for example, but will be locked out (lower lockout force) when you are out of your saddle on a climb."
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 08-15-2006 at 02:50 PM.

  59. #59
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    Chapter 3, Even faster!

    I've been so busy since I received the bike a week ago Tuesday I've only been able to ride 3 times. Last night after work was the third ride.

    Before riding I reset the brake calipers, which had been chirping a little while not in use on the previous two rides. This time I think I adjusted them to perfection using the business card spacer technique I'd heard about, because I'd been eyeballing the alignment previously (these are my first hydraulics).

    Maybe it was placebo or new bike euphoria, but maybe the brakes were really dragging significantly, however, the bike seemed to be even faster climbing on this ride.

    Even though tired at the end of a workday, it just seems much quicker and easier to get to speed and maintain a higher momentum than my Tracer. Reminds me of my Superlightís acceleration in certain gears except much more plush but no kickback nor the rear braking chatter. That Superlightís feedback and brake ďjackĒ or chatter lead me to get the Tracer after riding all the higher end bikes of 5 years ago, and since then not finding a better all around trail bike until the Mojo was speced using the dw-Link. But unlike the Superlight and even the great Tracer, the Mojo pedals smoothly and efficiently in every gear very equally.


    I'm liking the balance of the stock RP23 and Float RL of the SX build. They do work very well together. However they feel over damped on the compression side to me.

    After 6 years of using air suspension on my first full suspension bikes, Obed/FS(2), Superlight(3), Tracer(5), for the last four years I've been on old style non-platform Vanilla-R rear and coiled x-Fly 100 on the Tracer (last 6 months using an Uzzi-SL 4.5 inch travel link and Nixon Elite fork with firm spring kit set to 4.5 inch). I'm used to less stiction than air now, and under my 200 lbs plus gear I find I need to run the Float fork well under the recommended sag 50 - no more than 60psi to not be overly harsh even with low pressure 25psi in my front tire, and the RP23 at least 10 pounds under the Mojo manual recomendation of 90% body weight. While seated the RP23 rear isnít so noticeably less smooth than the coil on my Tracer, but standing brings out the choppyier ride quality of the air and slow compression damping of the RP23.

    I still want to find an old Vanilla-R without propedal and use my Nixon sprung for me on the Mojo. I think the real pedaling characteristics will be more apparent rather than hidden under the slower compression damping of the OEM shock and fork. And the rear braking although excellent compared to best other suspension designs will be even better with even less stiction and less compression resistance for even better traction.

    Iím thinking dialing in with steel coils for optimum balance then getting a ti coil for the rear to reduce the weight would be ultimate.

    If anyone has an old, before Propedal, 2003 or earlier Vanilla-R or RC rear shock, 7 7/8 x 2 (i2i x stroke), let me know Iíll buy it from you. I can get coil springs from Fox.


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    Ibis down under...

    as the Australian distributor for Ibis... (does that mean anything if you're yet to actually SEE any?)

    I'm hoping to see at least one frame next month... If so... I might build it up as a magazine test bike (then it might end up as my ride... what a shame...)

    Here's my build...

    Ibis Mojo Carbon (medium)
    Fox RP23
    Fox 32 Talas RLC (or Talas X... I can't decide)
    Syncros internal headset
    Syncros FLStem (damn, but it is light and rigid... not to mention it also looks great)
    Salsa Pro Moto Carbon riserbar (I love the bend of these bars)
    Ritchey WCS alloy seatpost (it's light and I don't trust carbon posts at my weight)
    SDG Bel Air Ti rail saddle (old faithfull)
    Oury Lock On grips
    Hayes El Camino brakes
    Crank Brothers Cobalt cranks (arriving in two weeks)
    Crank Brothers Cobalt Ti bottom bracket (see above)
    Crank Brothers ACID2 pedals (see above)
    Shimano 2007 XTR shifting (if I have to wait... so be it)
    DT Swiss EX5.1D rims (light and strong)
    DT Swiss 240s 6-bolt hubset (light, strong and reliable)
    DT Swiss Supercomp spokes
    DT Swiss ProLock Alloy nipples
    Syncros Point n Chute Factory 2.35" tyres (made by Kenda... great compounds and tread design)
    Stan's (who needs tubes)
    ok... granted it's mainly a mix of the brands that we distribute locally... But it's still a damn nice build!

    Elvis.
    (who also has an El-Mariachi Limited Edition coming in the next two weeks...)
    www.dirtworks.com.au
    Last edited by Elvis @ Dirt Works; 08-17-2006 at 03:18 PM.

  61. #61
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    Welcome to Australia, the Arse-End of the World.
    No longer member of the bike industry nor society, so don't hassle me.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thylacine
    Welcome to Australia, the Arse-End of the World.
    oh I don't know.... I could name some far worse places to be...

    Elvis.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elvis @ Dirt Works
    I'm hoping to see at least one frame next month... If so... I might build it up as a magazine test bike (then it might end up as my ride... what a shame...)
    That would be a shame, that would mean it would never get ridden

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    This thread really needs pics or chick pics

    at $4700, just need a drivetrain.


















  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by 0700
    at $4700, just need a drivetrain.
    WELL..... What are you waiting for !!!???!!!

    I wouldn't even be able to wait long enough to take pictures and post them and I'd be putting a drivetrain on that baby.

    Seriously, it's beautiful... Thanks for the pics.

  66. #66
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    Having a hard time deciding on cranks....would really like the cobalt.....we'll see if they ship......and actiontec ti rings.....been busy completing a few monster trucks....





    and there is the Szazbo to update with all new bits....









    I need to scan all my old Bowti pics....

  67. #67
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    Found a few vintage BowTi pics....I'm really confident the mojo wil blow it away, my 4banger did, and the mojo brings the best of both to the table.










  68. #68
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    Steep rocky climbing and downhill

    I took a longer ride on the Mojo today. I rode to the top of Pine Mountain near Mt. Tam, didnít do the whole loop, I was mostly interested in riding some of the steeper and rocky climbs and downhills and rougher extended rock gardens and doing a knarly downhill singletrack that Iíd never ridden before, off the San Geronimo ridge which later traversed and climbed to near the top of Pine Mountain.

    The Mojo is the easiest steep climber Iíve ridden by far. Even with the 5.5 inch fork the steep seat position and low BB make it easy to climb without excessive elbow bending or tugging on the bars. It almost jumps effortlessly up the steeps just leaning forward and spinning over about any line in the rocks.

    The bike is also the easiest Iíve ever ridden pedaling up long rock gardens of irregular sized rocks, gravel, and baby-heads. The Mojo has the great traction of my Tracer and no pedal kickback and the acceleration of a hardtail but with liquid feeling sharp bump absorption. The suspension just doesnít stiffen up to resist bump hits in any way.

    No other bike, not VPP, Horst link, ICT, FSR or any other buzzed up hyper design comes close to the climbing pedaling and ride quality and efficient power transfer of this dw-Link bike. I can stand and pedal or stay seated without noticeable squat, bob, pedal jack, nor kickback or stiffness.

    Higher speed handling in looser dirt is very balanced with the both wheels maintaining corner direction changes without sudden washout or hooking. The bike rails corners on loose dirt over hardpack. Very tight uphill and downhill switchbacks are easy. The Mojo is superb in handling balance from slow crawls to teary-eyed high speeds.

    Downhill is a little dicey in the rocks, a small part due to the bikeís very light weight. But mostly due to the slow compression damping hiding the stiction of the air sprung Float RL fork and RP23, causing my rather low pressured tubeless Mutanoraptor 2.4 tires (about 23/27 psi f/r) to bounce the bike. Sticky knobby tires would settle the bike better over rocks, and ride a little smoother on rocks, because soft slow durometer rubber compresses quickly but rebounds slowly. But climbing ease would probably suffer a lot from much worse rolling resistance. Iíll try the OEM sticky knobby Kenda Nevegals tomorrow, maybe the rolling resistance isnít so different. Iíve been comparing my Mojo ride with the same wheels and tires off my Tracer to gain a direct comparison in ride quality.

    I tried a few lower air pressures settings front and rear to try to gain better small bump absorption. But there was no real difference in quality and I was catching pedals while climbing in rougher areas every hundred yards or so if I wasnít very mindfull of the low clearance. I tried higher pressures than I had set the previous ride but the added preload made it more choppy handling and harsher over rocks and usable deep travel was reduced even more. And at higher pressures, with about 20% sag or maybe a little less, introduced a slight hint of pedal kickback and a little pedal bob. I ended up finding the optimized balance to be again where I had it set from the previous ride with about 25 to maybe 27% sag where usable travel and smoothness was maximized, had minimal pedal bob, standing and bouncing on the pedals compressed the front and rear evenly, and I was rarely hitting my pedals.

    My air pressure settings for my 200 lbs, plus gear, are 50 psi in the fork and 170 psi in the shock, 30 psi under what Fox recommends for the fork for my weight, and 10 psi under what Ibis recommended (The Ibis manual recommends 90% body weight as a starting point) in the RP23 for my weight. Fox has always way over estimated coil spring weight and air pressure for me, the Ibis ownerís manual was very close to the optimization for the RP23 for the Mojo, but referred to the Fox owners manual for the fork pressure.

    I think Iíll be demoing a DHX Air soon on the bike but I donít expect much improvement in reducing the slow compression requirement of any air shock to hide its stiction and to make it work somewhat more linear. Iíve always found that Fox makes the smoothest stock air shocks and forks available, but air is such a compromise in ride quality compared with a coil shock or fork without platform. My 4 inch stock travel Tracer with coil fork and shock absorbs up to 1 inch rocks at any speed much smoother than this air fork and shock with 5.5 inch travel. I hope the DHX Air is significantly better and as silky as coil over rocks, it would be about a pound lighter than a steel coil shock. I see no hope for the major improvement that the Float R fork needs to be as smooth as an optimized coil fork. I'm investigating if PUSH or someone can tune the Fox air to match the best coil can be, but Iím nearly certain that coil suspension will be the icing on the cake for the dw-Link Mojo Carbon.

    No hype, the Mojo is the standout best trail bike in the world.


  69. #69
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    Quick Thanks for the time to post such detailed and usefull feedback

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    Good writeup, Derby. How's the underside of the downtube looking? Sounds like you've put the bike through all sorts of terrain.

  71. #71
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    Might be a good spot for a strip of clearbra?

    Tall Tom, what do your protos look like down there after a year?

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by alchemist
    That would be a shame, that would mean it would never get ridden
    HA!

    I've beed riding every weekend for the past 2 months. last weekend I was out on the Moment on both days!

    So there!

    Elvis.

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by 0700
    Might be a good spot for a strip of clearbra?

    Tall Tom, what do your protos look like down there after a year?
    So far no chips under the down tube. But you've reminded me. I forgot I wanted to lay some black tape under the lower area of down tube until I can find some clear tape like the 4 spots of clear tape supplied with the bike. Car parts stores may have some clear paint guard material.

    I did get a couple small non-visible clear-coat chips from the chain before I covered the stays well enough. I've zip tied some inner tube around the lower stay and used sticky back velcro (the harder hooked side) around the wheel side of the drop-out area and up the chain-stay where the chain could slap. And some sticky-back velcro under the chain sty near the rings. And tied a little strip of inner tube around the lower rear crossover of the front deraillier. Now the bike is very quiet except the chain slapping the big ring when in the middle and the sides of the front deraillier.

    The bike seems to amplify the jingle of the ring slap and the rear pad rub noise while using the brakes a little. Not very loud, just a little louder than a metal frame bike. Maybe it's really not louder at all and I'm just over acutely aware of any noises since its all new.

    Sorry, still have not got my camera back. Nikon said 7 day turnaround for my Coolpix 4.6 warrantee service. It's 15 business days so far.

    - ray

  74. #74
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    (I cut this out and pasted further up the thread)
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 08-21-2006 at 10:01 PM.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by 0700
    Might be a good spot for a strip of clearbra?

    Tall Tom, what do your protos look like down there after a year?
    Hi Mojos:
    This clear tape looks good for these protective purposes: http://www.findtape.com/shop/product.aspx?id=173&bc=F
    Outdoor grade, clear, no yellowing, and protective.
    I was thinking the 2" inch version might work well for the down tube and the chain stay.
    With 30 feet of it, there is probably someone out there who will wrap their whole bike!
    Happy riding!

  76. #76
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    What do the protos look like?

    Quote Originally Posted by 0700
    Might be a good spot for a strip of clearbra?

    Tall Tom, what do your protos look like down there after a year?
    Fortunately, or unfortunately the prototype bikes are currently out earning their keep. So I cannot offer you photographic evidence of their condition. In my opinion they are holding up surprisingly well.

    The frames that Scot and Hans have been riding probably have the most mileage on them and both have gone almost their entire existance without the stainless chain suck plate or the clear plastic chainstay protector. Both have some chips in the clear coat (Hans's happens to be a matte finish), but nothing particularly ugly or threatening. I rode a frame that we had painted locally that was not only punished by my lack of riding skills and negligent maintaince routine, but also by the fact that it has become our most used demo workhorse. The orange paintjob on this frame shows scratches more prominently than the clear coated frames, but even still I think that the frame looks pretty swell - all things considered. Interestingly I haven't noticed significant damage on any of the frames along the underside of the down tube as most people seem to fear. Most of the wear appears on the drive side chain stay and the side of the down tube from laying the bike down.

    It is important to note that the wall thicknesses of the carbon lay up in these high wear areas are substantial - between 1/8 and 3/16". While I wouldn't recommend taking a Dremel tool to them, they can sustain a good amount of normal wear and tear without compromising the frame.

    In regard to protective films, we have used a 3M product called "Leading Edge Tape". This stuff is used to protect airplane wings, so I'm pretty confident that it's up to the task of protecting a mountain bike. It's available from aircraft supply companies such as Aircraft Spruce: http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalo...ngedgetape.php
    in 100 ft rolls. It's kind of expensive, but 1 roll will probably last you a lifetime.

    Finally, Derby mentioned experiencing abnormal chain slap and other frame noise versus his experience with metal frames. While I can't say for sure what's going on with his frame, I would say that his experience is directly the opposite of what has been the typical experience. Most folks who have ridden the Mojo comment on it being almost disturbingly quiet.

    Thanks for all the support from everyone. Hearing all the positive reviews from the first Mojo owners has made doing this whole thing worthwhile.

  77. #77
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    Weight and noise

    Quote Originally Posted by Tall Tom

    Finally, Derby mentioned experiencing abnormal chain slap and other frame noise versus his experience with metal frames. While I can't say for sure what's going on with his frame, I would say that his experience is directly the opposite of what has been the typical experience. Most folks who have ridden the Mojo comment on it being almost disturbingly quiet.

    Thanks for all the support from everyone. Hearing all the positive reviews from the first Mojo owners has made doing this whole thing worthwhile.
    Tom is absolutely right. In stock delivery the Mojo chain slapped much less when I rode it first without any stay protection compared to other bikes in stock ďnaked ď delivery. The chain clearance is maximized and the angle of contact is not direct when the chain does slap un-padded stays. The Mojo's chain slap noise is different, kind of a wooden knock rather than clanking. Nothing at all like the full blast banging loud "Fender Stratocaster" Carbon Fiber Trek Y-22 that could almost be heard coming from the other side of the mountain! I think was being over sensitive again and just have been listening over acutely to the new sounds trying to isolate every last contact point to pad if possible. Iíll get over the silencing effort soon! I've pretty much eliminated all chain slap now and it is nearly silent most of the time and just jingles a little bouncing through rocks. The Hayes brakes are quite a bit louder in friction hissing compared to my old Avid mechanicals, maybe is mostly just a difference in pads.

    I stopped by Sunshine Bike Shop following a Tamarancho loop after work today to show off my bike. And to ask about the brake noise Ė itís normal, Hayes are just somewhat loud hissing with their stock metallic type pads, but no squealing normally except a few times there was a high vibration honking for a few seconds the other day near the bottom of some long steep downhills and cooked them good. For me, maybe because of my higher weight, brake noise comes and gos, these Hayes seem to be rathe stable in accetably low noise with those rare exceptions about 3 times just after extreme hot use. But they got quiet quickly when they cooled down some. Iím getting a 7 inch rotor for the front which should help avoid overloading the brakes with my 200 lbs weight.)

    Sunshine Bikes had just built up a Carbon Ibis road bike the week before to 16 pounds! And they weighed my bike on their yellow digital bike scale (the scale looked pretty impressive for accuracy - down to 100th of a pound). Mine is now 28.6 lbs, dirty. I estimate it was 27.5 lbs delivered - without pedals - which is how bikes are weighed in bike magazine tests.

    Iíve added over a pound of weight since the SX build Mojo was delivered to me. I added my 2/3 rd of a pound Time Attack pedals (it is faster using pedals!). Also added my Ergon Grips which are about ľ pound heavier than the OEM but so comfortable! And I did swap to my heavy duty Hope Bulb hubbed Mavic x3.1 wheels with Stanís tubeless MutanoRaptor 2.4ís, but they really felt the same weight as the OEM CrossRides and Nevegals. I put on my WTB Lazer-V ti seat and Thompson post off my Tracer (didnít change the seat angle at all!) and the WTB seat is probably slightly heavier than the very light OEM Fisik ti seat and Ibis post, but Iím used to the WTBís larger size. The OEM Fisik seat is very comfortable too, Iíll try it again, itís a great seat design.

    While holding the bike up in front of me and weighting the BB away from me with my foot looking for flex (a common test for bike frame flex), it really appears this bike has unusually low flex for any bike, with suspension or not, more like the low flex of a very heavy duty Freeride slam bike weighing over 10 pounds more. This bike handles with a snap coming out of hardpack corners. Iíve never ridden anything that even closely maintains momentum as easily over anything, up, down, and cornering. I really need to ride much longer than before to get tired.

    I thought about what it would take to get me to give up this bike right now. I wouldnít sell it for $5000 now even though Iíd make over $1500 profit. (But I will take $10,000 right now, but maybe not tomorrow!) It really is that good. Fact: The Ibis Mojo Carbon is the standout best trail bike in the world.


  78. #78
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    Easy goes it!!

    Derby,
    I get the point, this is a gotta have bike. You do realize that the Ibis guys are watching this board? Every time you put up a post, the price of the bike goes up, or at least the temptation to goes up. Which doesn't hurt you, but for the rest of us........Well, you see where I'm goin'.

    For Tall Tom and the rest of the Ibis folks. Pluuuuuuleeeeeeze don't jack the price up,,,,,yet. I know it must be tempting, but be good to the ones of us that couldn't/didn't get on the "list" soon enough. This bike is within my reach ..........for now.

    Derby, I'm kiddin' you of course. I was dying to see some feedback from someone who wasn't on the payroll, know what I mean? Thanks..........I think.

    Oldn0tded

  79. #79
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    Hi
    I just receve my mojo
    and I test it today
    one off the best bike I ever test in my life
    with my ellsworth epiphany



    11,6kg with out pedales

  80. #80
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    11.6 kilograms is equal to 25.57 lbs

    Very nice! I can't wait until I have one as well!

  81. #81
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    Ordered mine. Now I just have to wait.

  82. #82
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    Z, good meeting you and seeing the first other Mojo on the trail up on Tamarancho Thursday eve.

    Mine weighs 28.6 with the SX build OEM RP23 and Float-RL on a digital scale with Time pedals and lighter Thompson post than your quick drop post, but heavier Hope Bulb Mavic UST rims, otherwise similar build. 29 lbs sounds about right for yours with the platform pedals and bash guards. I guess my coiled Tracer was a lot heavier than I thought, because the Mojo feels about 3 pounds lighter when picking it up.

    Fox customer service had a new '02 Vanilla-R shock (before propedal) I just ordered, and I'll be swapping my Nixon Elite coil to it, so the weight will tip to about 31 pounds. I'm still demoing that DHX Air and will review it later on my thread here after one more ride this weekend. Thursday's loop was the first ride on it and I like it better in smoothness than the RP23 set at the softest adjustments possible with rideable sag. Before committing to buying the DHX, I want to ride the coil set up (my plan from the beginning).

    The Mojo rides with such a noticeable better combination of momentum and acceleration and handling balance than any other bike I've tried, that it feels much lighter and more nimble than others of similar weight.

    Oh, I got my camera back but it fried again and wouldn't start after the initial set-up. At least Nikon sent me a prepaid shipping label for a second try. Hope it doesn't take another 4 weeks. That camera, a Coolpix 4.6 is now only $125 mail order (bought another for my low-tech but master fabricator/mechanic brother at that price last spring), I've been spending way too much money lately, but I'm thinking of getting one as a back up. But I would like a bigger and brighter viewer screen for my next camera.

    - ray
    Last edited by derby; 08-26-2006 at 10:45 AM.

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    Fox customer service had a new '02 Vanilla-R shock (before propedal) I just ordered ...
    Interesting. It hadn't occurred to me that Fox might have a supply of older shocks sitting around. (Makes sense though.)

    How did you figure out which spring to get? Or did you order several likely springs with the intention of swapping as necessary?

  84. #84
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    Any one know when the XLs will be avaliable?

  85. #85
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    DHX Air vs. RP23

    I've done two rides with the DHX-Air 5.0 on the Mojo. I'm looking for no-platform (no auto-lockout) and light compression damping, with medium rebound damping to suppress excess wallow and bucking, for the smoothest and most stable and efficient ride all the time.

    The DHX-Air is able to reduce compression resistance and increase smoothness noticeably better than the RP23 that my Mojo with factory SX build kit came with. The SX build with RP23 is very well speced, really economical, and only about one pound heavier than the XTR/Easton SL build option for $1200 extra. The DHX Ai is an optional additional cost for either build.

    The DHX Air is nearly as smooth as an optimized coil shock without platform. The 2+ pounds extra for using coil front and rear becomes a tradeoff of noticeable smoother small to medium bump improvement with a fast (soft) compression damped coil vs. the lighter weight advantage of for slightly faster climbing. Lighter weight for climbing is everything for sprint XC racing advantage where only a foot or two lead in key points in a race means the difference of winning and loosing, or carrying your bike for miles during X-Terrra type racing (do they still do that?).

    If you are looking for full time solid pedaling platform on an slower accelerating bike like a low monopivot or ICT and similar “faux-bar” type single pivot multilink, the DHX Air can dial it in from none with very good smoothness, to very firm near hardtail effects, and still have a bit smoother bigger hit performance than the RP23 set with the same platform firmness.

    But the RP23 is very nice too. There is little noticeable difference if you want platform (auto-lockout) effects to have the firmest pedaling while standing ride. And the on-off Propedal lever is usable on the fly to use 3 levels of very light to near lockout Propedal for most pedaling situation, then flipping the lever off for a smoother downhill. The DHX Air has no on-the-fly on-off lever.

    The RP23 is a better racing shock, lighter by a quarter pound, and having the on-off propedal platform lever which can be hooked up to a remote handle bar lever.

    The DHX Air is more "all mountain" exploration oriented.

    Optimizing the DHX Air:

    I’m used to a Tracer with 1/2 to 1 inch more BB depending on tire height and linkage options height than the Mojo’s 13.0 with 2.1 OEM Kenda Nevegals. I’m using 2.4 tall Mutanoraptor tires and the same wheels I used on the Tracer for a direct comparison. The 2.4 tires helps clearance a little, but not much due to the low tire pressure I’m used to, about 25/29 psi tire pressures front/rear, maybe less.

    I spent much time on my second DHX ride optimizing it for my requirements, trying to keep the sag to a minimum to maximize the lower pedal clearance than I’m used to, without loosing small to medium hit smoothness and maintaining full travel. (1.75 of the full stroke, leaving the last .25 inch of the 2 inch shock stroke for 6+ foot wheelie drops to flat (which I never do, I only do familiar tranny-drops up to 4 foot vertical, if that, but this bike may see more vertical tranny-drop air someday I can easily imagine).

    I started with my first ride DHX Air settings, minimum platform setting (0 clicks in of 22 dial), minimum compression at 75 psi adjusted with the air pressured “Boost-Valve” (I’d like to see that architecture), and bottom-out (air volume?) adjusted all the way out (perhaps very light riders with very low main chamber air pressures could adjust this bottom-out in some for some ramp-up bottom clunk resistance safety. And on the rebound, maximum “firmness”, and less and the bike would pogo more than one cycle (more than 3 or 4 clicks from full firm had no noticeable effect, The minimal usable adjustment of the rebound range of the DHX is either poor design or possibly defective on this used demo shock.

    No matter what I’ve tried I can’t get into the last ĺ inch of the Mojo’s 5.5 inch suspension travel even softened up with sag so deep I clip pedals every hundred yards, so for a bigger 200 lb. rider like me with the best air suspension available the Mojo is effectively a 5 inch travel bike. But in comparision to most other air suspended bikes the Mojo is superior. Most other bikes have much more rising rate suspension and less travel is usable with air springs than the Mojo. Light to more average weight riders can probably utalize that last Ĺ inch deep travel using a DHX or RP23 air shock without bottoming.

    For my 200 lbs, I needed 210 Psi vs. 170 with the RP23 for the same sag to minimize pedal clipping without being raise more in pressure to be a firm ride. The DHX felt smoother with the same sag than the RP23. The RP23 has non-adjustable compression damping set about as firm as the DHX with medium compression adjustment set, and I had the DHX set with minimum (softest) compression damping adjustment at to start the basic shock tuning optimization process.

    So I tried slowing compression damping and reducing the main air spring pressure. I tried air pressure down 20 psi to 190 with compression to the medium rate (125 psi boost pressure). The compression damping counteracted the rebound damping and packed up the travel from the static sag setting to raise the suspension and keep the pedals for clipping the trail excessively compared to minimum compression damping with the same main air spring pressure.

    But the small and especially medium bump hits were firmer and more choppy with medium compression damping, not really bad but not in the direction I wanted for best momentum in bumps, both pedaling and downhill.

    So I raised main air pressure 10 psi to 200, and reduced the boost valve compression adjuster from 125 to 100. This proved to be the optimum for me with the DHX Air.

    I tried the Propedal with slightly lower than optimum air pressure and soft compression damping, and like the compression damping increase, Propedal raised (packed up) the dynamic sag while pedaling slightly, but at a greater cost to small bump compliance than using just main compression damping. Main Compression increase (boost valve pressure increase) firmed middle sized bump compliance with out firming small bump sensitivity like Propedal does. The dw-Link is not benifited at all by Propedal increase except for standing pedaling for race effort type riding. This is where the RP23 flip-on preset-Propedal lever is a bettter match for racing than the DHX turn knob.

    Any higher main air spring pressures with this 100 psi boost valve mild compression damping or more firm compression damping would reduce deep travel significantly (by greater than an inch less travel). Lower pressure in the main air spring would be smoother but bottom travel was not really deeper and my pedals would clip the trail frequently during mid travel use common during pedaling.

    In a week or so should receive a new 2002 Vanilla-R (before there was Propedal) with a couple coil springs to try, which I bought yesterday from Fox customer service (thanks Nick for digging that out of the dusty warehouse inventory.) Earlier in the week Jason also at Fox customer service, researched and informed me that the OEM Float-RL can be converted to coil with preload-adjuster knob assembly, compression rod assembly, and coil spring for $105 in parts (plus fork oil for $22) direct before shipping and tax.

    My plan is that I’ll first optimize the Vanilla-R using a Manitou Nixon Elite 115 to 145 travel with Nixon firm spring kit. If the Vanilla-R shock performs better than the DHX Air in small to medium bump compliance and gains the missing Ĺ inch of bottom travel using air (as I expect from previous experience), I may convert the OEM Float-RL to coil to shave Ĺ pound compared to the Nixon, and look for a ti shock spring to shave weigh down to near DHX Air weight, for an end result only about Ĺ pound heavier than air shock and fork.

    In conclusion, The DHX Air is a noticeable improvement for smoother and more widely adjustable mountain trial riding compared to the RP23. But the RP23 is lighter by a quarter pound and the moderate compression damping with flip-off platform (potentially remote mounted on the handle bar) would be a better race shock and is a very good air shock for average weigh and light riders.

    The Mojo Carbon review with coil performance will follow in a week or two.

    Last edited by derby; 08-27-2006 at 07:07 PM.

  86. #86
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    Just placed a downpayment for my IBIS Mojo !

    Anyone else in Canada order (or better yet receive) their frame yet ? I suppose I'd be lucky to see this frame by the end of the year...

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by konaken
    Just placed a downpayment for my IBIS Mojo !

    Anyone else in Canada order (or better yet receive) their frame yet ? I suppose I'd be lucky to see this frame by the end of the year...
    I put my deposit for a Medium in December... still waiting (toronto area).

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by MJ51
    I put my deposit for a Medium in December... still waiting (toronto area).
    Wow ! I guess I shouldn't be complaining that my bike store didn't have them in stock.

    I take it you ordered yours via Duke Cycle ?

  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by konaken
    Wow ! I guess I shouldn't be complaining that my bike store didn't have them in stock.

    I take it you ordered yours via Duke Cycle ?
    I'm pretty sure that "in stock" Mojos do not exist yet. They are all sold before they hit the showroom. Yes I ordered from Duke's, great guys and have been excellent keeping me up to date on the status. Sadly there are simply not enough Mojos to fill the huge demand yet. I've got my fingers crossed for the Sept delivery...

  90. #90
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    October(?)

    Quote Originally Posted by MJ51
    I'm pretty sure that "in stock" Mojos do not exist yet. They are all sold before they hit the showroom. Yes I ordered from Duke's, great guys and have been excellent keeping me up to date on the status. Sadly there are simply not enough Mojos to fill the huge demand yet. I've got my fingers crossed for the Sept delivery...
    My dealer Over the Edge, Fruita, CO says they are told by Ibis the production should be up to full capacity and orders filled by October.

    It was well worth the 3 month wait for mine after ordering.


  91. #91
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    My dealer called them yesterday to order a XL . Waiting for a call back. I wonder if Ibis is at eurobike?
    Last edited by sikocycles; 08-30-2006 at 04:51 PM.

  92. #92
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    Good to hear!

  93. #93
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    BOSS, congrads and thanks for the pic, keep them coming!

    I'm not well.............the other day I thought...."If I order the small for my wife, it's will be here in time for next season........." Then we'd have two!!!!

  94. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acadian
    Here are some pics I took at Sea Otter this year - drool worthy stuff for those of you waiting for your frames (even for those of you who aren't)
    Holy chit! I'm pretty well sold on the 29er thing and am mos def not in the market for a 26er frame, but this bike is absolutely stunning. I'm surprised there hasn't been more press on them since the frames have hit the pipeline.
    "I'll disintegrate over time if I expect my body to try to keep up with my mind" -BM

    Race, Rocks or Road...Just Ride

  95. #95
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    Coiled Mojo

    After 3 weeks I finally got to test my own Ibis Mojo Carbon and it’s genuine state-of-the-art dw-Link suspension with coil springs. I’ve actually waited almost 4 years since my first very impressive ride on a dw-Link designed Iron Horse Hollowpoint and later the MKiii, and Independant Fabrications and of course the Mojo versions of the dw-Link all with air shocks, to really feel the true nature of the design with coil. And the wait was worth it!

    Not that the Mojo rides poorly with air at all, it’s the best riding air suspended bike in the world. And many riders prefer the mid travel plushness of air springs, especially lighter weight riders. Air shocks can now be tuned to emulate the quality of coil in many ways using a small amount of low speed and moderate amount of higher speed compression damping to slow the nature of air to blow through mid travel and otherwise require firm rebound to avoid an unstable and bouncy ride.

    Fox found a new 2002 Vanilla-R in their inventory, which I bought. I mounted my barely used Nixon Elite with firm spring for my weight. And tried a few springs on the Vanilla-R until I found one that optimized in balance evenly in static sag and deeper travel compression with the rate of the fork when bouncing the bike while standing on the pedals. For my 200 pounds plus ride gear, I found a 600 lb coil allowed me to use 2 turns preload for 25% sag and a steeper climbing and tight trail handling ride and best pedaling clearance, or no preload for about 30% sag and a slinkier lower and slightly softer handling ride. I my eventually ether convert my OEM Float-RL fork to Vanilla-R (for $105 in left side parts. Or sell it and get a Vanilla RLC fork for more fine-tuning options. Honestly, even with coil the new Nixon has more stiction than the new OEM Float-RL, although the linear travel handling of the Nixon and full 5+ inches of usable travel is far superior to the ’07 Float’s rapid dive and usable travel limit of 4.5 inches. If the Nixon doesn’t break in to eliminate stiction, a Vanilla type fork will replace it.

    My bike now weighs 30.3 lbs on the same digital scale it weighed 28.5 with the OEM Float RL and RP23. The Nixon added 1 lb. over the 4 lb. OEM Float RL and the Vanilla-R coil added .8 lb. over the RP23. A titanium rear spring could reduce the rear coil gain by almost a half pound to about .4 lb. over the RP23 weight, and a Vanilla fork is .5 lb. lighter than the Nixon, so the potential is .9 lb weight cost of coil going full bling.

    Before my first ride on the coil set up I planned to mount up the air fork and DHX Air again for a ride afterwards to see if the extra 1.8 lbs. more weight for the coil set up was worth it.

    The bumpy typically poor condition Marin back street climb up to the trail head wasn’t that impressive for being much smoother than the DHX Air, but noticeably smoother than the RP23. Climbing up to Tamarancho on the washed out pot holed Alchemy Trail didn’t impress me as much smoother either, but it was buttery smooth and there was a lot better pedal clearance, I could never find a way to use enough air for less than 30% sag to gain pedal clearance with the OEM air fork and shock without suffering a rather firm and choppy ride.

    Once up and turning left for the easier way around on the loop trail and speed increased the extra smoothness and more stable handling really stood out. Reaching the Serpentine Trail open meadow downhill section near center camp brought some faster speed, a 3-foot air drop to flat and, a set of very choppy deep potholes. The bike felt like it was glued to the trail, the rutted drop landing was never so smooth, even the potholes had some rhythm at the higher speed I was able to confidently carry. Later in the trail all the sharper rocky sections were made into roller coaster rhythm sections rather than the dicey and choppy handling of the air sprung ride. The bike did feel a little heavier when climbing, but I was also rather tired when I started, and I climbed as fast as I had with air.

    I decided after this one ride that there was no reason to try the air sprung set up again.

    Pedal bob? With the softly damped coil suspension and while seated and pedaling on flat or while climbing on pavement the dw-Link moved or bobbed about 1/8 inch shock travel translating to about 1/4 to 1/2 inch of suspension travel bob. With air optimized with no propedal compression the bob was less to almost none. But no other suspension in existence with 5.5 inches travel set with the softest damping and no platform bob’s nearly as little as the dw-Link, including VPP. An ICT design bike or a same pedaling effect low-monopivot with only 4 inch travel bob’s over 1 inch in the same seated pedaling conditions without using firmly set platform and damping. Yet the dw-Link complies to bumps as smoothly as a low monopivot set up with the same soft damped shock, and pedals even smoother with even greater compliance in bumps.

    The coil ride is noticeably smoother and more linear. Coil eliminates the dicey and skipping feel of air suspension when descending fast in rock gardens, the ride through irregular rocks turns into a flowing watery like ride, bringing much confidence to lean into line adjustments and brake hard at the last moment. Coil ramps ups in compression resistance a little earlier in mid travel, leaving the more plush last third of deep travel used on moderate to bigger hits and g-outs. There is far less fork dive with the linear coil compression when braking lightly to moderately for handling tight line changes. Much less compression damping is required for stability, and there is less seal stiction, together resulting in velvety smooth surface feel over any terrain. The best air suspension cannot match the handling quality and smoothness of coil.

    Update: Just priced a RCS titatium coil at $250 retail and they aren't made for the Vanilla-R. A larger DHX fit would have to be adapted with plate spacers or larger custom plates (adding weight). So not worth the 1/3 pound savings!

    Last edited by derby; 09-07-2006 at 01:10 PM.

  96. #96
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    Fork: Fox Talas OR Pace RC41,
    Well, I pulled the trigger and ordered the Pace RC41 Fighter with 20mm thru axle. 150mm travel at about 4 - 4.1lbs including steer tube and axle .

    This was my hardest decision on this build.

    Negatives include: 1. Pace is newly distributed in the USA and has had hit and miss quality control in the past. 2. It is hard to find direct comparisons with other forks and I could not find one to test ride. 3. The fork does not offer travel adjustments. 4. The fork is too expensive.

    Positives include: 1. Carbon lowers and arches and will look great with the Mojo. 2. It is one of the lightest (yet strong) long travel forks available. 3. The fork offers several external adjustments including lockdown for climbing that leaves 50+mm of active travel.

    Several things helped me dig out the credit card: 1. Pace quickly answered all my emails with thoughtful direct answers to direct questions. 2. Garageworks in Irvine, CA confirmed that they will become an authorized dealer and service center for Pace before the end of this year. At this point, only QBP is. 3. I needed to decide on a fork so I could order the appropriate wheelset (QR or thru-axle). 4. I can't be caught empty handed when the frame finally arrives. 5. Universal Cycles giving 15% off of orders over $300 (along with no tax and cheap shipping) helped put a dent in this expense.

  97. #97
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    Hope you get lucky with Pace, I'll never touch them again...

  98. #98
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    I
    Ibis propose a new complet mojo bike
    the SLX
    full 2007 xtr for 5400$


    I love my mojo, it's one off the best bike i ever test
    after 2 weeks i dont find anny default on that frame
    the RP23 and the float rlc fork works to good
    in full XTR that will be a amazing bike

  99. #99
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    more photos off my mojo
    with salsa carbon handlebar and salsa-hope wheel






  100. #100
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    Has anyone heard from Ibis in the last 2-3 weeks? I sent Scot an email for an update on the next batch, but haven't had a response. I also noticed that they haven't answered any comments here or on chuckibis.com. They are usually very quick to respond.

    Where are the Ibisians?

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