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  1. #1
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    Fox F140 (32 mm) vs Float RC2 (36 mm) - adding a pound of fork..

    ---I hates to admit being a weight-weanie.... but after 6 months on a 32 mm Fox Float 140 RLC (which I quite like) I'm thinking of putting a Float RC2 (36 mm) onto Mojo (with same travel) which would increase the fork weight by 1 lb -- the benefit would be that the many technical babyheads and roots riding out here (SW NH) would be even more stable at speed, I think.
    So I was wondering if anyone has experience with adding/subracting a pound of fork on Mojo -- during climbing, especially those many times I'm lifting the front wheel up over rocks in the trail, if these situations would be noticeably more difficult and slow with the extra 1 lb on the front end? thanks

  2. #2
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    To help with climbing...

    I would suggest the Talas RC2 over the Float RC2. I know that its more money and a tad more weight than the Float, but you would not have to worry about the climbing of the mojo or the overall height of the fork, as you can level out the geometrey for the bike at 130, It has settings at 160, 130, and 100. If stiffness and plushness is what you seek, look no further. Or there is the Pike!!! The Float 36 will be stiffer and have 20mm more travel above the 32 version. Not worth the bang for the buck unless you do a lot of downhill. Talas man.

  3. #3
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    According to Fox, the Float RC2-36 can be spaced (fixed) for any maximum travel between 100 - 160 mm in 10 mm increments using their various length spacers, so I would space mine for 140 mm as I really like my F140 RLC now.

    My question was whether or not I'm going to be slowed down climbing by the extra 1 lb of weight on the fork as compared to the F 140 RLC that I have now.

    (I find the Mojo climbs so well that I have no desire to lock it into a lower travel when climbing, so I am not considering the Talas, which doesn't have a setting at 140 mm anyway.) Thanks.

  4. #4
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    Extra 1 lb in your fork will not slow down your climbing any more than 1 lb of extra water in your CamelBak. The added weight in the fork will even keep your front wheel down better in steep climbs.

  5. #5
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    thanks....was wondering about all the times I'm helping my front wheel up over rocks on not-smooth singletrack climbing.

  6. #6
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    Float RC2

    I maybe wrong but by rearranging the spacers only changes the travel I don't believe that the height of the Fork is changed in any way. That means that the geometry of the bike would be altered. Making it harder to climb. Thats just the way that the older Fox Forks (07') were built. I would call Fox to verify, just trying to help!!
    Cheers!!

  7. #7
    www.derbyrims.com
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    I can't feel a pound weight more, or less, when riding. Adding 3 pounds (like a heavy old NiCd battery in a water bottle mount for lights) and I begin to notice the weight when steeper climbing.

    If you are racing to exhaustion, a stop watch might show a 10 seconds difference in an hour with 1 pound extra weight, which could mean the difference in first and 10th place. But for any other riding the performance difference of 1 pound difference is only mental.

    A pound more in the fork would help keep the wheel on the ground to make steep climbing and climbing switchbacks slightly easier.

    But before spending big bucks for a stiffer fork, be sure your front wheel spokes are very tight. Use double-butted 2.0/1.8, no less, for a low flex wheel. Revolution spoked wheels are flexy and weak, for racing and smooth-pack only. This will make more difference than a stiffer fork.

    Also bigger stansions will have more stiction from more seal surface area. You will loose some small bump compliance going to a 36mm if coming from the same brand 32mm fork.

    The 36 would be better for big jumps and big rock riding. 32mm stansions are plenty at 140mm, even 160mm travel for most rough trail riding if your wheels and tires are well tuned.

  8. #8
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    The height IS adjusted when stacking the spacers, so you can keep a pretty stock geometry while rockin' the Float 36. Hope that helps ya man. Cheers

  9. #9
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    The Float 36 is 20mm higher then a 32 fork, so if you want the same lenght as the 32 at 140mm, you will need to set it at 120mm

  10. #10
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    Rollon (or Push) before a 36

    Quote Originally Posted by rshalit
    ---I hates to admit being a weight-weanie.... but after 6 months on a 32 mm Fox Float 140 RLC (which I quite like) I'm thinking of putting a Float RC2 (36 mm) onto Mojo (with same travel) which would increase the fork weight by 1 lb -- the benefit would be that the many technical babyheads and roots riding out here (SW NH) would be even more stable at speed, I think.
    So I was wondering if anyone has experience with adding/subracting a pound of fork on Mojo -- during climbing, especially those many times I'm lifting the front wheel up over rocks in the trail, if these situations would be noticeably more difficult and slow with the extra 1 lb on the front end? thanks
    I wander if the expense of the move to the 36 is justifiable to get better high speed performance

    I thought for a while to do the same, because I was not happy at all with my float, that felt choppy at speed (besides never going to full travel). In particular on multiple roots, or rock garden, the fork felt "unstable": it introduced unwanted lateral movement.

    Now I have installed the Rollon external air chamber (see http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...45#post3728845 ) and the fork is a completely different animal: plush, highly responsive, it gets full travel. In particular all the lateral movement has disappeared (on the same test tails), and as a consequence it feels like a much more rigid fork. (Of course it is not, it is its response that has changed so much that it feels so.)

    The Rollon modification might not be for everybody (to begin with is very cheap!!!) but my suggestion is that before you spend a zilion dollars on a 36 you may want to consider the Rollon or the PUSH mods (although those are very expensive).

    Fox is quite horrible at improving their forks (all they do is to increase travel or stanchions diameter ) but there is quite lot of untapped performance in in a Float
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    Last edited by Davide; 11-16-2007 at 03:50 PM.

  11. #11
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    Just buy a RS Pike. It's a lot stiffer than a 32mm Fox, but not too tall like a 36mm would be.

  12. #12
    MOJO BICHU
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    i installed a 32 vanilla in mi mojo, and it works great.

  13. #13
    HIKE!
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    20mm thru axle alone makes the Pike a winner.... and it happens to be a good fork, too. On par with Fox's offerings in the 32 family.

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