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  1. #1
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    Fork for Ripley?

    I demo'd a Ripley a few months back, and loved it. Only reason I didn't get one was it didn't really feel that great on the descents. I recently put a Pike on a TRc and now the TRc feels like a mini-DH bike. Amazing the difference it made. Was thinking the Ripley could perhaps be similarly transformed, but not sure if a 140mm fork would screw up the way the bike handles. I know Ibis says 140mm fork OK, but wanted to hear feedback from anyone who is running a 140 on their Ripley. Even better if could get feedback from anyone who has put a Pike on it. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Dude...
    Reputation: ebry74's Avatar
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    I have a Pike on my Ripley and love it. I also have a jet 9 and a 5spot that I plan to sell now since I don't anticipate riding either of them now.
    Quote Originally Posted by BBW
    Its amazing how easy somebody can make 10.000 posts making such stupid comments.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ebry74 View Post
    I have a Pike on my Ripley and love it. I also have a jet 9 and a 5spot that I plan to sell now since I don't anticipate riding either of them now.
    Thanks. I used to have a 5 Spot. I did feel the Ripley climbed much better than the Spot, and was much faster bombing around singletrack, but definitely did not handle the DH oriented trails as well as the Spot. Do you have Pike 140 or 150? Interested to hear your comparisons to the 5Spot as I am familiar with it as point of reference. thanks!

  4. #4
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    I also have a Pike (150/120 dual position air) on my Ripley. On long climb, I usually set it to 120. On short climb, I don't bother to change the travel to 120. Love the Pike. Perfect for Downieville trails.

  5. #5
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    Fork for Ripley?

    I have a 140/120 talas. I prefer up and down better at 120. The steering just feels better. At 140 it feels like the wheel wants to flop in the turns just a little. Coming from a Mojo HD the only downside I see is pedal strikes on stair climbs. I was surprised at how well it descends in 120. Rock gardens great, fast turns great. Have not tried realy rocky chunk yet(slow 1-2 foot drops), but assume HD would be better there.

  6. #6
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    Fork for Ripley?

    Have a fox 140 spaced down to 130. Nice happy medium.

  7. #7
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    I have a 140mm Pike on my Ripley. When trying to decide between that and a 120mm fork, I was concerned that the 140mm might be too tall, especially for steep climbs - particularly since I'd been riding travel-adjust forks for the previous 10 years and was used to reducing travel for those climbs. But feedback on the 140mm forks was positive and I was interested in maximizing the downhill fun, so I went with the Pike. That was a great decision! I almost never feel like the fork is too tall, and never have trouble with the steepest climbs. (Well, it's never the fork's fault, anyway!) I find the Ripley amazingly quick.

    Now, it might be quicker with a 120mm fork so it depends on what you are looking for. A friend just compared my Ripley with a Turner Czar with 100mm fork, and he said the Czar was noticeably more nimble in some sections. That is probably true, but without the back-to-back comparison, I have never felt like my Ripley was sluggish. My friend also commented that the difference on a rocky technical downhill was huge - much smoother and more control on the Ripley. THAT's why I got the Pike! It seems like the perfect combination to me: stiff and lightweight frame with a great suspension for climbing, and then a beefy fork for the descents. Very nice.

  8. #8
    Arrrghhh!!!
    Reputation: insighter's Avatar
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    I heard that someone out there was running an angleset with a 120mm travel fork on the Ripley, and besides the loss of travel found it to track better while still bombing the downhills. Anyone out there try this?
    The great use of life is to spend it for something that will outlast it.
    William James

  9. #9
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    Fork for Ripley?

    Climbing in 140 was not a real issue for me coming from a HD, also keep in mind for the downs the talas is still 1cm taller in 120 mode than the 32 float and is stiffer at 34. I don't know about the pike, and not sure how much this slackens HA

  10. #10
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    One other thing that I think gets overlooked in fork discussions is tire choice. I believe it was Dave Weagle himself that chimed in on a previous thread to point out that increasing tire size has the same effect as slackening head angle in terms of steering response.

    The Specialized 2.0/2.1 tire combo that comes spec'd on the Ripley is pretty skinny. I had similarly skinny tires on my 120mm-forked Ripley, and found them to be very snappy edge-to-edge but to be not terribly confidence-inspiring while descending, particularly in the wet & rooty conditions typical in the PNW.

    I swapped out the front to a Nobby Nic 2.25, and I really like that setup. The bike is still plenty lively, but the steering a just a tad calmer and the bike feels more composed at speed and down hill, while still keeping the lighter weight, lower bar height and better climbing efficiency of the 120 fork. YMMV, but for what I want from the bike (aggressive XC/endurance riding & racing) this setup seems ideal.

  11. #11
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    I went with the 35 mm, 140mm Pike and it handles waaaayy beter than the wimpy 120mm options. I just moved my seat a bit forward to weight the front wheel on climbs. the 120 was unrideable for me but I am coming of 67 head angles on 6" travel bikes. The short wheelbase and the 68.5 head angle makes this 29r very responsive.

  12. #12
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    I didn't try the 120 because I wanted the 34mm stanchions, so I got the 140 Fox.....I freaking love it!
    A bicycle will take you to fantastic places....if you let it.


    Ibis fan since '08 now rolling on the big wheeled Ripley.

  13. #13
    Too Much Fun
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    Go 34+

    I'm not in the market for a Ripley, though it's a brilliant bike.

    IMO, if you ride technical trail, 34+ stanchions are where it's at. I just love the control and steering precision on those forks when the trail gets into the ruff stuff. Point + shoot.

    When I get back on a 32 fork it just feels less precise.

    The Fox 34 (2014!) and the Pike are both what I would go-to if I was building a Ripley right now.

    If you're a lighter weight rider and all you're riding is buff trail all day, every day then the 32/120 would be fine.
    - -benja- -

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