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  1. #1
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    Fork for Mojo HD

    Hi, guys!

    Coming soon, I will be a new and proud Ibis Mojo HD owner, but at present, I haven't decided yet all components that I'm going to put in the bike.

    In this case, I have a dilemma with the fork. I have the folowing Fox options:

    - Fox Float CTD 160 mm
    - Fox Float RC2 160 mm
    - Fox Talas CTD 160 mm

    What do you think is the best option for this bike?


    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Well,

    For trail riding go with the 34 float ctd(160mm)
    For jumps and DH, go with a 36 float (180mm or 160mm)

    I don't think you need the talas at 160mm.

  3. #3
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    Fork for Mojo HD

    Building mine, used last years 36mm float. I rode a demo with the 34mm 160mm talas. Don't need talas, the CTD will be interesting on the rear

  4. #4
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    Float 36 RC2 or the 180 TALAS RC2 if you do a lot of steep climbs. I'm not sure of the point of lockout on a 160mm travel fork when you can dial most/all of the bob out with LSC.
    @pinkrobeyyc
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  5. #5
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    To give you a good answer, we need to know you're riding style and what kind of trails you mostly ride

  6. #6
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    Marzocchi 55 Rc3 ti

    Super Unknown

  7. #7
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    If you're not concerned about a little extra weight the 55 RC3 Ti is awesome and everyone that has a Vengeance Coil swears by them. If you're weight conscious a Bos Deville or Float (talas not necessary) but I think there are better alternatives to fox shocks front and back. I had a Lyrik solo air with the DH damper that I liked too.

  8. #8
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    Of the forks you posted the 36 Float RC2 makes the most sense. That being said I personally would be looking at the Lyrik or the Vengance. Do not get a Talas whatever you do. Way too much stiction and no need for it. I am running a 170 Lyrik and it climbs even the steep stuff great.

  9. #9
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    +1 on avoiding the Talas. After buying my HD with a Talas, I found that the HD climbs just fine with a 160mm fork, so I had no use for the travel reduction feature. So I rebuilt my Talas as a Float, and it is a much more responsive fork.

  10. #10
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    I have beat the snot out of a lyrik RC2DH solo air for 2 seasons and it's a great fork.

    I prefer it in the 160mm setting.

  11. #11
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    No Talas.
    Nice KOM, sorry about your penis.

  12. #12
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    Does anyone have the 34 Float CTD on the bike? The other option is 36 Float RC2 and i'm not sure which one should i take (-200g vs. RC2 damper)..

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinzone View Post
    Does anyone have the 34 Float CTD on the bike? The other option is 36 Float RC2 and i'm not sure which one should i take (-200g vs. RC2 damper)..
    Yes I have it. It's a good fork for trail riding. It will steepen the head angle slightly. Dropper post+ 70mm will fix it).

    Mine handled a 2' drop to rocks and roots with no problems at all.

    The 36 float RC2 is also a great choice, and if you're into fine tuning the bike , it does have more tuning options( high and low speed compression vs. one dial for compression on the CTD).

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yody View Post
    To give you a good answer, we need to know you're riding style and what kind of trails you mostly ride
    You have all the reason... Well, I prefer descending than climbing although I don't practise downhill. Because of the people that I ride with, sometimes I have to climb (they don't like descending) but I would like to increase my descending skills.

  15. #15
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    Of your choices and the fact that your more interested in downhill performance I would get the fox 36mm rc2. If your close to or over 200lbs, thats another reason to go 36mm fork. I have a float 36mm on my HD and don't feel it's heavy or slows me down on the climbs. Another thing to consider is the 36mm forks only come in 20mm axle, while the 34mm forks only come in 15mm axle so If you already have a wheelset that may need to be considered.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by fuenstock View Post
    Of your choices and the fact that your more interested in downhill performance I would get the fox 36mm rc2. If your close to or over 200lbs, thats another reason to go 36mm fork. I have a float 36mm on my HD and don't feel it's heavy or slows me down on the climbs. Another thing to consider is the 36mm forks only come in 20mm axle, while the 34mm forks only come in 15mm axle so If you already have a wheelset that may need to be considered.

    Agreed, at 200lbs love the 36, and the extra pound could easily come off of somewhere else...

  17. #17
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    It is less than 1/2 lb difference from the 34 to the 36. The HD was designed around a 545-565 mm A2C which is the 36/Lyrik/Vengance forks. It deserves something in that category. If you are going for an HD 140 go for the Fox 34.

  18. #18
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    If you're not practicing Downhill riding and you do a lot of climbing and many of your friends are into XC. I would go with the 34 Float CTD. Its lighter, more linear, and the tiny bit shorter axle to crown length will make the bike turn quicker and handle faster. The 36 series are really intended to be ridden very hard, especially the RC2 which has the high speed compression circuit for hucking and very hard nose first landings. The 36 RC2 is going to feel very progressive spring curve and you won't be using as much of the travel. It will be taller and harder to steer, and will be heavier and use a wheel with a heavier hub. The 34 might not be as aggresive than the 36, but it is still quite a good fork and is very stiff, and the spring curve will likely work better for you.

  19. #19
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    Fwiw,

    If you read Bike magazine's bible of bike tests ( Hans posted it on the forum previously) they review the HD with the 34 CTD.

    If you read pink bike.com's review of the HD, they review it with the 36. 160mm.

    That might help you make up your mind.

  20. #20
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    No, I don't practise downhill, I usually do All mountain and sometimes XC, although what I like to do is descending and I would like to be better doing it (but I repeat, not downhill).

    About my weight, I'm 176 lbs (80 kg).

    I don't know what has happened in USA according to Fox CTD system, but in my country (Spain), I have read in some forums that this sistem has broken down a lot of times, so I'm worried about the fact of choose this system for my next fork...

  21. #21
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    Havent heard of one single problem with the ctd.....

  22. #22
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    Fork for Mojo HD

    I was actually more impressed with the stiffness of the 34, the dampening not so much. I just left it in trail mode. However, I weigh 225 and use a 32 on my SL- so anything seems better. No way would I dick with a 34 when a 36 is only 1/2 lb lighter. Having said that, I'd love to try a 34 on my SL, if the ever make a straight 1-1/8 steerer. Might try the vengeance on the SL but its 1" taller, might chopper it out too much

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yody View Post
    Havent heard of one single problem with the ctd.....
    In Spain, a lot of new Fox forks with CTD system have been sended to Warranty Service.

    Because of that, I'm worried about this option and I have been thinking in the posibility of choosing the RC2 one, but I don't know if this fork (Float 36 RC2 160 mm) will be too much for me and my skills...

  24. #24
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    I think the 34 would be a safe bet. You should go demo a bike with one on it.

  25. #25
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    What are you currently riding?

  26. #26
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    Double post
    Last edited by Lobanovskyy; 02-21-2013 at 12:50 AM.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yody View Post
    What are you currently riding?
    Scott Genius 10 (year 2012) and its fork is Talas 32 FIT RL 150-120 mm, but I'm gonna change to Ibis Mojo HD. By the way, I sell the Genius frame... It is practically new and not even scratched...

  28. #28
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    I went with the 36 RC2 on my HD and am very pleased. To the previous comment about the 36 being too progressive, have you ridden the fork being discussed (2013 RC2)? My 2013 is the most linear feeling air fork from Fox that I have been on, and I am able to get full travel while setting the pressure where I want it for all around riding. The high and low speed compression adjustments are worth a lot to me, and I don't miss a lockout or 'climb' feature.

  29. #29
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    I've got a Rockshox Revelation WC on mine. My motive for wanting travel adjust has little to do with climbing. Bikes with shorter travel forks and lower front ends corner better. Give me some flowy trails with few rocks, and I'll rock the low setting all day.
    I went with RS cause their travel adjust is dialed, vs issues with the Talas.
    Oh, and it's very light and feels very stiff with the tapered headtube.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian_Pal View Post
    I went with the 36 RC2 on my HD and am very pleased. To the previous comment about the 36 being too progressive, have you ridden the fork being discussed (2013 RC2)? My 2013 is the most linear feeling air fork from Fox that I have been on, and I am able to get full travel while setting the pressure where I want it for all around riding. The high and low speed compression adjustments are worth a lot to me, and I don't miss a lockout or 'climb' feature.
    Sounds good. Surprised to hear its so linear

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by buildyourown View Post
    I've got a Rockshox Revelation WC on mine. My motive for wanting travel adjust has little to do with climbing. Bikes with shorter travel forks and lower front ends corner better. Give me some flowy trails with few rocks, and I'll rock the low setting all day.
    I went with RS cause their travel adjust is dialed, vs issues with the Talas.
    Oh, and it's very light and feels very stiff with the tapered headtube.
    I had this fork before going to a Vengeance HLR Air, it is a super great fork and highly recommended.

  32. #32
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    the revelation is definitely the lightest option. a regular dual position 150/120 rlt-ti is 3.81lbs.

    the rev world cup is like 3.49lbs.

    Crazy light for a six inch fork.

  33. #33
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    I'm running a RC2 dh Lyric at 170mm and don't find a need for travel adjust. It's slightly slow at low speed but very responsive once your moving. If you're running the HD AT 160 it really seems to suit the bike and is very confidence inspiring on big drops and rock faces. I was going to run something a little smaller like a 34 but Jeff@Ibis suggested that the bike would feel under gunned-I have to agree.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by stoats View Post
    I'm running a RC2 dh Lyric at 170mm and don't find a need for travel adjust. It's slightly slow at low speed but very responsive once your moving. If you're running the HD AT 160 it really seems to suit the bike and is very confidence inspiring on big drops and rock faces. I was going to run something a little smaller like a 34 but Jeff@Ibis suggested that the bike would feel under gunned-I have to agree.
    Amen brother! I am running the 170 RC2DH as well and really like it. Don't even notice the extra height after a few rides even on very steep climbs. Putting a 34/Revelation on this bike will really hold it back from what it could be on the descents.

  35. #35
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    No love it seems for the Talus, but I have no idea how everyone makes steep climbs without dialing the fork down. Here in CO where we have a lot of long climbs with steeper sections peppered in I always am dialing the fork up and down depending on what I'm climbing. On other bikes I never used the feature, but on the HD I use it multiple times every ride and wouldn't clear a number of sections without it.

  36. #36
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    It is just body position. My found my limit on Sunday was a 19.7% grade. That was more traction and the fact that we had been climbing for 20 minutes when we got to that section. One of the other people in our group rode it with a HD/Lyrik 170 setup.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    Amen brother! I am running the 170 RC2DH as well and really like it. Don't even notice the extra height after a few rides even on very steep climbs. Putting a 34/Revelation on this bike will really hold it back from what it could be on the descents.
    Quote Originally Posted by buildyourown View Post
    I've got a Rockshox Revelation WC on mine. My motive for wanting travel adjust has little to do with climbing. Bikes with shorter travel forks and lower front ends corner better. Give me some flowy trails with few rocks, and I'll rock the low setting all day.
    I went with RS cause their travel adjust is dialed, vs issues with the Talas.
    Oh, and it's very light and feels very stiff with the tapered headtube.
    Its all relative to the rider and the skills, I disagree with both these opinions, better skills allow riders at both ends of either spectrum to do either as well if not better, its the rider that holds things back, obviously there is a limit when all things are equal, but rarely do I see this in normal riding situations, bike parks might be different, then it comes down to rider preference, everything is a compromise when riding and terrain also has a big effect.

    Great you both like those forks for those reasons though.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by stoats View Post
    I'm running a RC2 dh Lyric at 170mm and don't find a need for travel adjust. It's slightly slow at low speed but very responsive once your moving. If you're running the HD AT 160 it really seems to suit the bike and is very confidence inspiring on big drops and rock faces. I was going to run something a little smaller like a 34 but Jeff@Ibis suggested that the bike would feel under gunned-I have to agree.
    I definitely understand your point of view, but I am an edge of the envelope kind of rider and Ibis is saying the same thing. This bike was designed around a 545-565 A2C in 160 mode. I would say that a 34 in 160/150 mode would be awesome on an SL-R/HD140 and match the traits of those bikes very well.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaBelle23 View Post
    No love it seems for the Talus, but I have no idea how everyone makes steep climbs without dialing the fork down. Here in CO where we have a lot of long climbs with steeper sections peppered in I always am dialing the fork up and down depending on what I'm climbing. On other bikes I never used the feature, but on the HD I use it multiple times every ride and wouldn't clear a number of sections without it.
    Lots of love for the TALAS here! My riding area is a lot like the CO front range [I rode around near Golden a couple years back], and the TALAS makes the difference between fighting the climb and just riding it.
    @pinkrobeyyc
    #pinkrobeyyc

  40. #40
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    Oh, what a pity! I haven't placed the order yet (Ibis Mojo HD) and I was decided to choose a black Fox Float 36 RC2 160 travel but Ibis has just deleted this option on his website and this model in this colour is not available in 2013 (only white and I don't like it).

    So, I'll have to choose other option. Maby Fox Float 34 CTD 160 travel or Fox Talas 36 RC2 180/140 travel. Which of these two options would yo recommend me?

  41. #41
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    The 36 180 is a 'big' fork - definitely a greater divide between that and the 34...before worry any more about the decision I'd call up Ibis to see if that black RC2 160 is really off the table, perhaps they can still put the package together for you...
    ride, eat, sleep, repeat

  42. #42
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    I ran a 36 Foat 180 and changed to a Float 160. To my opinion the 160 fits the Bike a lot better for daily use, handles mor cmpact and is not raked out like with 180. Still I have an old Totem to slap on the bike for the really rough trails.

  43. #43
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    X-Fusion Vengeance HLR DLA...best fork I have ever used! 170-140 at the flick of a dial and stiff and plush as anyone would want.

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