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  1. #1
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    Which Fork for Carbon Mojo?

    Carbon Mojo on its way in a few weeks so thinking which fork. What are you guys who are are already riding using. Any feedback. Scot is going with a Float but I like to reduce travel for climbs....which shall it be Talas? Pike? DUC? or Float? or Pace 41? or Zochi?
    Choice! choice! What your 2c worth?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by kidsuma
    Carbon Mojo on its way in a few weeks so thinking which fork. What are you guys who are are already riding using. Any feedback. Scot is going with a Float but I like to reduce travel for climbs....which shall it be Talas? Pike? DUC? or Float? or Pace 41? or Zochi?
    Choice! choice! What your 2c worth?
    Do you have a 20mm t/a wheel? If so, get the pike 454 air uturn. I love mine.

  3. #3
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    20mm hub

    Yea I got one....are you running the Pike with the Mojo? I had a Pike on a 5 Spot and felt it was a touch long, even though everyone including DT raves about the combo I felt the Pike changed the feel of the bike in a direction I didnt like. Perhaps the same with the Mojo...hence the question.

  4. #4
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    Unless you set your seat far behind the center of the seat tube, the Mojo climbs easily with the 140mm Fox (or others with same axle to crown, such as the Manitou Elite I'm using).

    The Mojo seat tube angle is Norba XC race standard 73 degrees, bottom bracket is low at static sag near where an XC hardtail is. But most important for climbing is there no squat! Unlike every other design except a few VPP and high monopivot the dw-Link doesn’t squat the frame into slack angles which make other full suspension designs so much harder to climb.

    Some designers such as Turner and others copying his designs such as Ellsworth use very steep seat tube angles, 74 degrees on their climbing oriented bikes to keep the rider weight over the pedals when their designs squat rearward when climbing. The platform shocks needed for decent pedaling efficiency on those designs don't eliminate climbing angle static squat.

    Before deciding on the Mojo, I bought the wind down Manitou Elite to use on a 5 - 6 inch travel trail bike thinking I'd need to lower the front for climbing to keep the front wheel on the ground. But to my surprise the Mojo climbs easier than any other I've ridded in over 25 years of modern era trail bike riding, and in my whole life for that matter. I say "modern era" for the trail bike popular marketing trend that took off in the early '80's. Because I as well as many others used to ride cow, deer, and hiking trails on Sting-Ray bikes and other "balloon" tired bikes as kids long before the '70's.

    If you get an adjustable travel fork, get it for increasing length for downhill runs or extreme conditions where a slacker angle might help. I'm sure you'll find you won't need to lower travel below 140mm for climbing.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by kidsuma
    Yea I got one....are you running the Pike with the Mojo? I had a Pike on a 5 Spot and felt it was a touch long, even though everyone including DT raves about the combo I felt the Pike changed the feel of the bike in a direction I didnt like. Perhaps the same with the Mojo...hence the question.
    I have a 5-spot and I found the bike bery sensitive to changes in fork AC. I started the life of my Spotty with a MARZ Z1 and I just hated it: it felt like I was riding a chopper, I went to the reccomanded Fox Vanilla (this was 2003 125mm travel) and the bike was more balanced. This is not something that is specific to Spotty, I had the same problem with other Horsts and the feeling is that the bike squats backward if you use too long a fork (as Derby mentions below). I am now using a Fox 130 in front but I need to put quite a lot of pressure in the rear shock (PUSH) to climb efficiently, too low pressure and I am back into chopper-land (and bobbing). It is life with traditional linkage bikes, I don't know if you noticed but PUSH is marketing a 5.75" linkage that is supposed to correct 5-spot geometry for use with Fox 140 or Pike. I am personally saving $$ for the IBIS
    Last edited by Davide; 10-22-2006 at 12:13 PM.

  6. #6
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    [/QUOTE] I'm sure you'll find you won't need to lower travel below 140mm for climbing.[/QUOTE]


    Hey thats great! Many thanks ....now I understand Scot's recommendation of the 07 Float.

  7. #7
    Baby Bear is in the house
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    that said...

    My dream setup would be a Mojo (or an IH MKIII) with a Fox 36 TALAS (assuming Fox has fixed the travel loss issues of '06). Set it at 130mm for general trail riding, drop it down to 100mm for climbs, and extend to 160mm for the descents


    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    Unless you set your seat far behind the center of the seat tube, the Mojo climbs easily with the 140mm Fox (or others with same axle to crown, such as the Manitou Elite I'm using).

    If you get an adjustable travel fork, get it for increasing length for downhill runs or extreme conditions where a slacker angle might help. I'm sure you'll find you won't need to lower travel below 140mm for climbing.
    Better to have and not need it, than to need it and not have it.

  8. #8
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    Which fork has the most Mojo? I think that I may have an answer.

    I'm soon to be the proud father of a Medium Mojo carbon ( color Guiness foam) I'm throwing on a Fox Talas Rlc on mine. I have never had a problem with this fork in the past, But if I wasn't such a Fox fan I would try one of the Marzocchi forks I have heard good stuff about there forks.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    If you get an adjustable travel fork, get it for increasing length for downhill runs or extreme conditions where a slacker angle might help. I'm sure you'll find you won't need to lower travel below 140mm for climbing.
    I agree that the Mojo is exceptional at climbing but I have found that reducing travel digs it in even deeper. Below I quote from my initial review of the Pace Fighter fork on my Mojo. There is another Mojo rider in that thread (Your fork of choice for the Mojo) that also found it helpful to reduce travel on steeps. I wrote:

    4. The lockdown improves the steeps and turns itself off when full travel is needed. I have tried some steep climbs where my Blur LT would get light in the front end if I did not reduce travel or really weight the front myself. With the Mojo, these same steeps cause only a little bit of lightness and NO wandering of the front wheel, even with the 150mm fork. However, using this fork's "lockout' does improve even this. What Pace calls lockout is really "lock-down" (up to 90mm reduced travel) with active reserve travel (of at least 50mm) and the launch control is a speed-bump sensitive release for the lock down. On those same climbs where the front gets a bit light, I have repeated the climb with the fork locked-down (shortened fork / reduced travel) and the rear digs in like mad while the front remains glued down. This combination allows a greater range of effective climbing speed, cadence, and riding posture. I also expect that it will greatly enhance climbing muddy hills because this is where I noticed the greatest climbing improvements of a shortened fork on the Blur.

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