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  1. #1
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    Ex-DH rider needs Ibis Help

    I quit downhilling last year for a safer alternative that I wouldn't need lift access for; All mountain riding. I inherited a 2012 Mojo SL (and goodies) from the old man, so I would like some advice as far as parts and setup go....
    The bike is a size large and came with a bunch of extras. I am 6'0 tall and 180 pounds with pretty average limbs for my height.

    Is there any way to slack out the head angle on this? It already has a 150mm fork that I wont replace.

    Is the Lopes-Link actually worth it, since I like my drops and hard riding?

    The bike came with a thomson elite setback post which I wont replace. Would a short stem not be recommended on a bike like this at my height?

    Any insight/help is much appreciated.....

  2. #2
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    Lopes link is worth it. As is running a 10mm bolt through.
    Set it up with a short stem and wide 750 plus bars. At 6 foot you may want 70mm instead of a 50mm that I run.
    DW links don't mind a bit of sag. 35%-40 is what I typically run. It keeps the back in check on the steep stuff. with a 150mm fork you will have prob ended up with a bout 67.5 degrees. Some headset manufacturers make a +5 - +20mm stack that sits on the top of the fork. helps raise the front a bit and slacken out a touch.

  3. #3
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    If your bike doesn't have a Lopes link it probably also has an old version of the lower link. I would recommend getting a new lower link as well as the Lopes link. I found that the newer version of the lower link made more of a difference in stiffness than either a 10mm bolt up or the Lopes link. I only weigh about 75-76Kgs so it might be different for larger riders. I broke my lower link but it was a very old revision on 2007 Mojo C as I had bought spares early on and didn't know they had updated the design. The lower link made so much difference that I don't bother with the 10mm bolt up anymore. I converted my 10mm bolt up wheelset to 12 x 142 when I bought an HD last year and now my Mojo C just has a standard 10 X 135 QR wheel and I don't notice any difference in stiffness compared to the 10mm bolt up.

  4. #4
    aka dan51
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    If your frame does not have a Lopes link it's not a 2012. That link has been on all mojos since 2009. If it is a 2012, then it probably also has the newer lower link, since those have been standard since 2011 I believe.

    I recommend getting an HD 140 frame and swapping all the parts, then sell the SL frame. HD is slacker and can be slackened, plus it's a burly frame.

    If not, short stems are fine. Most riders seem to like 70mm on them best.
    Those who know, ride a Mojo AND a Mojo HD.
    Quadzilla
    Quote Originally Posted by benja55
    Ok, whatever, cold water on my bike boner right there.

  5. #5
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    Alnother way to slack the frame is using a 27.5 (650b) front wheel. A 27.5 wheel with 2.3 tire would likely clear your 150mm fork, if there is more than 1/2 inch clearance to the arch and crown at bottom-out with your current 26" wheel.

    This will slack the frame angles 1/2 degree, and the larger radius wheel without angle change adds steering trail, when combined with the slacker frame angle, feels like 1 degree slacker.

    Offset shock mount bushings could gain another .3 slacker frame angles. But check bottom travel for tire to seat tube clearance.

  6. #6
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    Having just done the same, ex DH rider last year, semi DH retired haha

    I run a HD140 with a Fox 34 150 fork.

    What fork did you get with this setup?

    Being a DH rider you like me probably ride a bit differently, excessive sag may not be the answer and will only compound a poor front end setup with steeper HA.

    I went the other way, usually do I wanted my fork stiffer more progressive, done! and Im loving it, I might still play around with the rear sag, too see if I can get extra grip when I get a bit tired for boosting instead of plowing but I can still hang in they're with guys on longer travel, it takes a bit more strength to ride a harder setup, But since you're a DH rider you should be used to this.

    Unless you've had dwl before in my experience with everyone Ive ridden including VPP, Maestro, etc anti squat also puts more pressure on a soft front end and slow rebound fork setups common on most peoples bikes and way too fast rear rebounds amplifies this, I see riders comment allot on instability on mini link bikes to me the fork stem bar set up in that order is the problem, not the head angle, not the wheelbase.

    Ive come off of one of the longest wheelbases and lowest bb bikes in the market in the 150-160 category and comparing the Mojo HD which is an inch shorter in wheelbase .5mm higher in BB it is a very stable and cornering demon, my ride style maybe suited too dunno, but Ive always like long low designs and wide so I have been surprised by this.

    I run a large frame, 5.11,5 height, 50mm stem 760mm wide bars.

    I run closer to 20% sag rear 25% front, the shock is stock no tuning other than rebound, don't use ctd full open DH, 200 psi, 3 clicks from full slow rebound.

    Fork has been lowered to 150mm/ 34 ctd, trail mode, mid compression setting, 100psi
    8 clicks out from full slow.

    Note my fork has been internally adj to be more progressive 20cc fluid in air chamber, this affects rebound so mine might run a click or 2 slower to compensate, my fork rides high very balanced with DW link maintaining proper dynamic geo no matter what the terrain, I can just concentrate on what Im doing let the bike have its head, just like riding a DH bike, ride it out and hang it out haha.

    Looking at the Ibis site GEO I assume due to the build speccs on the Ibis site that 69deg ha is based on a 140mm fork? So 150mm should net you 68.5 depending on tires headset setup.

    Im all for modifications, but imo get base settings sorted first then modify to suit, I see far to many people jumping on anglesets, longer forks wheel sizes, shocks without getting the basics right to begin with then blaming the bike, spending **** loads of money of the wrong stuff.

    Follow your gut to start with, a DH background you should get pretty close then just fine tunning ya front and rear, the bike should do then rest, ideally an HD would have been good, but hey you got an SL handed to you which is pretty sweet, many struggle to justify and afford such a frame, we forget that here sometimes we are so lucky to ride own such bikes, so enjoy, set her up right and shred that baby.

  7. #7
    Mtb Guide
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    This might seem a little basic but I refer to Jarods comments below the 5 steps, Im no Jared but Ive followed these steps since I started in the late 80s, exception tubeless tires, just cant be arsed with them even though I know I could get more performance, might try a set when current ones are worn since I dont change tires much these days.

    5 steps I do to all my bikes before riding!

    Might be helpful to others more than you bkboom123

  8. #8
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    Thanks for all the suggestions....i actually pulled it all apart and see it does have a lopes link on it so that is a good sign

  9. #9
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    Don't mess with the bike too much...enjoy the way it was designed to ride, and adjust to it.

    I have an HD with a 180 fork on it and it doesn't ride like a DH bike either. Heck, I X-Country ride it all the time. It's burlier and slacker than a SL.

    The SL may have travel, but the IBIS' are snappy responsive bikes and pedal really well. Perfect AM bike IMO.

  10. #10
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    bkboom, what's the fork you're using?

  11. #11
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    Part of the cheap family discount price for the bike was a 2012 rock shox revelation ti fork, 150mm. I am trying to only spend $ 500 on remaining parts I need, or upgrades to make it more aggressive. Bike came with everything except shifters and a RD ( I picked up a x9 type 2 RD and x9 shifters, so there is money left to play around with )

  12. #12
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    Really my main fears, coming from DH, is not having enlighten rear travel and the steepness of the head tube angle. Either way I will make it work and have a blast riding it once the snow melts and its warmer then 6 degrees

  13. #13
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    You'll probably adapt to it quickly enough.
    That's a great fork, but unfortunately not the best for 650b compatibility. I had to file the arch out a little on mine to fit a Nevegal 2.35, and its really tight. Neo Moto 2.3 would fit a little better. 650b front would be a great upgrade though, and a very effective way to address your concerns.
    I agree with others here to take the slow approach and get it dialed in its current dress first. I would shoot for 30-35% rear sag, and if it wallows or bottoms too easily install one of Fox's volume reducer shims.....will only set you back about $20. (I'm assuming it has an RP23). Ample rear sag combined with Rockshox's longer than ibis spec A-C dimension should put you in the 68 - 67.5 HA range. Put some miles on that and you'll be able to spend the rest of your money wisely on short & wide stem/bar, offset shock bushings, 650b front, etc.

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