Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    No Tail-Just a Nub
    Reputation: sangmatt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    151

    Easton xc one wheels

    I'm looking at getting a mojo (SL build kit), but am wondering about the stock wheels (Easton xc one's)...how have these been working? They are pretty light, but I am wondering about an upgrade (?) to Crossmax SL's...thanks much...

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    421
    My suggestion.
    Ind 9 All Mountain with DT Swiss 4.2D . I had a wheelset with XTR hubs & DT Swiss 4.1d, but had to sell cause of the centerlock rotors.(they were a very good wheels 1740g) I tried the Crossmax SL's. I did'nt feel they were superior to the XTR's, But again i did'nt try going tubless.
    So far these wheels have been fantastic. They hookup quick when you want to hammer.
    That's my 2 cents.

  3. #3
    Downunder Mojophile
    Reputation: ozelise's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    28
    I had the XC 1s on my Mojo SL build but swapped them out for existing Crossmax SLs as I wanted the UST setup. I sold the XC 1s to my regular riding partner who despises UST. The XC 1 is lighter than the crossmax, but just as strong and haven't needed truing in the 5 months he's been riding with them. He considers them superior to the Xm819/DT Swiss cerits he was running previously. My opinion - swap to the Crossmax only if you want to go UST. Otherwise stick with the Eastons. I feel they also have the better hub.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Irrenarzt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    853
    Someone despises UST? They must've never tried stans.

  5. #5
    Downunder Mojophile
    Reputation: ozelise's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    28
    His theory is that UST rims are heavier (which they are) and he can go tubeless with normal rims, rim tape, non UST tyres and Stans. He has a point. Personally I prefer the security of UST tims and UST tyres.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Irrenarzt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    853
    Fair enough. For the weight weenie, Stans makes sense. I use stans on my 29er and when it is set up, it works well. The problem lies in getting it set up. I've bent rims, lost skin on my finger, broken a pinky finger, made a huge ass mess but once its in, you are good to go. None of this ever happened with UST.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    113

    Huge thumbs up on the Eastons

    I've been hammering them for over 8 months, they have nothing but praise for them. Very lightweight and tough, good engagement, smooth (and quiet) hub. These things retail for $600-$700, so it's a killer deal when you start breaking down the SL kit...

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ecibis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    329

    been good so far

    I've been riding the xc one's in rocky terrain for several months and they have been great. On several wipe outs I felt they would become untrue but they are still as true as when I got them despite bashing them into rocks on every ride. I9's are probably better, but I didn't want to pay the upcharge.....I should also note that I am 160lbs. and someone that is heavier may need wider rims like the Havocs.....

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    92
    I was a little skeptical about the easton wheel, I have been riding them on since December and have yet to have any problems. I would say I am very happy with them. I am doing the Transrockies in Aug and was thinking about getting a new set. At this point i have no reason to, these are great so far. I have the middle build kit, I think it's the SL. Everything is working well, my only complaint, though minor is the Hayes carbon brakes are so so. They do work but are not nearly as powerfull as the Avid Juicy 7s I had on my Nomad.

  10. #10
    When can I ride?
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    53
    I'm signed up for transrockies for 2008, I ran across this thread and was wondering how the transrockies was on your mojo and easton wheels. I'm looking to upgrade from my Mavic Crossrides for the race and I'm looking for some input.

    Thanks.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    13
    Easton XC-Ones are great. Great bang for the buck when included with a build kit from Ibis. At first I was hesitant about them, but after riding them since last May, I really like them. They are light and stay true. I am 180 lbs. with camelback on and they have served me well.
    Last edited by dignan22; 01-09-2008 at 10:22 PM.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    92
    transrockies was a blast, though a ton more fire road than I hoped and expected. The wheels did ok, bearing seem to have filled with lots of dust (as did everything). They didn't spin too well be day seven. They worked ok but I did sell them and purchased some Dave Thomas Speed Wheels. They are amazing, I love them, well worth the money. I went with Stans 355 hoops and DT Swiss 240 hubs, they are quiet, smooth, wider, and strong, I haven't had to true them yet. I did get them AFTER the Tranrockies though. I would highly recomend the upgrade. Look at the reviews for for Speed Wheels, basically all 5 chilis. They are also much lighter around 1740 grams or so.

    The only problems I had were with the brakes. The Hayes Carbons were very bad. I had to adjust them during the race everyday, they would overheat and drag like crazy. I didn't run tubless and not one flat. My partener had two flats with his tubeless. I now have the best and most expensive brakes I have ever had, the Formula Oro Puros. They too are amazing. No adjustments needed, quite, light and powerfull.

    Change your drivetrain right before the race. The best advice I have is to get there super early day one and try to start at the front. After about 10 min it was a 3800 foot hike with the bike up the hill, make sure you can hike in your shoes. We started in the middle and it cost us about 45 minutes or so. We rented our own RV, the tents are right on top of each other.

    Any other questions you have about the Mojo or TR just let me know. I would suggest some high intensity medium rides, I trained with way too many long rides thinking the race was going to take much longer. The problem was you really need to hammer the first 30 minutes or so as well as the last 30 minutes or so. It's super hard to pass on the single track lots of people, so the starts are key. We started with the full list of gear and had about 1/3 by the end of the race.

    The other item I swapped out on day 3 was tires. You really want something that can roll very well since they are big pace lines on the fire roads. I switched and I think it was about 30% easier. Go light with the tires, that is super important.

    There we 3 other Mojos all had no issues.

    Again, let me know if you have any additional question. Oh yeah, bring lots of chain lube as well as some during the day, the dust and rivers make for a loud drivetrain.

  13. #13
    When can I ride?
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    53

    Thanks for the pointers...

    Sounds like I may need to upgrade my brakes as well as my wheels, I've got HFX-9s and I haven't been real happy with them, I'm always fiddling with them. Due to the race fees, my upgrade budget isn't huge. I may go with my old BB7s for the race, I know they don't stop as well, but they are sure easy to use.

    Thanks for the training tips, I'm just now trying to put together a training plan for spring/summer. My training this time of year is shoveling snow and snowshoeing when I get the chance. I just can't seem to spend that much time in the basement on the trainer.

    Any specific tire recommendations?

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TMorales's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    29
    I liked the XC 1s but only run tubeless so I installed the Stan's kit and run them tubeless w/some UST Nevegals. Haven't had a single problem. They work as well as all the UST rims I've used (Stan's, Mavic, Bontrager) but have never once had to be trued.

  15. #15
    TelemarkTumalo
    Reputation: telemarktumalo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    42

    XC-One

    I've been riding the Easton's for about a year now on my Ripley... I'm running tubes and even after several pinch flats have yet to knock them from true or round. Admittedly, I'm 150 lbs and not that hard on wheels and central Oregon is pretty dry, but these really have been very strong. I agree that this was a great wheel in terms of bang for the buck. I bought mine on eBay NIB for $650.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    [SIZE="6"][/SIZE]"Dang! You got shocks, pegs. Lucky!

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    92
    I started with the Kenda Nevgals, I have always been happy with them. I also ride Continental Vertical Pros. There are a ton of other tires that I really like depending on the conditions. I really like WTB tires as well.

    All that being said for the Transrockes I give me a big huge thumbs up to the Kenda Karma's. I would definately use them again. They were adequate performance wise, still allowing me to ride almost almost everything, light (under 500g), reasonably priced when you find them on sale and LOW rolling resistance. Seriously it went from the riding being hard to keep up with a fast paceline with the Nevgals to pulling 15 riders with the Karmas, the only thing that changed was the tires. I would ride them a little before the TR to get used to them.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •