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Thread: Cable Crossover

  1. #1
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    Cable Crossover

    I believe Ibis recommends that the shifter cable be routed on the side of the headtube opposite the shifter. So are Mojo builders crossing the housings behind the headtube, prior to the stops? What about crossing cables halfway down the top tube?

    Any thoughts? Bad experiences? I'm trying to fit some narrow bars, which looks to be pretty tough with Sram triggers.

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    Cross them 1/2 way down the top tube .

    works fine ,looks good too. unless you have a small frame ,then it rubs

  3. #3
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    I started the IBIS way but switched to crossing in the middle and running the brake line down the center. I also had to zip tie the brake line just behind the front holders to keep it straight. I taped the top tube in case the cables rub which I don't thing they do if the cables are set up right. I also run my front brake line up the back of the fork which looks way better than running it through the fork and up the front. It's all very Zen like now.
    Last edited by 4212darren; 01-30-2008 at 07:00 PM.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by burkut
    I believe Ibis recommends that the shifter cable be routed on the side of the headtube opposite the shifter. So are Mojo builders crossing the housings behind the headtube, prior to the stops? What about crossing cables halfway down the top tube?

    Any thoughts? Bad experiences? I'm trying to fit some narrow bars, which looks to be pretty tough with Sram triggers.
    This is the way I do it, works like a charm (don't forget your rubber donuts if you do not use a plastic protection as in the right cable below)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davide
    This is the way I do it, works like a charm (don't forget your rubber donuts if you do not use a plastic protection as in the right cable below)
    I give you the credit for this idea Davide but I've got my brake line underneath the cables. Tie it there and it's a nice straight shot to the back of the TT and keeps the cables away from the frame.
    A bicycle will take you to fantastic places....if you let it.


    Ibis fan since '08 now rolling on the big wheeled Ripley.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4212darren
    I give you the credit for this idea Davide but I've got my brake line underneath the cables. Tie it there and it's a nice straight shot to the back of the TT and keeps the cables away from the frame.
    I would think the cables would cut in to the brake line that way. No?

    Burcut, I do it the Ibis suggested way, and yes, that is to cross the housing behind the headtube and before the stops.

    "I must not be crazy because I'm seriously questioning my sanity"

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    I would think the cables would cut in to the brake line that way. No?
    .
    Yep, I would be a bit worried to cut into the brake line with the cables on top of it eek: But maybe 4212darren is covering the cables with a light plastic housing ... Anyway "My" solution seems to give the straightest path possible ...

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    Cable cutting isn't an issue yet but I'll let you know if I see any abrasion. Looks so much cleaner than putting it on top. If I was worried about it i'd put a piece of tape on it.
    A bicycle will take you to fantastic places....if you let it.


    Ibis fan since '08 now rolling on the big wheeled Ripley.

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    My large frame Mojo was assembled by Keith at Over The Edge in Fruita, and he crossed the housings between the head tube and the stops on the TT. It looks clean and trouble-free, IMHO, plus I like the look of the cables running straight back along the TT. He also covered the shift cables with a light plastic black housing where they would have been exposed.

    He also added a stick-on brake line guide in the middle of the TT to keep the brake line from flopping about. Again, nice, clean and well-done.

    This bike is an XT build kit.

  10. #10
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    Not to everybody's taste

    Quote Originally Posted by 4212darren
    Cable cutting isn't an issue yet but I'll let you know if I see any abrasion. Looks so much cleaner than putting it on top. If I was worried about it i'd put a piece of tape on it.
    It is not to everybody's taste but what I do is to actually cover the 3 cables with a split nylon wrap (5 grams). It gives a bit of an internal cable routing look (and make the cables completely mud proof) and looks very clean.
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    Thanks all for the feedback.

    I've decided to cross before the cable-stops, over the top tube, and behind the seat tube. Just to cover all possibilities......

    On my large frame it seems that crossing mid-toptube will work with the cables ABOVE the rear brake hydraulic line. Depending on the thickness of the hydraulic line, those cables may not even touch it. In any event I'm using the Gore Ride-on cables so the sheathing should be protection enough.

    The trade off in the two set-ups seems to be this:

    Crossing housings BEFORE the stops does give a nice straight routing BETWEEN the stops. But those housings sure are bent.

    Crossing cables BETWEEN the stops gives a nice straight approach for the housing BEFORE the stops. But the cables exit the ferrules at an angle.

    I know past squeaky noises coming from the Mojo frame have been traced to the ferrules. So does one set-up behave better than the other in this regard?

  12. #12
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    The bend in the cable does not seem bad and has not been any sort of problem. Also, it does not bind on steering at all. I can ride no handed with no problem so there is no tension created by the bent housing on the handlebar. I still think it is the easiest and cleanest solution.
    cable routing.JPG
    IMG_4180.JPG


    ............____________________.................. ..

    As for the cable ferrule creaking: on my bike it only happens in muddy/rainy times and is caused by dirt in the ferrule nearest the seatpost on the right (going to the Rear dérailleur). That ferrule binds and twists just a tiny bit as the rear moves through travel but can make an unbelievably loud creaking echo in the carbon frame with just the right dirt and moisture in there.
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 02-01-2008 at 05:33 PM. Reason: fixed "front" der. to "rear", added pic

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    That makes sense. The angle of cables/housing may be less the culprit than suspension motion on that one cable stop.(right rear, I assume you mean the one leading to the 'rear' derailleur). Anyone have an easy solution to this?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by burkut
    That makes sense. The angle of cables/housing may be less the culprit than suspension motion on that one cable stop.(right rear, I assume you mean the one leading to the 'rear' derailleur). Anyone have an easy solution to this?
    Yes, the ferrule by the seatpost going to the rear dérailleur (I fixed it above where I said "front" d.).

    For a fix, I recently wrapped a piece of electrical tape around that ferrule. I'm hoping that works. I imagine dirt will still work it's way in with the suspension movement, but I'm hoping the soft tape layer will not create the same grinding noise.
    Last edited by noshortcuts; 01-31-2008 at 05:10 PM.

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  15. #15
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    My cables cross behind the seatpost. I do feel them touch my legs when peddling, but who cares. I would not be crossing on the top tube cause every time you standover the bike thay move under any body part that touches the TT. A big lumpy crossover may damage more than the brake cable in time.

  16. #16
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    Ridnparadise,


    Please post some visuals particularly the Xover behind the post. I would like to see how it looks like. TIA!
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    There was no need to scare potential buyers and burn bridges "buddy"
    Tell me now, what's Product testing all bout then?

  17. #17
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    Oops., posted it in the other cable thread...

    I wanted to add a couple of better pictures of how I have my cables routed. I do have a motorcycle brake setup, which means the front on the right and the rear on the left. I just find it more comfy after riding motorbikes for a long time.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by noshortcuts
    The bend in the cable does not seem bad and has not been any sort of problem. Also, it does not bind on steering at all. I can ride no handed with no problem so there is no tension created by the bent housing on the handlebar. I still think it is the easiest and cleanest solution.
    cable routing.JPG
    IMG_4180.JPG


    ............____________________.................. ..

    As for the cable ferrule creaking: on my bike it only happens in muddy/rainy times and is caused by dirt in the ferrule nearest the seatpost on the right (going to the Rear dérailleur). That ferrule binds and twists just a tiny bit as the rear moves through travel but can make an unbelievably loud creaking echo in the carbon frame with just the right dirt and moisture in there.
    what kind of cable housing is that and what material is it made from

  19. #19
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    On my small frame I needed to route the cables so that they come strait back from the forward stops over the TT to prevent rub. But on my frame crossing the cables before the front stops caused the housing to contact the headtube area with even the slightest turn of the bars so I decided to do it this way. It has been working flawlessly for the last year. Even though the piece of housing going from the rear TT stop to the F. der. stop looks a bit strained it works perfectly. There is no feeling of friction at all. Also it makes the driveside of the bike look super clean. If the housing is trimmed properly there is no contact between the housing and the rider either. When the suspension cycles it moves more back than out. Definitely not a conventional setup but I think it works well.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  20. #20
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    My routing is of the pastajet variety, but I am really intrigued by this latest one by sessionrider.

    The next time I get a chance I'll try this rear derailleur routing at the seat tube.

    sessionrider, did you tie the brake hose and the derailleur cable together at the seat tube. These pictures lose a bit in translation/shrinking.

  21. #21
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    yo ca,
    Yeah, I did. I used one small zip tie mainly to keep the brake cable from bowing out away from the seat tube. It also provides the added benefit of keeping either housing from repeatedly slapping the frame over rough terrain. I also used a jagwire aluminum stick on hose guide to keep the brake hose from making noise.

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