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  1. #1
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    But yet another question for Derby.....!

    Derby
    Now that there is a credible alternative to the Ibis Mojo in the Turner DW 5 Spot, and you had the choice again irrespective of cost which would you buy?
    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
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    Does it have a slacker head tube? How much more does it weigh?
    Keep the Country country.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogvet
    Derby
    Now that there is a credible alternative to the Ibis Mojo in the Turner DW 5 Spot, and you had the choice again irrespective of cost which would you buy?
    Thanks in advance
    Ibis Mojo - on a performance and handling feel basis... Same frame angles and handling geometry, much lower weight and almost the same stiffness, better pivot design for DWL traction potential having no friction bearings vs. sticky bushings, higher traction more stable and powerful floating brake link geometry, and clears 650b wheel with 2.3 tires. I don't drop my bike very often so the scratches in the finish aren't an issue for me and the clear finish of mine is easily cleaned up (not that I care much). And CF should out live aluminum in fatigue life many times over (my own proof is that I've broke half my aluminum frames in 2 years, my Mojo is nearing 4 years with no hint of weakness.)

    On a fashion and style basis... I'm a bit torn. I've always liked fundamental worked metal macho looking bikes such as Turner bikes, and I like the functional art and architecture of Ibis with the woman's eye for the higher life in style too.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    On a fashion and style basis... I'm a bit torn. I've always liked fundamental worked metal macho looking bikes such as Turner bikes, and I like the functional art and architecture of Ibis with the woman's eye for the higher life in style too.
    Derby---Are you subtly saying the Mojo is more girly?

    But seriously, I agree with Derby. The two bikes should ride very similarly, and while nobody would be disappointed with either bike, to me it mostly boils down to: 1) Weight (Mojo). 2) If you're a CF lover or hater (haters are fast becoming a small and lonely group). 3) Price (Mojo by $500). 4) Aesthetics (very subjective, judge for yourself):


  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by getbusyliving
    Derby---Are you subtly saying the Mojo is more girly?
    Ha! For those who don't know, Roxy Lo, http://www.roxylo.com/, did the artful finish design of the Mojo based upon the geometry requirements from the mechanical design engineers.

    I like that she took the opportunity possible with carbon fiber to bring more organic styling rather than some dude trying to make carbon fiber look like metal tubes like so many other CF frames.

  6. #6
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    Guys do you know if there is a frame redesign or "facelift" in the near future for the Mojo?

    regards

  7. #7
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    I wouldn't bet on it, especially not for the front triangle as it couldn't get much lighter and there's nothing else to improve.
    With some criticism over rear end stiffness and chainsuck I could imagine a new swingarm with a 135mm Maxle and HD style brake mount, but not for a few years.
    Keep the Country country.

  8. #8
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    New colors would be nice. I liked the old matte colors they used to have on the SL, but I guess those weren't very popular as the mojos are all glossy now except for the clear.

  9. #9
    MountainGoat aka OldGoat
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    Quote Originally Posted by getbusyliving
    But seriously, I agree with Derby. The two bikes should ride very similarly, and while nobody would be disappointed with either bike, to me it mostly boils down to: 1) Weight (Mojo). 2) If you're a CF lover or hater (haters are fast becoming a small and lonely group). 3) Price (Mojo by $500). 4) Aesthetics (very subjective, judge for yourself):

    Well said GBL
    Vote with your feet.
    No bike is perfect!

  10. #10
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    Derby
    Would a RS pike for be suitable for the front end of this bike? if so would it change the basic angles?
    How often have you had to change/swop the linkages, given that if I get one of these bikes it would be in the constant gloop and mud of the UK!
    Thanks in advance

  11. #11
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    Looks like the turner ran into an ugly tree..

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogvet
    Derby
    Would a RS pike for be suitable for the front end of this bike? if so would it change the basic angles?
    How often have you had to change/swop the linkages, given that if I get one of these bikes it would be in the constant gloop and mud of the UK!
    Thanks in advance
    A Pike works great on a Mojo, very precise steering. Most riders use a 140mm travel fork and the Pike is my personal favorite in this size. I used a Pike u-turn coil for over a year after being unsatisfied with flexy Fox 32/140 forks for my 200 lb weight. Later I went to a Lyrik u-turn coil to try longer travel for steep downhills, but I use 140mm travel most of the time, and 150mm when riding very rocky trails or fast long downhills.

    The upper Lopes Link bearings might last "forever", the load is not very heavy compared to the lower link. The lower link bearings when removed from the bike and rotating by hand will begin to get a notchy, index feel after about a year or so but still feel tight without slop or notchy action while on the bike for a much longer time. I did change my bearings before they needed it after having my Mojo for a year and a half as preventative maintenance, my second bearings are over 2 years old now, and the swingarm is still perfectly tight and moves freely without the shock attached.

    In your wet conditions, and really for anywhere, it would be good to add extra grease to the bearings, because the bearings don't have a lot of grease from the bearing factory. Remove the links when new or buying used and using a tip of a small knife or pin carefully peel way and remove the rubber seals on the bearing side faces you can access while still pressed in the link, and pack the bearings full with waterproof grease. The rubber seals easily press back on the bearings by hand. The bearings should last longer, especially in muddy conditions with the extra grease.

    Maybe some UK Mojo riders can comment on their bearing life expectancy.

    Hope this helps you.

  13. #13
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    Derby
    Looking at all the pics of Mojos you all seem to use longish stems, I run a bike with the same TT, similar angles (as large mojo I am 5'10) but a 50 mm stem so as be able to rag it downhills, all the mojos on here seem to set up as "up and along" rather than "along and down" giving the idea that these are long travel XC rather than full on trail bikes,
    Would this be a fair assumption?
    Thanks

  14. #14
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    Yes. The majority of the riders on her are fairly XC oriented and previous stem discussions have made it clear that many of them are very hesitant to try sub 90mm stems. There are plenty of us though using 50-70mm stems and 150-160mm forks. Check out the "AM builds" thread.
    Keep the Country country.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogvet
    Derby
    Looking at all the pics of Mojos you all seem to use longish stems, I run a bike with the same TT, similar angles (as large mojo I am 5'10) but a 50 mm stem so as be able to rag it downhills, all the mojos on here seem to set up as "up and along" rather than "along and down" giving the idea that these are long travel XC rather than full on trail bikes,
    Would this be a fair assumption?
    Thanks
    There is of course no agreed upon definition of XC vs. Trail vs. All Mountain, but I would argue that using a 50mm stem is not really a "trail bike" setup, but rather more of an "aggressive AM" setup. To me a trail bike is a "middle path" rig---about as happy climbing as it is hitting technical descents (up AND along AND down to use your terminology). This is where I think the Mojo's sweet spot is.

    I'm 1/2" taller than you and run a large frame w/ 90 stem and dropper seatpost, and this setup enables me to pretty much keep up w/ the short travel/hardtail bright spandex XC guys up tough climbs, and pretty much keep up with the guys on heavier 6.5" travel rigs down the gnarly stuff.

    Plenty of guys run short stems on their Mojos (I know Derby runs a shorter one), and I'm told that does transform it into more of a descender that can also climb pretty well. Now that there are choices, if I were looking for more of an AM rig with a 50 stem, I'd probably be looking seriously at the longer travel Mojo HD.

  16. #16
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    I don't think a 70mm stem hurts climbing if it isn't tall. A travel adjust fork gets my weight low and forward enough to climb fast on steeps.
    I'm 6'2" and ride an XL Mojo & DUC32 fork.
    Keep the Country country.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogvet
    Derby
    Looking at all the pics of Mojos you all seem to use longish stems, I run a bike with the same TT, similar angles (as large mojo I am 5'10) but a 50 mm stem so as be able to rag it downhills, all the mojos on here seem to set up as "up and along" rather than "along and down" giving the idea that these are long travel XC rather than full on trail bikes,
    Would this be a fair assumption?
    Thanks
    I run my Mojo with:
    50mm Stem
    Pushed Coil rear shock
    Lyrik Coil Fork
    2 chain rings with bash guard and chain guide.

    For me "up and along" is the necessary evil for the fun part "down and rip!". Luckily the Mojo is amazing in both directions. It is definitely much more in the AM realm than the XC realm. I consider it my Trail Bike (or my small bike) as opposed to my DH Bike (or my big bike).

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_owl
    Looks like the turner ran into an ugly tree..
    What do you mean?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by zzsean
    I run my Mojo with:
    50mm Stem
    Pushed Coil rear shock
    Lyrik Coil Fork
    2 chain rings with bash guard and chain guide.

    For me "up and along" is the necessary evil for the fun part "down and rip!". Luckily the Mojo is amazing in both directions. It is definitely much more in the AM realm than the XC realm. I consider it my Trail Bike (or my small bike) as opposed to my DH Bike (or my big bike).
    dogvet, my Mojo is set up the same as above, except for using a 70mm stem (I'm 6'1 with long arms on a large size), and my seat is back from center about 1 inch on a remote dropper AMP seat post. Below is a resent picture of my bike outfitted with fenders for the very muddy season here in NorCal's SF Bay Area. Fork is adjust to 140mm travel here, and I use 650b (27.5") wheels that raise the frame 1/2 inch.

    I found the Mojo climbs so easily that it can be biased more rearward in fit to better optimize downhill handling and still climb quite easily, even shorter climbs with the Lyrik u-turn fork extended up to 160mm travel.

    dogvet, aren't you on a Horst Link 5-Spot? You'll find the Mojo is just as capable downhill, maybe a little more so having a noticeably lower center of bike weight, and much easier climbing having no squat loss in geometry while climbing, using the same stem, bars, seat position you are comfortable now. The frame, wheelbase, BB height, all the geometry is exactly the same between the large DWL 5-Spot and large Mojo.

    If you want to go a large step further in AM/FR/DH versatility the new model Mojo HD will certainly bring more heavy duty downhill versatility. And the slacker HD frame geometry climbs as easily as the standard Mojo set up with a shorter stem and lay back seat position, and frame weight only a little more than 1/2 pound heavier at about 6.5 lb.with air shock.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails But yet another question for Derby.....!-mojofenderssidesmall.jpg  


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