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  1. #1
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    Anyone change from a Nomad to a Mojo?

    I ride xc/trail, and currently have a Nomad built to about 30.5lbs. I really like the way it rides, but I don't use the bike to it's full potential as I don't do any large drops/jumps.

    I'm thinking that perhaps the Mojo may be a better bike for me, and I would also be able to loose quite a bit of weight by changing frames and a few components,

    I was wondering if anyone has gone from riding a Nomad then changed to a Mojo, and if so, what differences they found, and if it was a good change?

    If I kept a 160mm fork on the Mojo, would the head angle/ride be pretty close to the Nomad?

  2. #2
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    I'm just doing the same, my frame is on the way here at present. I'll then build the SL up and compare the ride with the Nomad (mines 31.5lb). Like you I am not using the full potential of the Nomad - my age is against me, so big hucks etc are not a good idea

    The Nomad is a superb ride but I'm sure I can save at least 5lb and still do the same stuff as I'm used to.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple - The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash. "Julie Furtado"

  3. #3
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    I donít have any experience with a Nomad but I know that the Mojo was designed to be very pedaling efficient. To use the Mojo to it full potential, ride it to the top. I have a 08 36 Talas RC2 and at 160mm it feels pretty steep in the front. I only use this setting for descents. 130mm for the flats and tight single track and 100mm for tuff technical climbing. Go ahead and make the change you wont be disappointed. Ibis has the best customer service.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for that guys.

    Cyclelife, if you could post here or PM me with how the SL rides compared to the Nomad when you have it built up that would be really appreciated.

  5. #5
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    Ok I just built my Mojo SL after selling my Nomad. The nomad rocks...The problem was the fork. I rode a pike for 7 months on the nomad but always felt short up front.Then put a Lyrik on it and it was a lot better. But like you guys were saying I never used the the bike and fork to its full form. I felt that it was a lot of bike and fork to climb and get around all day long and sometimes fustrating.I ride 4 days a week on my mountain bike.I live in Colorado and climb an average of 1200 ft a day or more. So being the bike junkie that I'am 5 frames in the past 3 years. I borrowed a friends Mojo and decided it was time for a change. Bought a SL and used most of my parts from my Nomad cause of the $ thing.So unless you got serious coin to spend on new XTR good luck building a 25-26 lb bike. Mine weighs 27.8 lbs. So 3.5 lbs lighter than my Nomad. Yes the Dw link seems to be better than VPP..yes it seems to climb better, it decends very well but the Nomad was better. So it depends what you want.If I had more time I would have checked out the Blue LT2 just to make sure I got the right bike.Don't get me wrong the Mojo rocks as well ...just different. I only have 3 rides on it so I will post more later. Pics are coming ....ride on...Dan
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    Last edited by dancruz; 03-31-2008 at 09:56 PM.
    Just ride and quit bit$hin........
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  6. #6
    www.derbyrims.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancruz
    ... Yes the Dw link seems to be better than VPP..yes it seems to climb better, it decends very well but the Nomad was better. So it depends what you want....Dan
    A Gravity Dropper or AMP remote adjustable hight seat post goes a long way for ease of pointing steep downhill to compensate for the Mojo's quicker steering fork geometry with a 140mm fork.

  7. #7
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    I ride a 27 lb Mojo w/ Talas 32 and a frequent riding buddy rides a 32lb Nomad w/ Talas 36. I think we'd be fairly equal in our abilities if we were on the same bike, so it's interesting to see how we diverge when we ride together on our different bikes.

    As you would guess, I gap him on the climbs, and he gaps with me on the descents. On the slower technical sections like tight uphill switchbacks, I have the edge---but if you throw in some big rocks or roots on the uphill, he can get through it better.

    So it's definitely a tradeoff, but my argument is the Mojo is more comfortable and versatile overall. I like to climb almost as much as I like to descend, and I don't think I'd feel that way if I had a Nomad. When I hit the occasional bike park or downhill-ish rides like Downieville, I'd definitely rather be on the Nomad at those times, but I still have plenty fun on the Mojo, and I just don't do those types of rides more than a few times a year...not frequent enough to justify the additional heft and less efficient rear suspension.

  8. #8
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Quote Originally Posted by getbusyliving
    I ride a 27 lb Mojo w/ Talas 32 and a frequent riding buddy rides a 32lb Nomad w/ Talas 36. I think we'd be fairly equal in our abilities if we were on the same bike, so it's interesting to see how we diverge when we ride together on our different bikes.

    As you would guess, I gap him on the climbs, and he gaps with me on the descents. On the slower technical sections like tight uphill switchbacks, I have the edge---but if you throw in some big rocks or roots on the uphill, he can get through it better.

    So it's definitely a tradeoff, but my argument is the Mojo is more comfortable and versatile overall. I like to climb almost as much as I like to descend, and I don't think I'd feel that way if I had a Nomad. When I hit the occasional bike park or downhill-ish rides like Downieville, I'd definitely rather be on the Nomad at those times, but I still have plenty fun on the Mojo, and I just don't do those types of rides more than a few times a year...not frequent enough to justify the additional heft and less efficient rear suspension.

    I also don't get enough big gravity assisted riding to justify my Nomad, so hopefully when the SL frame lands here (any day now) I'll be able to recoup some money by selling the Nomad or maybe I'll just keep it for "those days" Or just in case I get a problem with the pivot mount

    Nice comparison - getbusyliving but makes me wonder a little whether I've done the right thing, as oless than 3lb difference in weight on your build to my Nomad and not much difference in climbing ability. Anyway I'll try it and find out for myself.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple - The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash. "Julie Furtado"

  9. #9
    boba
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    Nomad v/s Ibis

    I have a 28.8 lb. Ibis with Talas 36 and have ridden my friends' 32.? lb. Nomad with the same fork and same Nevegal 2.3 tires. In my opinion the Ibis climbs better than can be accounted for by the 3lb. weight difference. The Ibis climbs more effortlessly than the Nomad and the riding position is better for both climbing and Xcountry.

    The suspension on both bikes digs in when climbing on rough technical terrain and it would be hard to say which is better unless I spent more time on the Nomad. The Nomad however is better going down...maybe it is the more relaxed head angle, or the cockpit/seatpost or the extra few lbs?

    I would take the Nomad to a bike park, but I see no point in bashing up my Ibis on rocky descents. I will simply rent a pure, downhill rig for the three or four times I am at Mt Washington or Whistler.

    bob, Vancouver Island

  10. #10
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    A friend of mine has the Nomad and I have ridden it. It's much beefier than my Mojo and you can feel it for sure. The Mojo is also far more efficient as others have said. Mojo wins hands down unless you are all about big drops and jumps.

  11. #11
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    I have a Nomad that weighs 32lbs and have a Mojo SL on order. I plan on keeping both but from what I've read on the Mojo the Nomad probably won't get ridden much anymore.

  12. #12
    Ariolimax columbianus
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    I've owned both and when I rode w/a Lyrik coil on my Mojo it descended very similar to the Nomad, the fork was just too heavy for my all around riding purposes. Still waiting for the sub 4.5 lbs adjustable travel 160mm fork.

    Hey dancruz would you mind sharing your height and stem length? Looks like your riding a medium Mojo. I'm 5'10" riding a medium w/a 90mm stem at the moment, started w/a 70mm stem, on the fence between med/large frame size, I like smaller frames for maneuverability (sorry for the thread jack).

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