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  1. #1
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    Any Mojo HD riders have time on a Spitfire

    Posting this the other way on the Banshee forum. Been riding a Spitfire for over 2 years and I love it but my 7" travel bike is now 12 years old and about time to retire and I'm thinking I'd rather have one bike going forward than 2 to maintain so thinking about the Mojo HD 140 and buy the limbo chips plus longer shock for DH adventures (I don't race anymore so it's light DH). Does the Mojo HD 140 climb as well as the Spitfire? Looks to be about the same weight but stiffer.

    BTW, for comparison I like to ride my Spitfire in the Steep setting so the angles are closer to what a Mojo HD would be, don't like the super slack setting.

  2. #2
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    I owned a Spitfire for a season, I loved it because it was slack and low (I rode it in the slack setting) ~66/13.

    I sold it because I had an awesome opportunity to try an HD at no real cost to me.

    If you liked the Spitfire at ~67/13.5, I think you will love the HD. In going back to bearings after bushings, I think it helps the rear wheel hook up and be a little more sensitive when climbing, which is a good thing. I don't notice the difference between the two going down. It could also be a bit of difference between the peddling platforms, but I think both are great. Winner being DW by a small margin.

    Overall for me, I think the Spitfire is faster on the way down (the HD is too steep for me) but the HD is faster on the way up because it is a touch steeper making it a bit more agile and efficient.

    The HD is deff a stiffer and more capable overall package however. You also do have the versatility of running a 160 coil in the rear. Which would be key for any real DH riding.

    It sounds like your idea is a winner. You are keeping the things you like, and improving on a few things (stiffness, climbing ability, versatility). Don't think you will be bummed.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by backcountry1pr View Post
    I owned a Spitfire for a season, I loved it because it was slack and low (I rode it in the slack setting) ~66/13.

    I sold it because I had an awesome opportunity to try an HD at no real cost to me.

    If you liked the Spitfire at ~67/13.5, I think you will love the HD. In going back to bearings after bushings, I think it helps the rear wheel hook up and be a little more sensitive when climbing, which is a good thing. I don't notice the difference between the two going down. It could also be a bit of difference between the peddling platforms, but I think both are great. Winner being DW by a small margin.

    Overall for me, I think the Spitfire is faster on the way down (the HD is too steep for me) but the HD is faster on the way up because it is a touch steeper making it a bit more agile and efficient.

    The HD is deff a stiffer and more capable overall package however. You also do have the versatility of running a 160 coil in the rear. Which would be key for any real DH riding.

    It sounds like your idea is a winner. You are keeping the things you like, and improving on a few things (stiffness, climbing ability, versatility). Don't think you will be bummed.
    Since you rode the Spitty slack I can see your feeling the HD being too steep, do you use an angleset to slacken out the front on the HD? Wouldn't that get the HT angle to be 67.5 on the HD140 which is close to what I have on the Spitty at 67.3?

  4. #4
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    I had a Spitfire for a season and a half. Bushings (and axle) kept wearing out and had a lot of slop. Didn't really effect the riding (at least I think it didn't) but was annoying. It was total opposite from Turner Spot which lasted 2+ years without having to change the bushings.

    As far as riding, low and slack felt good descending but really depended on the tires you were using on it. Climbed okay but nothing like a DWL bike. But then again, it was almost 1/2 the price of a carbon Ibis!

  5. #5
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    HD pedals better & has more anti squat, sits high and stays high in the travel. Spitfire felt more lively

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjosedre View Post
    HD pedals better & has more anti squat, sits high and stays high in the travel. Spitfire felt more lively
    By more lively do you mean it was easier to pop into different lines on the trail? I tend to do that a lot on my Spitty on downhills where a line goes to **** and I hop a foot or two left or right to get back on a good line. I suppose if the bike uses it's suspension better then there's less need to do this but it's kind of my riding style.

  7. #7
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    I didn't think Spitfire was more "lively" vs. other bikes for descents. It was barely okay, with only 127mm of travel. But its geometry made up for some of its issues.

    IMO single pivot (and Horst link) bikes are a lot moar "lively" like Treks, Specialized, Transition, etc. But these don't climb nowhere as well as DW Link (or even VPP) bikes.

  8. #8
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    Yes that is exactly what I mean, same description from a good friend of mine that rode an HD. It took me a few rides to get used to but this but when trying to hop around on the HD the suspension really resists body movement (the anti-squat). For me this was really evident when scooping my feet to hop over things. Not a bad thing but different from the spitty.

    Plus I also use a 1.5 an angled headset (works components) on the HD but it still doesn't have the low slung & slack feeling of the spitfire, the suspension does not squat. Not in corners, steeps, or the rough.

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