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  1. #1
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    About to pull the trigger on new tires....

    I currently run a 2.4 continental mountain king rear and a 2.5 maxxis minion DHF exo front. The mountain king was bald in about three weeks. I love the minion, but at 1250 grams, it is a little on the absurd side. (I generally ride 4+ hour AM loops w/ 3500+ft of climbing near Vail, CO.) I've finally settled on matching 2.3 Specialized Butcher Controls (760g). About to pull the trigger, but...

    Am I getting too weight weenie on these things? I could get the butcher sx, instead. They weigh 950, each and would add quite a bit more weight. Still, there's nothing worse than ripping a hole in your tire!

    Any thoughts/experiences? Please refrain from bringing other tires into the discussion, that'll just confuse me more. (I do wonder how durable the 2.3 minion dhf exo is, though....)

    I'll ride theses tires tubeless on my Ibis Mojo HD 160 w/ stans flow rims.

  2. #2
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    Also considering Maxxis Minion 2.35 exo single ply rear w/ minion 2.35 3c max terra exo front. combined weight 1695g

  3. #3
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    Went from Minion DHF EXO 2.5s to a Spesh Butcher Control fr/ Maxxis Ardent EXO 2.25 rear about a year ago and think the Butcher is a great front tire. Can't help you on how it is as a rear. Would try the Control and if it's not enough swap it for the SX casing. Your weights sound 2 ply. My Minion single plys were closer to 900g.
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  4. #4
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    I loved my Butcher SX 2.3, those tires shred. They are not fast rollers that is for sure, but their soft compound is super grippy, and they have tons of control. The casing is super durable.
    I have not had the best luck with Specialized's control casing tires. I find they get sliced way too easily, and I have burped them if I do not run pressure in the upper arena (ie 38psi). If you are looking for a lighter tire that has great durability, the Maxxis EXO casing Minions, Ardents, HighRoller II are all great in terms of durability and casing strength.
    The tire I am currently in love with for a mid weight option is the Schwalbe Hans Dampf (trailstar). It has nice width, the casing has been super durable, is oddly fast rolling, and is the most numb-skull proof riding tire I've come across. You can practically corner with your eyes closed. It would be my choice given what your after.

  5. #5
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    I'm now leaning towards butcher sx 2.3 rear and butcher 2.3 control front. Seems like a good compromise between weight, durability and cornering prowess. Or maybe I should just get stronger and rock a pair of 2.7 Minion DHFs.... Sounds like fun

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by circlesuponcircles View Post
    I'm now leaning towards butcher sx 2.3 rear and butcher 2.3 control front. Seems like a good compromise between weight, durability and cornering prowess. Or maybe I should just get stronger and rock a pair of 2.7 Minion DHFs.... Sounds like fun
    I would just run the SX front and rear, or the Control front and rear. If you put the control on the front the benefits of the SX casing are going to be minimized, for a relatively minor weight savings. If your set on the Butcher, either go light (control) and ride light, or go heavier (SX) and rail.

  7. #7
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    +1 --"Schwalbe Hans Dampf (trailstar)"
    All that morandi said was right on the money.. Loved that tire.. i since went to 650b so am on pacentti's.. But i miss those hans dampfs..

    4 hour -- 3500ft elevation-- up at elevation-- haha anything you can do to save rotating mass will pay big dividends.. Im so jealous-- id love to ride up there.. Im in santa barbara and we have some good rides here-- but noooot like Colorado ..
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  8. #8
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    I am currently swapping between Butcher SXes and Hans Dampfs. The SXs are great tires -- excellent grip, very predictable, durable casing. The downsides are that they are pretty heavy and have relatively high rolling resistance. I use them for lift assisted riding at Mammoth and use the Hans Dampfs everywhere else. (Morandi's description of the Hans Dampfs is spot on.)

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by slideways666 View Post
    +1 --"Schwalbe Hans Dampf (trailstar)"
    All that morandi said was right on the money.. Loved that tire.. i since went to 650b so am on pacentti's.. But i miss those hans dampfs..
    I think the Hans Dampf on 650b is on its way! Check out this short video about beer and wheels, there is a 650b-HansDampf: bike-channel » Ein Bierchen gefällig?
    (title is like "fancy a beer?")

  10. #10
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    A word or caution about the Hans Dampf. In the Trailstar compound, they get shredded very fast if you ride hard, and/or in rocky conditions. Mine lasted maybe 8 or so rides on my rear tire. I was tearing off sideknobs so fast that the tire was done in a very short period of time. On the front the trailstar lasted quite a bit longer. I have a pacestar that is on the front right now and after a couple of months of riding at 2x/week, is showing almost no wear. It's a great tire.

    I disagree with Morandi about mismatching tires. I do that all the time. I need a tougher tire on the rear. I've been experimenting with lighter tires on the rear and they just tear. I think a SX casing rear and control casing front makes excellent sense.

    Also, re butcher vs. hans dampf. The butcher has longer, more supported side knobs. If you like the corner hard, I would recommend those. The HD is a great all rounder, but I think the butcher is better suited to aggressive riding.
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  11. #11
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    I would give the Butcher controls a try. I can't speak to that specific tire, but i have been running various Specialized tires over the past couple years (Eskar, FastTrak, Captain, Ground Control) in Control versions over some fairly rugged terrain and I've been amazed at how well they hold up in general. And their weights are hard to beat.

    With that much climbing I'd say start lighter with one tire, and if they don't hold up, go more burly. And if they hold up well, maybe even give the Purgatories a shot, they should roll even better.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by slyfink View Post
    I disagree with Morandi about mismatching tires. I do that all the time. I need a tougher tire on the rear. I've been experimenting with lighter tires on the rear and they just tear. I think a SX casing rear and control casing front makes excellent sense.

    Also, re butcher vs. hans dampf. The butcher has longer, more supported side knobs. If you like the corner hard, I would recommend those. The HD is a great all rounder, but I think the butcher is better suited to aggressive riding.
    I have have had front tires blow off or fold over with way more frequency than rears. Usually in corners there is much more pressure on your front tire than on your rear.

  13. #13
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    I have the Butcher 2.5 SX front Purg 2.4 Grid rear on my HD, and the butcher control 2.3 front, eskar 2.3 control rear on my sl (... I know a guy at a specialized dealer), running tubeless on stans flows on all of them.

    Couple of things: My logic was that having the same tread but lighter between the bikes would help me with consistency between hard downhill HD days and long xc SL days. It's not quite that simple...

    The butcher SX cornering knobs are crazy soft. Like chewing gum soft. They are awesome. The SX casing is beefy and awesome.
    The butcher control is not so confidence inspiring. The harder rubber might roll better but it doesn't grip as well, and I've burped it several times.

    I'm also in Colorado and instead of my plan of running my SL with light tires when I'm doing xc, I just pretty much ride my HD all the time. So much for my brilliant plan.

    I respect the weight weenie, but I think it's much easier to go from being a weight weenie to a bomber than it is to go the other way. If you are a bomber, don't go with the control, you'll regret it...

  14. #14
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    i switched from mk 2.4 rear to tk 2.2 rear and it is awesome. the volume is almost identical. i run conti diesel 2.5 front but might give tk2.4 try when it wears out. on my 650b wheels i run pacenti neomotos 2.3 which are great too for colorado front range.
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  15. #15
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    Ended up ordering 2.2 purgatory grid rear and 2.3 butcher control front. I'm gonna start there and see how it goes. Nice thing about tires is that if you don't like 'em you're going to need new ones in a couple of months, anyway....

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