Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    119

    36 160mm in a mojo c

    I know mojo c can take 160 travel cuz I have emailed Ibis and they told me that mojo c is strong enough to handle a 160 fork. My main concern is handling especially uphill. I'm currently running a 1x9 gearing and a 140 travel upfront. I want to have more travel for aggressive dh and have no plans of changing my frame to hd yet. My question is will it make any difference at all if I change my fork to 160? I love going uphills too will this make my setup bad and will just give me a hard time going up? Your inputs guys especially to those who have tried or currently running a A fox 36 with 160 travel on their mojo c. TIA.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    77
    I rode my Mojo C w/a 36 Float 160 for two years. I now have an HD w/that same 36 (a 2008 RC2 model that's been going strong and currently in it's 5th season)

    The good: A much stiffer front end and all the benefits of one (unless you already have a 20mm QR or fat stanchions). Your bikes trail speed limit goes up dramatically. Combine these two, and the bike begs to be ridden faster and more aggressively.

    The bad: It will hinder climbing steep trail. Didn't bother me at all, but if you hop on a friends XC oriented bike, or XC oriented Mojo and climb something steep, it will be much easier to keep the front end planted. It's all about what you want to compromise for. You will raise your BB significantly from a 140mm fork and when cornering this will take some getting used to. Again, I had no problem with it - but did take the time to get my sag exactly right, which keeps the front end from riding unnecessarily high.

    If you do it, do yourself a favor and also get the shortest stem with no rise you can comfortably ride with, and run as few spacers above the headset as you can. Also, wait until you can get a 2013 36 float 160 - Fox has gone back to the RC2 damper - which lets it actually be tuned for aggressive riding (hi&lo compression). IMHO the only reason the RLC damper was put on the 36 was to call it a new "feature" and to get weight down, in a category where those riding could care less about 100g of weight. So essentially the RLC damped 36s became stiff long travel forks that couldn't be tuned as aggressive riding forks... hmmm.
    Evil Undead & a box of trail bike parts waiting for a new frame

  3. #3
    Dropshot Champ!
    Reputation: redmr2_man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4,529
    I didn't like my mojo classic with a fox 160 up front. Was definitely harder to climb steeper pitchs, and just added too much weight to the front end.

    I'd suggest trying to borrow someones for a ride or two. That's what I did, borrowed a 36 for a month. Made me not want to buy one haha.

    Good luck!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    947
    It will change how the bike feels in a big way. I don't even like my HD with a 160 on it. I ride a TALAS 180/140 and run 140 the majority of the time and switch to 180 only on aggressive downhills. I swapped to my 160 Float to save weight and use the lock out....hated the geometry for general riding and climbing! Went back to my heavier 180 and it is way better in 140 mode.

    How about a 160/120 TALAS?

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    119
    I'm currently using a talas 32 100-120-140 and never really like it. I have tried a float 36 rc2 but on a different bike and it feels really plush and I really like how it rides. I like flowing trails and I don't ride xc a lot so I guess I can give 160 float rc2 a try. If I will not like it I might ask my local bike shop to just reduce the travel to 150. Thanks anyway, guys.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •