Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 47
  1. #1
    Craiger951
    Reputation: craiger951's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    9

    Asta Comp X7 vs. Ignition Super Pro

    I've been riding a hard tail for a while and want to upgrade to FS. I am likely to purchase an Ibex after the '09 models are available. I'm trying to decide between an Asta Comp X7 and an Ignition Super Pro. Besides the difference in the components, what are the riding differences? Which will fit my riding better?

    I suppose my riding style is XC. I ride in Southern California, a lot of climbing and single track descents. I don't jump or downhill. I am just looking for a faster better handling and more comfortable ride for my 42 year old body.

    Thanks for your thoughts.

    Craiger

  2. #2
    Cuánto pesa?
    Reputation: Jake Pay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    7,880
    Quote Originally Posted by craiger951
    I've been riding a hard tail for a while and want to upgrade to FS. I am likely to purchase an Ibex after the '09 models are available. I'm trying to decide between an Asta Comp X7 and an Ignition Super Pro. Besides the difference in the components, what are the riding differences? Which will fit my riding better?

    I suppose my riding style is XC. I ride in Southern California, a lot of climbing and single track descents. I don't jump or downhill. I am just looking for a faster better handling and more comfortable ride for my 42 year old body.

    Thanks for your thoughts.

    Craiger
    Welcome to the FORUMz

    ASTA is a 4" travel XC design..Great climber and FAST..Also can handle some of the rougher stuff...

    IGGY is a 5" travel AM design..Takes the mid/big bumps and grinds like a champ but not the best in tha climbing department..

    My nickle
    ~Jake

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RichS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    169
    I have an '08 Iggy super and love it. I ride mostly XC because those are the trails I have access to and it does fine. I like the more upright riding position of an AM bike (I have back and shoulder issues).

    Some pics of the '08



    Some of the trails I hit.




    That rock was pretty big. My friend hit it and went OTB and decided to walk. I told him to get out of the way and just let the suspension soak the rock up and rolled right over it. I know I could have gone around it but him calling me an a$$ as I rode by him was well worth it.

    Rich S.

  4. #4
    {Believeland}
    Reputation: XCkiller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    277
    i concur with jake, the asta is way more Xcountryish compared to the allmountainish igniton, if your going to be jumping and dropping anything more than 3 feet then the iggy is the bike for you, but it sounds like your going to be sticking to fast single tracks, in which case you would probabley prefer the lighter and more agile asta instead of the igniton
    ride fast.... live slow

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    51

    another vote for the Asta

    I also rode a hardtail until this past year. I cared more about the climbing ability and didn't jump or drop off too much. The terrain in my area of PA is very rocky and I wanted something to soak up the bumps. The Asta was a great choice for me. THe riding position is more relaxed then my, more racer, hardtail. It is a confidence inspiring ride that has inspired me to take on more challenging terrain at much greater speeds then I would have on the hardtail. It has taken everything I have thrown at it, and it climbs great.
    A poor man can only afford the best.

  6. #6
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,589
    Asta is better suited for your XC needs and will handle the rough with ease.
    Formotion Products
    http://www.formot

  7. #7
    Craiger951
    Reputation: craiger951's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by murphy0421
    I also rode a hardtail until this past year. I cared more about the climbing ability and didn't jump or drop off too much. The terrain in my area of PA is very rocky and I wanted something to soak up the bumps. The Asta was a great choice for me. THe riding position is more relaxed then my, more racer, hardtail. It is a confidence inspiring ride that has inspired me to take on more challenging terrain at much greater speeds then I would have on the hardtail. It has taken everything I have thrown at it, and it climbs great.
    Thanks Murph,

    Which Asta do you have? What size? Can you give me the weight?

    I find it interesting that most of the riders on my trails ride AM bikes. However, I never see any of them jumping anything. Could I be missing something or are they?

    Thanks all for the support,

    Craiger

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    9,647
    Quote Originally Posted by craiger951
    Thanks Murph,

    Which Asta do you have? What size? Can you give me the weight?

    I find it interesting that most of the riders on my trails ride AM bikes. However, I never see any of them jumping anything. Could I be missing something or are they?

    Thanks all for the support,

    Craiger
    I feel the same exact way. Everyone around me seems to ride bikes in the standard 5-6" trail bike range or bigger. Sure, we have some nasty rough sections, but almost nothing in the way of jumps or drops over 1 to 2 ft.

    I think the biggest reason people do this is the slack angles and relaxed position of the bigger bikes. It does give you more confidence. I think they also tend to buy bikes around those handful of tricky spots that they want to do better on, or the trails they think they will ride, and end up riding a bike that is too big for 95% of what they do. But, that is a gross generalization and I don't think everyone does that

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    467
    Quote Originally Posted by craiger951
    I find it interesting that most of the riders on my trails ride AM bikes. However, I never see any of them jumping anything. Could I be missing something or are they?
    Your idea of XC could be another rider's idea of AM. It's an interesting dynamic. It also could be that you prefer to pick a cleaner line than they do. Not enough data, but the HT kinda gives you away.

    Talk to the folks who share your trail and ask how their bikes climb, decend, pedal, etc.. Would they change anything about their choice in bikes, suspension travel, etc? I haven't met a single rider who didn't like to talk about their bike--good or bad.

    My personal experience is that no matter where you go, people have a different understanding of what they want versus what they need. I would rather have more than enough than not enough at all, but that's just me.

  10. #10
    mighty sailin' man
    Reputation: MiniTrail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    4,696
    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    I think the biggest reason people do this is the slack angles and relaxed position of the bigger bikes. It does give you more confidence. I think they also tend to buy bikes around those handful of tricky spots that they want to do better on, or the trails they think they will ride, and end up riding a bike that is too big for 95% of what they do. But, that is a gross generalization and I don't think everyone does that
    Hey!
    I resemble that statement!

  11. #11
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,589
    My son on the Asta 3 years ago, I dont recommend this though.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Formotion Products
    http://www.formot

  12. #12
    Craiger951
    Reputation: craiger951's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    My son on the Asta 3 years ago, I dont recommend this though.
    If the Asta can handle action like that photo even occasionally, it will withstand anything I can throw at it.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    51
    Quote Originally Posted by craiger951
    Thanks Murph,

    Which Asta do you have? What size? Can you give me the weight?

    I find it interesting that most of the riders on my trails ride AM bikes. However, I never see any of them jumping anything. Could I be missing something or are they?

    Thanks all for the support,

    Craiger
    I have an Asta Pro medium frame size. I don't get into the whole weight thing too much. I try to but the lightest weight parts in my price range, but I don't go out and replace things just to save weight. I never got an exact weight on it. I can tell you that it doesn't feel heavy when you are riding it, and it climbs great. Overall, I am very happy with the purchase, and am kicking myself for not doing it sooner. It is so much more fun to ride than my hardtail!
    John
    A poor man can only afford the best.

  14. #14
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,589
    Quote Originally Posted by craiger951
    If the Asta can handle action like that photo even occasionally, it will withstand anything I can throw at it.
    The poor Asta had no clue what it was in for since XC has been a weak strength of mine so it was built as a AM bike with spares. It's duties ended up being AM/FR and mild DH, the first generation Asta was over built so the '07's on were redesigned to be better fit it's intended XC niche. What we put the Asta through I do not recommend unless your like me and what ever happens happens, I wasnt worried about warranty because we were using it beyond it's intended design and I'm sure Jack was cringing everytime crazy pics were posted. The Asta went through almost 2 years of abuse and is now living life as a trail bike doing weekend duties with a new owner.
    Formotion Products
    http://www.formot

  15. #15
    banned
    Reputation: Jerk_Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    16,480
    Quote Originally Posted by craiger951
    Thanks Murph,

    Which Asta do you have? What size? Can you give me the weight?

    I find it interesting that most of the riders on my trails ride AM bikes. However, I never see any of them jumping anything. Could I be missing something or are they?

    Thanks all for the support,

    Craiger
    It's not always about jumping. There are people that don't get much air, but the terrain and tech features they ride will greatly reduce the life of many frames in a short amount of time. Then there's also such things as the axle path and leverage ratio that makes a difference on how something will handle a certain trail.

    In my case, I'm not big on air, but I ride extremely rocky, rough trails, with high speeds and roller drops. A 5 Spot would likely have been decent, although I needed a slacker head angle to help against getting stopped up on obstacles on the flat trails, along with helping out on technical descents and drops. The initial part of rear travel is slightly falling in rate and that helps with the rock crawling, then the leverage ramps at the end to prevent bottoming. I had to research closely into this. I could have done it on the 5 Spot, but the fact is I would have had a severely limited life, trading off a lot of fun for a mildly lighter frame, compared to my RFX. Pics in my gallery and examples outside of it in assorted threads.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueEyes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    204
    My stock medium Asta Pro with pedals is 29lbs.

    My big advice is to rent or try out as many bikes as you can. What trails you ride is pretty important, but what geometry you like to ride is a huge piece of the puzzle. You won't know that until you have applied your butt to most everything out there.

    Maybe someone who has an IGGY can add, but the Asta geometry is pretty comperable (IMO) to riding a SC Blur XC, Epic, Yeti ASR. Maybe the Iggy is better compared to the Fuel, Stumpjumper?

  17. #17
    banned
    Reputation: Jerk_Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    16,480
    It's also not all about the geometry exclusively. Lots of companies try to copy winning geometry numbers that simply don't work in the real world, due to different leverage curves, for instance.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueEyes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    204
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    It's also not all about the geometry exclusively. Lots of companies try to copy winning geometry numbers that simply don't work in the real world, due to different leverage curves, for instance.

    Not following you.

  19. #19
    banned
    Reputation: Jerk_Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    16,480
    Lots of companies with different bikes think they can use the geometry from company A with best selling frame X. In reality, the geometry of the entire frame can't necessarily be applied to another bike with a completely different suspension or different leverage curve and a host of other changes. Bikes sit differently with sag, have different shocks, settle differently into travel, rider balance impacting suspension, different forks, etc. The geo and linkage should be designed together

    That's why one can't only rely on the static geometry when the bike is sitting in a shop window or in your garage.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueEyes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    204
    Okay. Gotcha. So what is the OP to do?

    Part of the disconnect, is that when I say geometry I mean: bike class (XC), body position (real geometry, sag, etc) and feel (ride, response), not just the numbers. These are the things that are so difficult to advise others on. Will this bike work for these trails? Well, yeah.... but will you love it? It is the KIND of bike you want or feel most comfortable on?
    We are in agreement, but I think it is even more important for those of us that have IBEXes to know what bikes at LBS's are comperable (in class, fit and feel). For those that are seriously considering buying direct, usually the wrenching and LBS service components are not as important, so that means that the one major obstacle to overcome is fit.
    The last thing I would want is to have someone buy an IBEX and say the thing is a POS because it wasn't the geomentry they wanted, needed, expected. In order to combat that, they need to know what they can ride that will give them an approximation of fit. DYKWIM?

  21. #21
    banned
    Reputation: Jerk_Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    16,480
    Any reason you capitalize the letters in the brand name? I guess you don't know the origins of why others here do that, do you?

    And I "DKWYM", but at the same time you are being completely foolish in assuming you can approximate a comparison with brand X in an effort to put ibex on a podium. There are too many factors to decide on, and I wholly challenge the notion that the posters on this forum have experience with many bike shop brands to be able to offer advice. Hell, most of the posts here don't address the actual technical things that decide the ride, nor can proper evaluations be provided that allow some degree of comparability with other brands. Usually, we just have the "psick" and "awesome" reviews, but little one can compare outside of subjectiveness.

  22. #22
    Just ride
    Reputation: skim1040's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,049
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    Any reason you capitalize the letters in the brand name? I guess you don't know the origins of why others here do that, do you?

    And I "DKWYM", but at the same time you are being completely foolish in assuming you can approximate a comparison with brand X in an effort to put ibex on a podium. There are too many factors to decide on, and I wholly challenge the notion that the posters on this forum have experience with many bike shop brands to be able to offer advice. Hell, most of the posts here don't address the actual technical things that decide the ride, nor can proper evaluations be provided that allow some degree of comparability with other brands. Usually, we just have the "psick" and "awesome" reviews, but little one can compare outside of subjectiveness.
    Name some of the top posters in the Ibex section that don't have experience on other bikes please.
    You know what sucks worse than training? Losing.
    You know what sucks worse than losing? Nothing.

    Ride on

  23. #23
    banned
    Reputation: Jerk_Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    16,480
    Read my wording more carefully and find the word: "many" in there, not "ALL".

  24. #24
    mighty sailin' man
    Reputation: MiniTrail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    4,696
    JC

    Sorry but I think you tend to get a little carried away at times. I appreciate your contributions but you can't seem to stop at that.

    Perhaps we should all just have you right the reviews for us. Seems that's what it would take to make you happy. Good luck with your crusade.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    9,647
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    Any reason you capitalize the letters in the brand name? I guess you don't know the origins of why others here do that, do you?

    And I "DKWYM", but at the same time you are being completely foolish in assuming you can approximate a comparison with brand X in an effort to put ibex on a podium. There are too many factors to decide on, and I wholly challenge the notion that the posters on this forum have experience with many bike shop brands to be able to offer advice. Hell, most of the posts here don't address the actual technical things that decide the ride, nor can proper evaluations be provided that allow some degree of comparability with other brands. Usually, we just have the "psick" and "awesome" reviews, but little one can compare outside of subjectiveness.
    There is truth in what you say.

    ...But do you see anything else in the other boards here with discussions on leverage ratios and linkage sizes and so on? I don't think the Ibex board is much different than most other manufacturers forums here, except maybe with a bit more enthusiasm at times. Go ask about a Hifi or a Fuel, and you will get the same kind of responses: "it rides awesome" and "best bike evar" except with an occasional mention of ABP thrown in for good measure. If you ask specific questions about these bike I don't doubt this forum's ability to provide specific answers, but the context of this thread is an OP without FS experience asking about the big picture difference between two specific Ibex models

    The exceptions to this are of course boards like Turner, Ellsworth and Titus; the kind of bikes that people buy when they know exactly what they want and want to discuss the engineering details. I would too if I was going to invest in a bike like that.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •