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  1. #1
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    Sonix LT, hard on uphills.

    Well, I've been feeling this for some time and now I decided to ask here. Everytime I get to climb a somewhat long uphill I feel like I'm producing enough force to interfere with earth rotation speed. First I blamed the tires, I use a pair of Nevegals 2.1. Then I turned to the bike's geometry. The seat tube on the Sonix tends to throw me to the back, putting all my weight on the rear tire. Put the shock into the equation too but it barely moves when I'm climbing.

    I look at my friends while climbing and it really looks like I have to make twice the effort for the same task.

    The bike is awesome when going down, great grip and manoeuvrability, nothing to complain in this department. The way up is the problem.

    Any insights?
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hamud
    Well, I've been feeling this for some time and now I decided to ask here. Everytime I get to climb a somewhat long uphill I feel like I'm producing enough force to interfere with earth rotation speed. First I blamed the tires, I use a pair of Nevegals 2.1. Then I turned to the bike's geometry. The seat tube on the Sonix tends to throw me to the back, putting all my weight on the rear tire. Put the shock into the equation too but it barely moves when I'm climbing.

    I look at my friends while climbing and it really looks like I have to make twice the effort for the same task.

    The bike is awesome when going down, great grip and manoeuvrability, nothing to complain in this department. The way up is the problem.

    Any insights?

    Hmmm looks like you need to setup your sonixLT. There are a few discussions here that will guide you. First I would suggest to follow the 10mm sag rule AND OPEN UP YOUR REBOUND. Next try to get a "bike fit" from your LBS it does help

    From experience there is a big difference in setting up the bike. Experiment and have fun

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ErnieL
    Hmmm looks like you need to setup your sonixLT. There are a few discussions here that will guide you. First I would suggest to follow the 10mm sag rule AND OPEN UP YOUR REBOUND. Next try to get a "bike fit" from your LBS it does help

    From experience there is a big difference in setting up the bike. Experiment and have fun

    SAG is ok, gonna measure again just in case, will remember your hint 'bout the rebound. Didn't get a real bike fit, but some virtual ones, seemed ok, gonna get them again too and get a real one with the bike.

    Thx dude.
    Last edited by Hamud; 02-18-2010 at 06:56 PM.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hamud
    SAG is ok, gonna measure again just in case, will remember your hint 'bout the rebound. Didn't get a real bike fit, but some virtual ones, seamed ok, gonna get them again too and get a real one with the bike.

    Thx dude.

    Yes pay attention to the rebound on your next ride. TOO much rebound will make the rear suspension sink pass the sag.

    Try first full open then slowly dial it in to your liking.

    Tuning is a bit boring so bring a friend I recommend finding a nice easy uphill and or downhill and go back and forth on the same track until you are satisfied

  5. #5
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    Rebound has nothing to do with sagging the rear suspension. The rebound controls the "rebounding" speed of the shock. I.E. how fast the shock extends back out. You air pressure adjusts your sag. If it's too squishy then you can start adjusting your compression to your liking.

  6. #6
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    don't want to argue. but i does. If rebound set too high then the suspension will sink (but not all the way) as it does not have enough time to come back until the next bump hits.

    Also if considering he has the SonixLT he must have the MC3.3 rear shocks. Unfortunately (or maybe mine is not working properly) rebound adjust in this shocks affects the resistance of the shocks in both directions. --- setting the rebound at max will make the rear suspension hard and the user may think it has too much air. he will then reduce the air and wham! the suspension sinks on the first hard hit or on uphill

  7. #7
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    Got it. I'm using the monarch 4.2 and with max rebound it still compresses fine it just rebounds slowly.

  8. #8
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    Mine has the MC 3.3 indeed.
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  9. #9
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    Good you have the monarch already. I'm trying to buy/order the MONARCH4.2 DUALAIR on via our local RS distributor but it seems they don't like to sell their own product. Its so hard to buy Rockshox here.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hamud
    Mine has the MC 3.3 indeed.
    Upgrade your shocks next if you have the spare change. That is what i am trying to do now. (covertly of coarse- don't want my wife to find out and ruin my plans hehehe)

  11. #11
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    I just realized the rebound on my MC3.3 acts in both directions indeed.

    We did 50km today with a lot of uphills, it was really a pain, had to put too much effort. Will try a different tire on the back.

    If I need to change the shock I would too have to conceal from my girl, hheheehhehehe.
    Last edited by Hamud; 02-21-2010 at 12:11 PM.
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  12. #12
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    Have you tried lifting up off the saddle a bit? Don't stand completely up--just shift forward and come off the nose of the saddle slightly. This suspension design stiffens up when you're off the saddle so this should keep it from sinking into it's travel so much, and by shifting forward you'll weight the front end a bit which can only help it stay planted and tracking straight...

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveF
    Have you tried lifting up off the saddle a bit? Don't stand completely up--just shift forward and come off the nose of the saddle slightly. This suspension design stiffens up when you're off the saddle so this should keep it from sinking into it's travel so much, and by shifting forward you'll weight the front end a bit which can only help it stay planted and tracking straight...
    I know that would be the best way to face the uphills, it's just that I have a back pain problem and everytime I lean too much forward it really hurts.

    Anyway, I've really noticed that the seat tube on the Sonix is a bit more leaned backwards than the average 120mm trail bike. Just compared with my friend's Novara System Pro and the difference was noticeable.
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  14. #14
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    Ah, sorry to hear about your back issues.

    The Haro website indicates that you should go with the larger size if you are between sizes on their bikes with interrupted seat tubes. The seat tube does angle back considerably, as you've noticed, so raising the seat post toward it's maximum extension moves the saddle farther back than on most bikes and lengthens the virtual top tube as well.

    Do you have a lot of stand-over clearance and a lot of seat post showing? If so, perhaps a larger size frame would help. Not the most cost effective solution of course!

    I'd have a hard time picking a size for myself--I usually ride a 16" frame but would consider moving up to an 18" due to this design quirk. I'd have to try them both and see.

  15. #15
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    Well, I'm 6'2" with 33,86" of inseam. The seat post is 400mm and has more than 300mm out of the seat tube.

    The back issue is, in part, my fault, never went to the doctor to get it checked...
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  16. #16
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    You're tall! If they make a bigger size than you currently ride, you should try one and see if it's better. With over 300mm of seat post showing you should be able to ride the next size up I'd think.

  17. #17
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    OMG! My SonixLT rocks!

    I recently ungraded my rear shocks to a FOX High Volume RP23 with BOOSTVALVE. The suspension became alive. It feels very plush and feels bottomless on hard use and the best part the sagging on severe uphill is almost non existent even on full open. Switch to propedal and it feeds solid but still accepts bumps.

    The RS MC3.3 doesn't do justice on the sonix. Upgrade NOW and you will not regret it
    Last edited by ErnieL; 03-25-2010 at 05:51 AM.

  18. #18
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    A new shock might be cheaper than a new frame...

    ...I also thought you might be able to just move your seat further forward--maybe pick up a zero setback post? That might help and would be a cheap fix...

  19. #19
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    That's great to hear. Just curious as to why you went with HV over low?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jumper780
    That's great to hear. Just curious as to why you went with HV over low?
    I noticed that I am not using the last 20% travel of my Sonix even if I ride hard on a LV (low volume) shocks. It feels very springy at the end of the travel. I can correct it by lowering the pressure but the sag is around 30mm - NOT GOOD.

    HV shocks have a lower rate on progressiveness thus I can use more travel of my suspension. I can set the sag to 10mm and still be able to use 95% travel on my rides

    Oh HV shocks does not work on all frames. Some frame design rely on the high rate of sock progressiveness to work right

  21. #21
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    Hmm, I guess it depends on the type of riding. I use all my travel on my rides, but I do ride aggressively, and thats with 50% compression.

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