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  1. #1
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    This happen on anybody else's Sonix?

    My big chain ring is a little out of whack and it is cutting into the chain stay. I never use my big ring and the only purpose I have for it is to help dig into logs or rocks when I'm climbing. My previous Stumpy's chain ring was seriously out of whack from all of the hits it took but it never came close to rubbing on anything. When Haro was designing this, did they not think these things were going to take some abuse? I know I can get out my pliers and get those teeth straight but it sure seems poorly designed. IS there something I can do to get more space in there?
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  2. #2
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    I was concerned about this when I was buiding up the frame. There was no way that I was going with an external bottom bracket when I had my trusty Race Face DH crank ready to go on ISIS. So I picked up a 68, 118 truvative spindle (contrary to what was recommended by Haro - they were friendly but unresponsive and seemed to have no idea of what was the appropriate length for a conventional spindle) . The 118 has given me about 4 mm of clearance from the frame and a couple of minor nicks from rocks I've picked up between the frame and chain ring. I'm with you furry, time to dump that big ring for a bash gaurd.

  3. #3
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    I wouldn't think that I should have to get a new bottom bracket just to accommodate this poor design. Until I get a new one I suppose I will just have to keep an eye on the teeth and straighten them out as they continue to get mangled by rocks and logs.

    Cracker69 mentioned something about a bash guard, can the big ring be replaced by something that doesn't have teeth and is simply there to absorb rock and log hits?

  4. #4
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    Is it the stock crankset that is doing this?
    "It is the glory of God to conceal a matter; to search out a matter is the glory of kings."

  5. #5
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    Yep. All stock equipment. I haven't changed or added anything. (Except for bar ends.)

  6. #6
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    Hey Furry,
    You should be able to pick a variety of after market bashguards - might even drop some weight, you will certainly gain clearance.

    check out
    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...+Bashring.aspx
    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...Rockguard.aspx

    These two should fit without issue particularly the second one- but check with the manufacturer to be certain.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cracker69
    Hey Furry,
    You should be able to pick a variety of after market bashguards - might even drop some weight, you will certainly gain clearance.

    check out
    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...+Bashring.aspx
    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...Rockguard.aspx

    These two should fit without issue particularly the second one- but check with the manufacturer to be certain.
    Cracker. Thanks for the link. I think that is the way to go. I don't think I'll be sacrificing too much by giving up the big ring.

    If the manufacturer's rep is reading this I would like to know what their thoughts are on a fix for this way too tight clearance.

  8. #8
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    I have the Same bike, with the stock cranks. I figured this would be a problem. Haro spec'd this bike with WAY TOO Little clearance on the big ring. Luckily while build the bike I noticed this and have been VERY aware while riding. I don't hit logs with my big ring, so I'm not too worried about it. I've been thinking about reaplcing with a bash guard too, but the flat trails herein Florida would have me for that. I don't think we'll be able to run a true 2x9 Set up on these bikes. I got mine at a super sweet deal so I can't complain too much.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cracked Headtube
    I have the Same bike, with the stock cranks. I figured this would be a problem. Haro spec'd this bike with WAY TOO Little clearance on the big ring. Luckily while build the bike I noticed this and have been VERY aware while riding. I don't hit logs with my big ring, so I'm not too worried about it. I've been thinking about reaplcing with a bash guard too, but the flat trails herein Florida would have me for that. I don't think we'll be able to run a true 2x9 Set up on these bikes. I got mine at a super sweet deal so I can't complain too much.
    Why don't you think we'll be able to run a 2x9?

    Unfortunately in Colorado I can't avoid hitting rock and log obstacles. There are a lot of stair step type rock climbs and I inevitably smash the ring on these climbs. I'll have to find out if we can use one of these bash guards.
    Last edited by Furrydogs; 06-18-2007 at 05:40 AM.

  10. #10
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    i'm more than a little curious about the chainring clearance on the driveside too. i have a sonix s (with lx cranks) and, while the big ring doesn't touch the frame, it's really close and even a minor knock on the ring would likely initiate rubbing // grinding.

    initially, i thought it was assembled with a spacer missing but if all of the sonix have the same setup... ditching the big ring isn't an option for me.
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  11. #11
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    OK, time for me to chime in. First of all, your outer ring isn't designed for helping you dig into logs and roots. It's an alloy ring that will bend when subject to this type of riding. Ask any shore rider and they'll tell you the same thing.

    Like others have suggested, if this is the type of riding you plan to do, you really need a bash ring. Yes, you can run one. You just can't run a chainguide on this bike.

    Yes, the clearance is tight. But I'll defend our design by stating that this is a completely seperate issue. It would sort of be the equivalent of bending your wheel after taking a drop and then blaming the fork manufacturer for not providing enough clearance. In both cases, equipment needs to be used for the purpose for which it's intended. When you ride outside of those parameters, you either need to make some changes to your equipment or accept what happens to it if you don't.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by downhilljill
    Yes, the clearance is tight. But I'll defend our design by stating that this is a completely seperate issue.
    thanks jill. i'm not concerned about the clearance if the bike was designed that way but since i haven't seen any other sonix models up here in canada, i didn't have anything to compare it to.

    my sonix s really rips and although it's taken a while to get used to -- i have a giant trance too -- i've been impressed with almost everything so far. most of my criticisms come down to personal preference on the parts spec but, all in all, a solid xc // lighter-duty trail bike.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by downhilljill
    Yes, the clearance is tight. But I'll defend our design by stating that this is a completely seperate issue. It would sort of be the equivalent of bending your wheel after taking a drop and then blaming the fork manufacturer for not providing enough clearance. In both cases, equipment needs to be used for the purpose for which it's intended. When you ride outside of those parameters, you either need to make some changes to your equipment or accept what happens to it if you don't.
    Jill, Thank you for the reply and your input. But I respectfully disagree. I think the Sonix is billed as a cross country bike which is why I bought it. I ride the singletrack trails of the Denver area which has a variety of terrain. Some of this terrain includes uphill and downhill with water bars, rock steps and logs. With this in mind I guess I need to know which bike would satisfy these "parameters"?. My previous bike was a Stumpjumper hardtail which I rode in the same manner for the last 5 years. I accepted that my outer chain ring was mangled but it still managed to work and did not ever prevent me from riding any trails. I've ridden the Sonix for a month and half and I'm eating a hole through the chain stay! Also, I don't think you're analogy works. There are certain things I expect from a cross country bike and one of them is that it can handle normal, singletrack, mountain riding from an intermediate rider. And I would argue that "normal" riding includes attempting foot and half water bars and rock steps. Yes, if I was bombing down Keystone and taking 5 foot drops then I would be riding outside the "parameters" of the bike.

    My main point of posting these pictures was to get feedback from other riders that might have a solution for what I consider a problem. I did not realize I was riding outside the scope of what the Sonix was built for so I guess I either misjudged my riding style or bought the wrong bike.

    Anyway, I guess it's not a big deal. It took me about 2 minutes to bend the teeth back so now I have enough clearance for my ride tomorrow. Thanks for listening and your feedback.

  14. #14
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    huh?

    Quote Originally Posted by Furrydogs
    Anyway, I guess it's not a big deal. It took me about 2 minutes to bend the teeth back so now I have enough clearance for my ride tomorrow. Thanks for listening and your feedback.
    Soo,
    not to be an arse, but you are respectfully disagreeing b/c you had to BEND THE TEETH BACK on your chainring in order to ride your bike??

    I'm pretty sure you are what any bike mfgr would consider 'outside of the scope' of intended use.Hell, I don't think anyone I know would actually continue riding their bike w/ teeth bent on the sprocket!

    I know you were just posting to see what others have encountered, but c'mon man. Take care of your rig!
    John
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  15. #15
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    That's OK, you are certainly entitiled to disagree and have an opinion. No offense taken.

    Let's back up just a little bit here; this really has nothing to do with the type of bike you are on. The Sonix is perfectly suitable for the type of riding you do. However, alloy chainrings are not designed to be used for helping you "dig" into logs and rocks. That's what a bash ring is for. The typical rider who rides XC trails isn't using their big rig for this purpose. You are using the big ring for a purpose for which it was not intended for.

    My question for you is if you use your big ring for this purpose, and you never use it as a gear, why would you not want a bash ring? It's stronger, lighter, and will give you more clearance. And even if the chainstays accomodated a bent ring, why would you want to ride a bent big ring for any length of time?

    Check eBay for bash rings...you can usually pick them up really cheap there.

    Ultimately, I truly want you to be happy with your Sonix. I know you were trying to decide between the Sonix and another bike, so it's important to me that you feel good about the bike you are on.

  16. #16
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    truvativ stylo gxp gives a tiny bit more clearance than the stock cranks on the base model. Incidentally, so does an XT front drlr over the deore (to the tire).

    but if you want to be able to bash over logs and rocks, get the bashguard. they are quite popular in here in Flag, AZ. I would rather stop when I come to a log crossing on an unknown trail and check the clearance of the ever popular "build-ups" on either side than give up my big ring. but I am well past the point of being ashamed about putting a foot down and slowing down to check a trail obstacle. I am personally looking at a guard for a three ring setup. have to do more research. all that I know for sure is that they are not as strong a "true" bashguard.

    hope that is some of the rider feedback that you are looking for.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biker75
    Soo,
    not to be an arse, but you are respectfully disagreeing b/c you had to BEND THE TEETH BACK on your chainring in order to ride your bike??

    I'm pretty sure you are what any bike mfgr would consider 'outside of the scope' of intended use.Hell, I don't think anyone I know would actually continue riding their bike w/ teeth bent on the sprocket!

    I know you were just posting to see what others have encountered, but c'mon man. Take care of your rig!
    John
    No offense taken. I'm not sure how you ride your bike or where you ride, but I usually don't use the outer chain ring on the rides around here. Since I didn't use the outer chain ring I didn't notice any chain slippage, etc that would be evident with a bent sprocket. I didn't notice the teeth scraping the frame until I was CLEANING (this was capitalized to emphasize that I take care of my bike) my bike after the ride. I'm not sure if you could tell by the picture I posted, but the teeth really didn't bend that much, and that slight amount was enough to dig into the frame.

    I don't usually carry a pliers or leatherman with me on rides but I guess your implying that I should carry something like this in the future to deal with a bent sprocket? (I'm being serious here, should a pliers be part of a mobile repair kit? I just have an Alien tool with me when I ride)

    I don't think I'm being unreasonable with this gripe but I guess a few of you disagree.

  18. #18
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    b.ray and downhill,
    Yeah. That is the type of feedback I am looking for. Up until a few days ago I didn't know there was such thing as a bash guard so I am slowly figuring this out and trying to decide what to do. I am rarely on the road with this bike and the only time I can remember using my big chain ring was at the end of Porcupine Rim in Moab where the last 5 or so miles is on the highway back into town. I guess i need to decide if having that big ring 1% of the time is worth it. And here I thought everybody's outer ring was just an accessory.

    One other thing, can somebody guide me on what's involved with installing one of these bash guards? Is it as simple as removing the outer ring and adding the bash guard or do I have to adjust my derailleur, etc?

  19. #19
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    Furry,
    Bash gaurd installation is very simple. The guards are generally a little thicker than the chain ring they replace and come with longer chain ring nuts and bolts that will replace the ones you currently have. The diameter (if you get the correct size) will be slightly smaller than your outer ring so you shouldn't need to muck around with your front derailleur. The old ring and the new gaurd should both easily manuover over your crank arm so your really just taking of four bolts and the ring and replacing with the bash guard and the new bolts.

    BTW b.ray if you want a three ring bash guard I have one that you can have for the cost of shipping.....
    No conventional wisdom, just current wisdom. Reinvented knowledge that is seldom relevant as the variable landscape is vast.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cracker69
    Furry,
    Bash gaurd installation is very simple. The guards are generally a little thicker than the chain ring they replace and come with longer chain ring nuts and bolts that will replace the ones you currently have. The diameter (if you get the correct size) will be slightly smaller than your outer ring so you shouldn't need to muck around with your front derailleur. The old ring and the new gaurd should both easily manuover over your crank arm so your really just taking of four bolts and the ring and replacing with the bash guard and the new bolts..
    Cracker, thanks for the guidance. I don't even think I could screw that up.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cracker69

    BTW b.ray if you want a three ring bash guard I have one that you can have for the cost of shipping.....
    thanks for the offer cracker. but I work in a shop. save it for someone that doesn't have a hookup. I am more interested to hear why you are not running it, and how you liked it when you did run it. I am not really sure if I want to run one. just kicking around the idea

  22. #22
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    b.ray
    The reason I'm not running the three-ring guard is a bit silly actually. It came down to aesthetics. That guard is a big sucker and it looks like your cranking around with great dinner plate on your spindle. I just couldn't get with the appearance of it. I have no complaints about the way it worked though. I quite like the compact look of the two-ring guard and I basically never use my big ring so that seemed to seal it. I'm always a little surprised when I come across an obvious example of vanity transfer to the bike - thought I was above all that nonsense......
    No conventional wisdom, just current wisdom. Reinvented knowledge that is seldom relevant as the variable landscape is vast.

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