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Thread: Cush core?

  1. #1
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    Cush core?

    Anyone here running Cush Core on their GG? Curious about it for both DH and trail, and I wanted to get some thoughts from everyone here.

    I know there's a huuuuge thread on it elsewhere on MTBR, but I'm curious since a lot of folks here ride the rough pretty hard or ride with extra heavy casing to prevent flats.
    Last edited by stripes; 02-26-2018 at 11:41 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by stripes View Post
    Anyone here running Crush Core on their GG? Curious about it for both DH and trail, and I wanted to get some thoughts from everyone here.

    I know there's a huuuuge thread on it elsewhere on MTBR, but I'm curious since a lot of folks here ride the rough pretty hard or ride with extra heavy casing to prevent flats.
    I have looked at them and I'm curious about them as well.

    Personally, I'm not sure they fit with my riding Style. I also only weigh a 138lbs. For my size, I think tire pressure is more important.

    It will be interesting to see the feedback from others.

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    I think you mean cushcore?

    It's a game changer if you ride hard enough to require it. Are you tearing tires and/or hitting your rim at 30psi in the back routinely? If not I don't think the weight penalty outweighs the benefit. It does "deaden" the trail though, much like suspension. Very noticeable. I run it front and back in my race wheels and just in the rear on my trail wheel set. I've heard it allows you to run regular sidewall tires but for my last race at Bootleg I had cushcore and a DD in the rear. Planning on experimenting with EXO and cushcore in a couple of weeks.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    I think you mean cushcore?

    It's a game changer if you ride hard enough to require it. Are you tearing tires and/or hitting your rim at 30psi in the back routinely? If not I don't think the weight penalty outweighs the benefit. It does "deaden" the trail though, much like suspension. Very noticeable. I run it front and back in my race wheels and just in the rear on my trail wheel set. I've heard it allows you to run regular sidewall tires but for my last race at Bootleg I had cushcore and a DD in the rear. Planning on experimenting with EXO and cushcore in a couple of weeks.
    Yes, thanks. Fixed, coffee was broken.

    Cool, this is what I need to know. I run usually 28psi front and 32psi rear on 28mm IW rims, so I figured it's worth an ask. Doesn't seem like it.
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    I've been running Cush Core since last July. My main motivation was to stop smashing rims, of which Double Down casings did not help, and Huck Norris was a minor help.
    Cush Core solved the rim smashing problem for me, allowed me to drop 4psi of tire pressure, still has sidewall support similar to the higher tire pressure, and the damping effect is noticeable. I'm a big fan, and have not had a flat tire since (which is a big improvement for me). This is why it has been added to the GG website so you can check the box for Cush Core when ordering a frame/bike.

    Where I think it might not make sense is with lighter/less aggressive riders that do not smash rims, already run lower tire pressures, don't have issues with sidewall support, and want to keep their bike as light as possible.

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    Currently trying Cushcore and EXO casing in rear with DD casing up front in my Shred Dogg with good results so far. I get the additional support to prevent burping in hard corners as well as rim ding protection (mostly an issues in the rear for me) while the DD up front lets me run a bit lower pressure without feeling squirmy.

    FWIW I am 210lb without gear and am pretty aggressive.

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    ^^^^ That's a pretty non-standard DD/Cushcore setup but one that Bryn Atkinson prefers on a lot of trails for the positive turn-in on the front tire and protection on the rear tire.

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    Just chiming in here. My experience is the same as mtg7aa. I was destroying too many rims and was running Maxxis DD tires on the rear. Now with Cushcore, I'm about 5-6 PSI lower, run EXO casing, have yet to dent a rim or get a flat (now I'll get a flat since I said it).

    This setup allows lower pressures that without the insert the tire would totally squirm on hard cornering, but now feels solid. The lower pressures allow more traction and control. At first, I was afraid to run such crazy low pressures, but I kept letting it get lower and lower and am amazed at the pressures I'm running now.

    I ran Schwalbe's Procore for quite a bit of time a couple years ago and, although Cushcore is not simple to install, it is still easier and simpler than Procore. Cushcore also performs much better than Procore, IMO.

    Again, if you are not destroying rims or running crazy high pressures to keep from pinch-flatting or smashing rims, they are probably not for you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by .thumper. View Post

    Again, if you are not destroying rims or running crazy high pressures to keep from pinch-flatting or smashing rims, they are probably not for you.
    Iíd quibble with this a bit. I donít know if Iím easy on rims, if Iíve been lucky, or if Nobls are just that good, but I havenít had any past issues with breaking rims. I ride primarily in a super rocky area, and Iím starting to ride more of the features with more speed so I figured it couldnít hurt to throw a CC in the rear as a preventative measure.

    On an EXO DHR II, Iím running 5 psi lower with the accompanying better grip and zero sidewall wallow. The damper ride quality encourages more speed. Everything we spend money on to make the rear wheel do is made better by CC, except for the weight thing, which is noticeable, but not that big of a deal on a bike intended to smash.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kragu View Post
    Iíd quibble with this a bit...
    True enough. My statement was a little too restricting. My primary reason at first was to keep from destroying rims, but given the other performance improvements, it can be worth it for other reasons as well. I guess each user needs to determine for themselves if the added weight penalty and additional work in swapping tires is worth it. I think in most cases it will be a performance improvement though unless you are mainly focused on light wheels.

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    Cush core?

    Install is a bit of a PITA, but for anyone interested in my ~20 min method...

    Make sure you're using a CC valve or modify a regular one so the inner air hole doesn't get covered by the CC insert.

    Edit: per thumperís suggestion, liberally spray a soapy water solution in the tire and on the bead particularly in steps 3 and 4.

    1. Stand in the insert and stretch it a little bit first. It comes somewhat stiff and tight. Work it a little and it'll loosen up a little bit, but I'd imagine there's such as thing as too much. You'll wind up doing this anyway trying to get it on the wheel... IMO it's a lot easier if you take the wheel out of the equation first.
    2. Use CC's hammer method to hold the insert and wheel. Work your way around to seat the CC into the rim.
    3. Put the whole wheel and CC inside of a tire before you try to seat either bead. Double check tread direction. Triple check tread direction.
    4. CC recommends putting as much of the bead onto the wheel as you can by hand, then pushing the bead under the CC with a tire lever. This didn't work for me. Rather, just grab the tire and the CC inside, lift the insert away from the rim a bit (hammer still holding the wheel, if need be) and stuff the bead under the CC into the center of the rim. Way, way easier than pushing in the bead with a tire lever. Last 8-10 inches of bead needed a lever, but that went in easy.
    5. Repeat on other side.
    6. Remove valve core, inject sealant, replace core, air up, mount wheel.
    7. Go smash.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kragu View Post
    Install is a bit of a PITA, but for anyone interested in my ~20 min method...

    Make sure you're using a CC valve or modify a regular one so the inner air hole doesn't get covered by the CC insert.

    1. Stand in the insert and stretch it a little bit first. It comes somewhat stiff and tight. Work it a little and it'll loosen up a little bit, but I'd imagine there's such as thing as too much. You'll wind up doing this anyway trying to get it on the wheel... IMO it's a lot easier if you take the wheel out of the equation first.
    2. Use CC's hammer method to hold the insert and wheel. Work your way around to seat the CC into the rim.
    3. Put the whole wheel and CC inside of a tire before you try to seat either bead. Double check tread direction. Triple check tread direction.
    4. CC recommends putting as much of the bead onto the wheel as you can by hand, then pushing the bead under the CC with a tire lever. This didn't work for me. Rather, just grab the tire and the CC inside, lift the insert away from the rim a bit (hammer still holding the wheel, if need be) and stuff the bead under the CC into the center of the rim. Way, way easier than pushing in the bead with a tire lever. Last 8-10 inches of bead needed a lever, but that went in easy.
    5. Repeat on other side.
    6. Remove valve core, inject sealant, replace core, air up, mount wheel.
    7. Go smash.
    I will add that the install becomes INCREDIBLY easier if you generously use lubrication. When I'm installing, I have a spray bottle with soapy water and am sure to get the inside of tire, tire bead, and Cushcore insert liberally covered with soapy water from the spray bottle and installation is only mildly more difficult. In kragu's step 4, pushing the tire bead into the rim with the tire lever is actually possible and is not really all that difficult in my experience. Of course, rim and tire combinations can make this easier or more difficult. I've had easy installations using these recommendations with Maxxis Minion DHF, DHRII, Aggressor, Shorty and HRII. EXO casings.

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    Another thing I'm interested in with Cushcore is the fact that they will (or already have?) come out with 27.5+ inserts. I am not a big fan of 27.5 tires in general use because to get the tire pressures where I want them, the tire becomes too squirmy under hard cornering and likely to pinch-flat or damage rims, and running higher pressures, they become too bouncy. With Cushcore, I think I can get the cornering support and sidewall/rim protection that I need for them to perform well.

    However, 27.5+ is already pretty slow rolling and slow-accelerating, and adding these inserts may exacerbate this problem. Either way, I might end up riding plus tires for fun more often now if I get some plus Cushcore inserts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by .thumper. View Post
    My statement was a little too restricting.
    No it actually made a lot of sense to me. Spending money, making tire swaps a PITA and adding weight to your wheels to solve a problem you are not having doesn't make any sense to me.
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    Quote Originally Posted by .thumper. View Post
    I will add that the install becomes INCREDIBLY easier if you generously use lubrication. When I'm installing, I have a spray bottle with soapy water and am sure to get the inside of tire, tire bead, and Cushcore insert liberally covered with soapy water from the spray bottle and installation is only mildly more difficult. In kragu's step 4, pushing the tire bead into the rim with the tire lever is actually possible and is not really all that difficult in my experience. Of course, rim and tire combinations can make this easier or more difficult. I've had easy installations using these recommendations with Maxxis Minion DHF, DHRII, Aggressor, Shorty and HRII. EXO casings.
    Ah, yes. I knew I forgot something. Edited my previous post.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    No it actually made a lot of sense to me. Spending money, making tire swaps a PITA and adding weight to your wheels to solve a problem you are not having doesn't make any sense to me.
    Not sure itís sole purpose is to solve a problem. I was riding fine at 25psi in the rear, but at 20 with a CC I have more sidewall support, more grip, additional damping, and more protection which is probably the benefit I need the least of all. For riders who are less aggressive on burly terrain, or place a higher premium on wheel weight (Iíve got a Trail Pistol for that!) some of the positives are cancelled out for sure, and I can see standing pat with your current setup making sense.

    Thatís not to say that every aggressive rider I know likes Cush Core. Some prefer the livelier feel and the trail feedback you get from running higher pressures than they can likely get away with. Like anything and everything in this game, there are always compromises...

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    Quote Originally Posted by kragu View Post
    Not sure itís sole purpose is to solve a problem.
    If you are being forced to run higher pressures than you want to avoid tire damage to I would call that a problem, but I understand your point.
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    If you are being forced to run higher pressures than you want to avoid tire damage to I would call that a problem, but I understand your point.
    I guess that's all about your baseline, and that of norms in the sport. It's just a fact of life that you have to run higher pressures in a 27.5 tire than a 27.5+ tire, and that for a multitude of reasons. I dunno if I'd call them "problems" so much as just realities. It's a universal condition that if you run pressures too low you get squirm and rim damage.

    But yeah, mostly semantics.

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    Huck Norris claims you can go from DoubleDown to EXO... I tried that and killed a rear rim in 1 ride at Dakota Ridge.

    I typically run 30psi rear with a Maxxis DoubleDown or WTB TCS Tough casing. On shuttle runs and big square edgey stuff (like UPS/LPS in Moab) I'll bump it up to 33-35PSI in attempt to save the rim.

    Will CushCore and EXO casings truly protect a rear rim basher like me? Or would I have to take the CushCore weight penalty and still keep the 2-ply casing?
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

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    Quote Originally Posted by 06HokieMTB View Post
    Huck Norris claims you can go from DoubleDown to EXO... I tried that and killed a rear rim in 1 ride at Dakota Ridge.

    I typically run 30psi rear with a Maxxis DoubleDown or WTB TCS Tough casing. On shuttle runs and big square edgey stuff (like UPS/LPS in Moab) I'll bump it up to 33-35PSI in attempt to save the rim.

    Will CushCore and EXO casings truly protect a rear rim basher like me? Or would I have to take the CushCore weight penalty and still keep the 2-ply casing?
    There are a ton of variables involved, one of them being the density and thickness of the foam. The CC is more dense, more stiff, and thicker than the HN, for sure. I would imagine that would translate to more protection, but whether thatís enough depends on the other variables.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kragu View Post
    There are a ton of variables involved, one of them being the density and thickness of the foam. The CC is more dense, more stiff, and thicker than the HN, for sure. I would imagine that would translate to more protection, but whether thatís enough depends on the other variables.
    To put it in other words: I'm not certain I'm seeing the benefit from Huck Norris as I'm still running 2-ply casings and high(ish) pressures.

    Cush Core's technology seems solid - but not sure I'd want to pedal them with 2-ply casings and burly rims... thus my question above.

    I'm actually leaning towards having two rear wheels (as that's what I kill). One massively overbuilt for lift/shuttle/"enduro-brah" type stuff and one for every day riding.
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

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    Quote Originally Posted by 06HokieMTB View Post
    To put it in other words: I'm not certain I'm seeing the benefit from Huck Norris as I'm still running 2-ply casings and high(ish) pressures.

    Cush Core's technology seems solid - but not sure I'd want to pedal them with 2-ply casings and burly rims... thus my question above.
    Short answer, the CC is better than the HN. Whether it's good enough for you to drop to EXO or Light casings I can't say. I know a lot of people around my area (lots of sharp rocks, lots of speed, lots of hucks into rough terrain) running EXO w/ CC. I can't imagine pedaling a Tough/High Grip Vigilate with a CC. That'd be like 1500g back there....

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    Kragu - where are you located? (or where do you regularly ride?)
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

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    Hokie, yes Cush Core is better for rim protection than thicker casing tires. You have a similar situation as I did last year. Double Down and DH casing tires is the best solution if you're slicing casings on rocks. But, if you're pinch flatting the tire or smashing the rim, CC makes a big difference.

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    Also remember DD is only a difference in sidewall protection. As I understand it the tread is the same unless you go to a true DH tire. I raced at Bootleg in January and ran a DD tire AND cushcore in the back. Lots of weight but still manageable. I think one day I pedaled 6 laps. I'm hoping CC and an EXO works well but I have a history of tearing tires pretty bad.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    Also remember DD is only a difference in sidewall protection. As I understand it the tread is the same unless you go to a true DH tire. I raced at Bootleg in January and ran a DD tire AND cushcore in the back. Lots of weight but still manageable. I think one day I pedaled 6 laps. I'm hoping CC and an EXO works well but I have a history of tearing tires pretty bad.
    Nick I've been on cushcore and exo casings for almost a year now. I was on DD casing before that. No torn sidewalls or flats at all yet. If course now that I say that, I'll flat this weekend riding with you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by .thumper. View Post
    Nick I've been on cushcore and exo casings for almost a year now. I was on DD casing before that. No torn sidewalls or flats at all yet. If course now that I say that, I'll flat this weekend riding with you.

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    I have a clapped out HR2 DD from my last trip down there still on the bike and a brand new Aggressor EXO and CC insert waiting for that tire to fail on our first ride
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    I have a clapped out HR2 DD from my last trip down there still on the bike and a brand new Aggressor EXO and CC insert waiting for that tire to fail on our first ride
    Cool. We can work on flat tires and broken bikes in Sedona while everyone else shreds!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 06HokieMTB View Post
    Kragu - where are you located? (or where do you regularly ride?)
    SoCal. Simi Valley is our burly spot, but I ride all over the area. Mt. Wilson, Santa Monicas, Santa Anas, Laguna, Santa Barbara (pre-Thomas fire and ensuing floods)...

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    For those running cushcore, are you using it front and rear or rear only?

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpearce1475 View Post
    For those running cushcore, are you using it front and rear or rear only?
    I started running it specifically to keep from destroying rear rims. However, with all its advantages, I now run it front and rear. The only negative to Cushcore is the weight; at around 200g, the positives outweigh the negatives, and I absolutely run it in the front as well! Some of the performance increases are even more noticeable and advantageous when running in the front tire!

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    Is that 200 grams each or for 200g for both?
    I no longer like to party. But I like the idea of it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by almazing View Post
    Is that 200 grams each or for 200g for both?
    I believe 200g each? Not exactly sure on weight, I just remember it being somewhere around that.

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    I'd be curious to hear what everyone's before and after tire pressures were/are with rider weight factored in.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott2MTB View Post
    I'd be curious to hear what everyone's before and after tire pressures were/are with rider weight factored in.
    Before Cushcore, I was running Double Down casing on rear and EXO front. When riding fast, rocky stuff, I'd be at 31psi rear and 28 front. I wasn't pinch flatting tires with that setup due to incredible Stans Flow MK3 rims, but I was denting them in extreme situations.

    I'm now on EXO front and rear. I keep playing with pressures with Cushcore, but I seem to be settling in at 22-23 rear and 18-19 front. I've been at that for about six months now with 0 pinch flats, flat tires or dented rims. I now have increased traction, better suspension and now I actually wear out a tire instead of replacing due to damage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by .thumper. View Post
    Before Cushcore, I was running Double Down casing on rear and EXO front. When riding fast, rocky stuff, I'd be at 31psi rear and 28 front. I wasn't pinch flatting tires with that setup due to incredible Stans Flow MK3 rims, but I was denting them in extreme situations.

    I'm now on EXO front and rear. I keep playing with pressures with Cushcore, but I seem to be settling in at 22-23 rear and 18-19 front. I've been at that for about six months now with 0 pinch flats, flat tires or dented rims. I now have increased traction, better suspension and now I actually wear out a tire instead of replacing due to damage.

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    And how much do you weigh? Also I think, tire size and rim ID matters here. Pressure differences can be pretty dramatically different with all those variables moving.

    As an aside, my experience with DD tires is that you need more air for a given width. They also donít seem to stretch up to the advertised size the way EXO casings do, which implies that they end up having less volume - which again means you need more air.

    Iíve also been destroying rear rims. I didnít used to have that problem on trail bikes as frequently, and very rarely on my DH bike as it was properly shod with heavy AL rims and heavy casings. With the Smash, Iíve been smashing though the sections that I used to go more carefully through unless I was on the DH bike, so thatís a factor. I also have been just running EXO casings in the rear. Through painful (to the wallet) experimentation I have found that 22/25 PSI front and rear on 33/30 ID rims seems to protect me from that. Iím using an e13 TRSr up front and usually the Aggressor as a rear. The 22psi up front is the edge of what starts to feel too soft when cornering hard and/or jumping, without really considering whatís needed to prevent rim damage. 25psi in the back is right on the edge of what feels a little firm to get the best grip out of a 2.3 Aggressor, mostly noticeable at low uphill speeds on typical SoCal loose over hard. I weigh about 172lbs before riding gear, and I think most people would put my riding far into the aggressive side of the spectrum, and I am one of those people thatís always breaking sh!7.

    So the challenge is that for enduro racing and ďearning my turnsĒ I want better protection on the rear, but I donít want to add any weight. I use the Aggressor because it has good grip, breaking, AND good rolling speed. 200g for a CushCore insert is similar to the difference between EXO and DD (I think), but I donít see how it adds more resistance to sidewall cuts. It also doesnít seem (based on Grantís response, and who seems to be a similar rider to myself) to add that much actual PSI advantage, unless heís riding 24mm ID rims with 2.3 casings and weighs a lot more than me.

    Anyway, just my early morning ramblings.
    Last edited by Scott2MTB; 03-11-2018 at 06:01 AM. Reason: Missing punctuation

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott2MTB View Post
    And how much do you weigh? Also I think, tire size and rim ID matters here. Pressure differences can be pretty dramatically different with all those variables moving.

    As an aside, my experience with DD tires is that you need more air for a given width. They also donít seem to stretch up to the advertised size the way EXO casings do, which implies that they end up having less volume - which again means you need more air.

    Iíve also been destroying rear rims. I didnít used to have that problem on trail bikes as frequently, and very rarely on my DH bike as it was properly shod with heavy AL rims and heavy casings. With the Smash, Iíve been smashing though the sections that I used to go more carefully through unless I was on the DH bike, so thatís a factor. I also have been just running EXO casings in the rear. Through painful (to the wallet) experimentation I have found that 22/25 PSI front and rear on 33/30 ID rims seems to protect me from that. Iím using an e13 TRSr up front and usually the Aggressor as a rear. The 22psi up front is the edge of what starts to feel too soft when cornering hard and/or jumping, without really considering whatís needed to prevent rim damage. 25psi in the back is right on the edge of what feels a little firm to get the best grip out of a 2.3 Aggressor, mostly noticeable at low uphill speeds on typical SoCal loose over hard. I weigh about 172lbs before riding gear, and I think most people would put my riding far into the aggressive side of the spectrum, and I am one of those people thatís always breaking sh!7.

    So the challenge is that for enduro racing and ďearning my turnsĒ I want better protection on the rear, but I donít want to add any weight. I use the Aggressor because it has good grip, breaking, AND good rolling speed. 200g for a CushCore insert is similar to the difference between EXO and DD (I think), but I donít see how it adds more resistance to sidewall cuts. It also doesnít seem (based on Grantís response, and who seems to be a similar rider to myself) to add that much actual PSI advantage, unless heís riding 24mm ID rims with 2.3 casings and weighs a lot more than me.

    Anyway, just my early morning ramblings.
    My riding weight is 205-210, so I do weigh a lot more than you hence the higher pressures. I ride aggressively and fast and I know the limits of components I can ride without destroying. Ultra lightweight stuff doesn't last long for me. With DD aggressors and Stans Flow mk3 rims, I wasn't destroying tires or flatting, but I was occasionally denting a rim under extreme situations, which seemed to be occurring once a month or so during race season.

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    Ditto above...

    Iím 190 ready to ride, used to run 27/28psi in front with a DHF 2.5 and routinely smacked rim. Rear 31/32psi with an aggressor DD 2.3 on 30mm ID rims and tore a couple of them wide open, one brand new but admittedly it was bad line choice. The last time i ran an exo alone in the rear it lasted exactly 1 mile before I pinched it and flatted. Since then Iíve switched from a DD back to an EXO and Iíve got almost 150 miles on it without issue. Lowered front pressure to 23 and rear to 26. Iím sold, and that doesnít even take in the damping effect. I notice no weight difference switching from DD to EXO/CC. The CC adds a lot of support to the sidewall. Iím faster than Grant except for on the smoothest of trails 😂😉

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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    Ditto above...

    Iím 190 ready to ride, used to run 27/28psi in front with a DHF 2.5 and routinely smacked rim. Rear 31/32psi with an aggressor DD 2.3 on 30mm ID rims and tore a couple of them wide open, one brand new but admittedly it was bad line choice. The last time i ran an exo alone in the rear it lasted exactly 1 mile before I pinched it and flatted. Since then Iíve switched from a DD back to an EXO and Iíve got almost 150 miles on it without issue. Lowered front pressure to 23 and rear to 26. Iím sold, and that doesnít even take in the damping effect. I notice no weight difference switching from DD to EXO/CC. The CC adds a lot of support to the sidewall. Iím faster than Grant except for on the smoothest of trails
    Ok so what about for DH and not trail? Itís already got dh casing but was curious if cush core still made sense.
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    Quote Originally Posted by stripes View Post
    Ok so what about for DH and not trail? Itís already got dh casing but was curious if cush core still made sense.
    If you followed the previous posts... DH yes (IMO). More traction via lower pressures and rebound damping. Flat prevention and sidewall support aren't the only benefits. If I actually still *had* a DH bike, cushcore would be a no brainer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by .thumper. View Post
    If you followed the previous posts... DH yes (IMO). More traction via lower pressures and rebound damping. Flat prevention and sidewall support aren't the only benefits. If I actually still *had* a DH bike, cushcore would be a no brainer.
    Well, I did.. but we got sidetracked a bit

    Cool.. thanks.
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    Quote Originally Posted by .thumper. View Post
    If I actually still *had* a DH bike, cushcore would be a no brainer.

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    I sold my DH bike too and was considering cushcore with a non-carbon wheelset for park days on the Smash. My buddies keep pushing to get another DH rig, most of them are 26 for life kind of guys and hate that I'm riding a 29er, but I'm faster than them on the Smash :P

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott2MTB View Post
    I sold my DH bike too and was considering cushcore with a non-carbon wheelset for park days on the Smash. My buddies keep pushing to get another DH rig, most of them are 26 for life kind of guys and hate that I'm riding a 29er, but I'm faster than them on the Smash :P
    Yeah, even a 26" DH bike felt slow to me after riding the MT on DH runs. It just wouldn't go.
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    I want to hear more about who's faster, Thumper or StreetDoctor
    Biker? I don't even know her.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SylentK View Post
    I want to hear more about who's faster, Thumper or StreetDoctor
    Haha! Thumper of course. StreetDoctor is only faster on streets!

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    Ive seen cushcores only last for 2 tire changes? Also anyone try the FTD inserts? 27.5+ is now available from FTD however cushcore wont release there inserts until late spring.

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    Sounds promising.

    What about fixing flats on the trail, where you just want to stick a tube in it and ride out? I cut a tire at night on the trail with Procore, and absolutely could not get the tire off (it had apparently glued itself to the rim).

    I do think there is a lot of potential improvement here, but for now I addressed it by going with 2.6 tires. Not the same level of protection as PC or CC, but I'm keeping it simple.

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    Great Thread. I ran procore and now cushcore. Both were game changing in regards to rim protection, increased traction at lower psi, better suspension, AND NO MORE PINCHFLATS.

    Cushcore is easier to install than procore if you watch the video. Performance is better too, due to the increase in sidewall stability. I was running rear only, but just installed on the front to see if I can tell a difference. Probably not fir you if you are an xc racer on smooth terrain. But if you like lots of sharp rocks, then Yes. Game changing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by laksboy View Post
    Great Thread. I ran procore and now cushcore. Both were game changing in regards to rim protection, increased traction at lower psi, better suspension, AND NO MORE PINCHFLATS.

    Cushcore is easier to install than procore if you watch the video. Performance is better too, due to the increase in sidewall stability. I was running rear only, but just installed on the front to see if I can tell a difference. Probably not fir you if you are an xc racer on smooth terrain. But if you like lots of sharp rocks, then Yes. Game changing.
    Cool, I'm going to try this in my DH bike. I couldn't get the tire pressure to feel right between feeling like the tire is going to roll, or too flat with no sidewall support.
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  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by stumpynerd View Post
    Ive seen cushcores only last for 2 tire changes?
    Is this true?
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by 06HokieMTB View Post
    Is this true?
    Not in my experience

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    Quote Originally Posted by laksboy View Post
    Great Thread. I ran procore and now cushcore. Both were game changing in regards to rim protection, increased traction at lower psi, better suspension, AND NO MORE PINCHFLATS.
    I'm no monster rider. But agree it was game-changing to be able to bomb something without having to ride light (and eventually you will mess up and hear that dreaded CLANG). I'd usually run around 85 psi on the inner with my Procore, and whatever pressure gripped and handled best on the outer. I was able to pretty much disregard any concerns with wrecking a tire or rim with a rock strike.

    You can always crank up the pressure to solve the problem, but running lower pressures is kind of addictive.

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    I'm going to go against the grain here and say these solve a problem that don't exist. If you're constantly rolling tires and denting rims, adding a few more PSI is a free fix. Alternatively, why not just run a heavier weight casing (which is probably less added weight than this) with tougher sidewalls that don't get cut so easily, chunkier sidewalls also dampen better so that gives you the improved cushioning too. To me, these seem to be adding the weight of a heavy tire with none of the benefit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluidworks View Post
    I'm going to go against the grain here and say these solve a problem that don't exist. If you're constantly rolling tires and denting rims, adding a few more PSI is a free fix. Alternatively, why not just run a heavier weight casing (which is probably less added weight than this) with tougher sidewalls that don't get cut so easily, chunkier sidewalls also dampen better so that gives you the improved cushioning too. To me, these seem to be adding the weight of a heavy tire with none of the benefit.
    Adding a few PSI is not a free fix. It may not cost monetarily, actually for some it could cost thousands indirectly, but it absolutely will reduce traction and increase one's chances of being bounced off line.

    Also, a heavier weight casing is not going to behave the same as a lighter weight one with a rim protector installed. It will be nowhere near as supple, again reducing traction. Also, in Cushcore's case specifically, it lets one get away with lighter tires AND lighter rims so there is an overall weight loss when used to its maximum. For many it just improves the ride and is extra insurance should they mess up. Another added benefit is it can be used as a runflat in a pinch.

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  55. #55
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    Have any of you used the Enve M series rims with the M series rim strips? I wonder how the Enve system would compare to Cush Core or a similar system?

  56. #56
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    Installed my Cushcore last night.

    It took about 2 Grapefruit Sculpins (that's beer, in layman's terms Of course, it's kinda hard to drink while man-handling tires/rims.

    My setup:

    Stans Flow Ex rims
    Maxxis Rekon 2.6 x 29 (already installed and ridden many times)

    Lessons learned (in addition to what is already listed in this thread):

    1) Technique will pay off more than straight brute strength. (dam my cubicle hands!)
    2) Speaking of weak ass hands, using a sturdy, rounded thing to help support the rim while trying to jam in the tire bead pays off in dividends. In the video, they use a round trash can. I ended up using something else that allowed me to use 2 hands on the tire lever to really jam in that bead. That worked like a charm. And is key, IMO.

    Not really looking forward to changing a flat or tires. But definitely stoked on getting it done! Now to ride!
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldHouseMan View Post
    Have any of you used the Enve M series rims with the M series rim strips? I wonder how the Enve system would compare to Cush Core or a similar system?
    I haven't tried the Enve rims with the rim strips, but they appear to be a rubber strip, which the Maxxis Double Down tires have in the sidewall for the same purpose. A rubber strip is not in the same ballpark as CushCore for damping and bottom out resistance.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by stripes View Post
    Cool, I'm going to try this in my DH bike. I couldn't get the tire pressure to feel right between feeling like the tire is going to roll, or too flat with no sidewall support.
    Installed FTDs on my DH rig early last DH season. Mostly to save rims as our local DH is old school chunk. Brutal. Was able to drop my psi and had an immense bump in traction. Never felt a rim ding since. PITA to set up, but once set up, bombproof. They do add noticeable weight, but you could almost run our hill chainless so pedaling is a non-issue. If I was on a hill that was pedally I'd sooner run lighter tires than loose the FTDs. Inserts also let me get away with a bit lighter rim - dt ex471s.

    Heck, Gwin's been running them for a few years and it sure hasn't hurt him.

    Doubt I'd run inserts on a trail bike as I expect they'd take a lot of the snap out of the bike.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtg7aa View Post
    I haven't tried the Enve rims with the rim strips, but they appear to be a rubber strip, which the Maxxis Double Down tires have in the sidewall for the same purpose. A rubber strip is not in the same ballpark as CushCore for damping and bottom out resistance.
    I was under the impression the Enve rim strips allowed for lower tire pressure and improved pinch flat protection.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldHouseMan View Post
    I was under the impression the Enve rim strips allowed for lower tire pressure and improved pinch flat protection.
    They do but it's still nowhere near the same league. One is chasing one specific purpose while the other takes care of many.

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    I am running cushcore front and back but wondering if it may be a bit overkill, and I may be better running something like hucknorris front and cush core in the rear?

    I am only riding trail and want to keep things as light and snappy as possible, but still want rim protection.

    Thanks In advance for feedback..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mhpepper View Post
    I am running cushcore front and back but wondering if it may be a bit overkill, and I may be better running something like hucknorris front and cush core in the rear?

    I am only riding trail and want to keep things as light and snappy as possible, but still want rim protection.

    Thanks In advance for feedback..
    If you are not pinch flatting tires on your front wheel, having huck norris won't help you with anything. I think that's the only use for huck norris, and it doesn't even do that as well as Cushcore. In my opinion, you run Cushcore in front for superior traction! Lower pressures, no tire squirm and added confidence. Cushcore really isn't that heavy. It weighs about as much as a tube.

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    Quote Originally Posted by .thumper. View Post
    If you are not pinch flatting tires on your front wheel, having huck norris won't help you with anything. I think that's the only use for huck norris, and it doesn't even do that as well as Cushcore. In my opinion, you run Cushcore in front for superior traction! Lower pressures, no tire squirm and added confidence. Cushcore really isn't that heavy. It weighs about as much as a tube.
    Do you like them in the front and rear? Or just the rear with the heavier casing?
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  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by stripes View Post
    Do you like them in the front and rear? Or just the rear with the heavier casing?
    Front and rear. Without question. Having Cushcore in the front is more for increased traction and sidewall support over pinch-flat or rim damage, however. Running it in the rear is for all of those things.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stripes View Post
    Do you like them in the front and rear? Or just the rear with the heavier casing?
    I run them front and rear as well for the same reason as thumper. If you run it in the rear only, you'll have better rear traction than front...sounds sub optimal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtg7aa View Post
    I run them front and rear as well for the same reason as thumper. If you run it in the rear only, you'll have better rear traction than front...sounds sub optimal.
    Agreed, that does sound suboptimal.

    Cool, I'm really tempted to try it in my Shred Dogg. I'm getting it in my DH bike, which I'm stoked about.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtg7aa View Post
    I run them front and rear as well for the same reason as thumper. If you run it in the rear only, you'll have better rear traction than front...sounds sub optimal.
    That's my experience also. I put it just in the rear and had DHF front and rear. I didn't like it as the front would give before the rear which is disconcerting.
    I did find a fun setup was a DHF front with no cushcore and an Ardent Race rear with cushcore. Normally that combo feels sketchy but is a nice fast combo with the insert.

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    Well, I broke another carbon rim this past weekend in Sedona. I swear I was JRA... This time it was the HD version of a LB rim. I've never gone through rims like this before the Smash. Do you think GG messed up my frame and put too much "I like to go Fast" in it?

    At any rate, I'll be trying out Cush Core asap...

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott2MTB View Post
    Well, I broke another carbon rim this past weekend in Sedona. I swear I was JRA... This time it was the HD version of a LB rim. I've never gone through rims like this before the Smash. Do you think GG messed up my frame and put too much "I like to go Fast" in it?

    At any rate, I'll be trying out Cush Core asap...
    Glad you are converting to Cushcore, it's a good idea whether you are breaking rims or not. Sad you broke your rim. GG bikes should maybe come with a disclaimer saying something about how you will be going faster and smashing into things faster and harder than ever before and that you should prepare properly.

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    Ok, I finally got my replacement rim and the rear wheel built up, and CC installed all around. Let's see if I can break another now.. must go find rocks to smash....

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    Two rides on the CC so far. It's pretty awesome. It actually adds enough extra grip and cush that crush mode is more useable for me on the more aggressive trails around here. I still prefer plush when pointed downhill though. In terms of feel, I think I prefer a non-cc rear tire, but I desperately need the protection back there. Up front, it's great.

    I tested it out though and it definitely works as advertised. I came in slow and cased a rock gap hard, the same way I did the last time I pinch flatted, running about 3 psi lower than usual and the wheel and tire shrugged it off no problem.

    The first install was a real PITA though. Second one went smoothly, once I had the feel of it.

  72. #72
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    Just picked up a set of CC for my 29Ē i35 WTB Asyms,

    Just had umbilical hernai surgery a few days ago so wrestling with installation was humbling.

    I was able to wrestle the CC onto the rim using my hands and wrists... no hammer no nothing

    But failed at getting the 2nd bead onto the rim... i was simply not strong enough for the manhandling necc. to get the install done....

    Not giving up though... will come back with more lube and a few more days of healing

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikeetheviking View Post
    Just picked up a set of CC for my 29Ē i35 WTB Asyms,

    Just had umbilical hernai surgery a few days ago so wrestling with installation was humbling.

    I was able to wrestle the CC onto the rim using my hands and wrists... no hammer no nothing

    But failed at getting the 2nd bead onto the rim... i was simply not strong enough for the manhandling necc. to get the install done....

    Not giving up though... will come back with more lube and a few more days of healing
    I had a heckuva time with my front tire - the new e13 TRSr. I ended up leaving it out in the direct sun until it was nice and hot and then it was much more cooperative. Good luck and heal up!

  74. #74
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    Thanks, Scott2MTB

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    Alright guys,

    I became a real boy last night and got that dang tire mounted!

    My triumphant feat was short lived the moment i realized i mounted my front tire on the rear! Doh!

    Ended up lubing the crap out of everything, the CC, the tire, the rim, everything. I used a set of motorcycle tire levers/spoons and she mounted like a dream.

    Note: with everything properly lubed i was able to push the tire bead into the rim well easier and deeper once she was properly lubed. Using a moto tire lever made this easier and using the CC trashcan idea made this easier too.

    will post ride feedback in a few weeks!

    Thanks for the encouragement guys!

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    After a number of weeks of riding with CC installed, I have to say that overall, I like it a lot. For me though, lowering 3psi from what I was running felt too draggy and slow. Right now I'm only 1.5psi below what I was running, but I still have way better grip due to the volume decrease reducing the effective "firmness" of the tire.

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    What size tires and what PSI are you running?

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    the updated TRSr Front (2.35) 19.5psi
    Agressor Rear (2.3) 23.5psi

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    1.5psi... Wow, you are like the princess and the pea. I'm not awesome enough nor is my pump accurate enough to tell the differnece between 1.5 psi.

    I also don't follow your sentance. The volume reduction would increase, not decrease the effective "firmness" of a tire. Just like a volume reducer in your shock. It adds more ramp and more "support." Whether that's truely noticable or not, I doubt it given the vast size difference in volume size of a tire vs a shock air spring, and the small overall volume change of your tire compressing over a rock. This firm support then greatly increases once the tire is fully compressed to the "firm" cushcore (which is softer of course than the firmness of your rim, but comes sooner).

    I think CC is great. I have it in 4 wheels currently.



    Quote Originally Posted by Scott2MTB View Post
    After a number of weeks of riding with CC installed, I have to say that overall, I like it a lot. For me though, lowering 3psi from what I was running felt too draggy and slow. Right now I'm only 1.5psi below what I was running, but I still have way better grip due to the volume decrease reducing the effective "firmness" of the tire.
    Last edited by laksboy; 06-06-2018 at 02:24 PM.

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    It's interesting how feedback for CushCore falls into two groups:

    1. Tries it and likes it
    2. Violently opposed to it, has to insult anyone who says they can notice a difference, does not try it.

    The GG guys I have talked to said they love them, most internet reviews are generally positive, I was watching a video and the TrailPeak guys said CushCore felt as ride changing as dropper posts to them.

    It really doesn't matter if you do not want to spend the money to try it. I just don't understand why anyone who does not want to try it comes out swinging with insults immediately.

    Edit: mis-read the post above me prior to his edit.
    Last edited by cassieno; 06-06-2018 at 03:41 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cassieno View Post
    It's interesting how feedback for CushCore falls into two groups:

    1. Tries it and likes it
    2. Violently opposed to it, has to insult anyone who says they can notice a difference, does not try it.

    The GG guys I have talked to said they love them, most internet reviews are generally positive, I was watching a video and the TrailPeak guys said CushCore felt as ride changing as dropper posts to them.

    It really doesn't matter if you do not want to spend the money to try it. I just don't understand why anyone who does not want to try it comes out swinging with insults immediately.
    Well, I won't insult anyone who doesn't like it. All I can assume is they had waaaay too much coffee and need to go out for a ride and step away from the keyboard.

    I have it on my GG/DH. I love Cush Core on it. Only one park ride on it, but being able to do something like ride with 20 psi in my tires as opposed to 28-30 reallly makes a big difference, especially when you're in the anti-grip of Granby (sand, sand for miles, with rocks). I'll have more feedback later in the season.

    It also takes the sting out of a lot of the beating you take from what I can tell. I like running my suspension on the firmer side, it's a nice little cushion.

    I'm not sure I'm putting it my Shred Dogg since I tend to run that at 25-26 front to 27-29 rear, but it means getting out to ride trails more often than I have the time to (I spend more time at the bike parks than the trails lately). Right now, I'm really happy with it on the big bike.
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  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by stripes View Post
    Well, I won't insult anyone who doesn't like it. All I can assume is they had waaaay too much coffee and need to go out for a ride and step away from the keyboard.

    I have it on my GG/DH. I love Cush Core on it. Only one park ride on it, but being able to do something like ride with 20 psi in my tires as opposed to 28-30 reallly makes a big difference, especially when you're in the anti-grip of Granby (sand, sand for miles, with rocks). I'll have more feedback later in the season.

    It also takes the sting out of a lot of the beating you take from what I can tell. I like running my suspension on the firmer side, it's a nice little cushion.

    I'm not sure I'm putting it my Shred Dogg since I tend to run that at 25-26 front to 27-29 rear, but it means getting out to ride trails more often than I have the time to (I spend more time at the bike parks than the trails lately). Right now, I'm really happy with it on the big bike.
    What's your rim/tire combo on your GG/DH. I've been running tubeless maxxis DH tires on my 26 inch GG/DH without issues since last year but am tempted by added security and burp prevention especially with a big whistler trip coming in July.

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by NCBigHit View Post
    What's your rim/tire combo on your GG/DH. I've been running tubeless maxxis DH tires on my 26 inch GG/DH without issues since last year but am tempted by added security and burp prevention especially with a big whistler trip coming in July.
    Mine is a 27.5" GG/DH, one of the last ones.

    Right now, the wheels that came off my Scott Gambler (Synchros rims) with 2.5 DHF DH.

    I'm getting new wheels built (Spank Race 33 with Hope Hubs), and I'm going to run a 2.5 DHF WT with double down casing on the front next. I'm not sure if you can move Cush Core from one wheelset to another though, or I have to buy a fresh set.
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  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by stripes View Post
    Mine is a 27.5" GG/DH, one of the last ones.

    Right now, the wheels that came off my Scott Gambler (Synchros rims) with 2.5 DHF DH.

    I'm getting new wheels built (Spank Race 33 with Hope Hubs), and I'm going to run a 2.5 DHF WT with double down casing on the front next. I'm not sure if you can move Cush Core from one wheelset to another though, or I have to buy a fresh set.
    Yes, you can move Cushcore from one wheelset to another.

  85. #85
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    I've gotten a few rides with CushCore on the back of my hardtail and a 2.3 Morsa G+ (previously running 2.3 Breakout Tough).

    Honestly, it's not revolutionary to me. Yeah it allows for lower pressures, but I find that the rear tire gets a little squirmy... maybe I went too low. I felt rocks bottom against the CC a couple times on my last ride.

    I'm going to soon install a 2.6 Rekon rear and see how that guy does with CushCore.

    The other CushCore insert is installed on the rear wheel of my (unridden) park wheelset. It has a Continental Der Kaiser Projekt tire (multi-ply casing with butyl insert). Surgery has kept me off the bike, so I'll report back once I make it to Angle Fire or Pajarito.
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

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    Hopefully I didn't miss it, but I read through this thread and haven't seen anyone running these on enves with mention of what they did with the valve stems.

    Does anyone know if I can use the stock enve valve stem, or will I have trouble letting air in/out of the tire?
    I'd really like to pick a set up to try out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by laksboy View Post
    1.5psi... Wow, you are like the princess and the pea. I'm not awesome enough nor is my pump accurate enough to tell the differnece between 1.5 psi.

    I also don't follow your sentance. The volume reduction would increase, not decrease the effective "firmness" of a tire. Just like a volume reducer in your shock. It adds more ramp and more "support."
    I think you just misinterpreted what Iím saying, or more likely, I just didnít say it very well, as I expressed a whole though process in one sentence. First though, I donít think that the comparison to a shock is valid here as the shock doesnít deform the way a tire does (or at all) and so you donít see much of the effects of a steeper force curve caused by the reduction in volume, in a tire.

    So anywayÖ I agree with you that the tire would feel firmer if you decreased the volume, while leaving the amount of air in the the tire constant (Ideal Gas Law, Boyles Law, etc) but weíre talking about reducing the volume with CC, then reducing the pressure back to the starting point (25psi for instance) and then maybe even lower. So realistically, the ďfirmnessĒ is the same (25psi), or effectively less if you decreased the pressure below the starting point.

    Bonus round:

    Now though, the same amount of force compresses the tire further, relative to the distance from the tire to the rim. Hereís a thought experiment:

    Imagine that a 200lb rider needs to exert a certain amount of force to compress a tire pressurized to 25psi one inch. If that rider exerts that same amount of force on a tire that only has .5 inches of travel, what happens?

    This is why lower volume tires require more pressure to prevent rim strikes and pinch flats. Experientially, we see this (though there is a logical fallacy here) as with the advent of wider rims and higher volume tires, people are running lower and lower pressures. CushCore comes to the rescue by compressing, at a slower rate than air, and providing a cushion between the rim and tire, and adding some structure to the tire.

    I know this is an oversimplification as there are a lot of other variables. (like changes in the mass of air, tire compound, tread, and thickness, etc.) But when we install CC, a lighter weight tire, and drop 4-5psi (which is a 20% decrease in pressure if you started at 25psi), you might imagine that there could be a large increase in drag - particularly if the pressure is low enough that the cornering knobs started to stay in contact with the ground - that raising the pressure back up might feel a little better?

    SoÖ Feeling the difference between 24psi and 25psi might be ďprincess in the peaĒ but I bet you could feel the difference between 21psi and 24psi.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 7ender View Post
    Hopefully I didn't miss it, but I read through this thread and haven't seen anyone running these on enves with mention of what they did with the valve stems.

    Does anyone know if I can use the stock enve valve stem, or will I have trouble letting air in/out of the tire?
    I'd really like to pick a set up to try out.
    Where is the air hole on Enve valve stem? If it's on the bottom, you will have to notch it to make it work.

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    Scott2MTB, we are in agreement. The Cushcore shortens the "travel" of the tire and provides more firmness (or "damping" if you believe cushcores marketing) deeper in the travel. Me, I like my tires at 15-18 psi. And they are probably dragging the side knobs but I like the traction and the suppleness and there's not a lot of high speed berms here. Just loose chunk.

  90. #90
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    Cush core?

    So if anyone doesn't mind buying a used set of 27.5Ē cush core, lemme know. It has 2 DH days on it, and I don't have the leg to pedal it, and I'll be happy to sell it to a good home for $75 for both.
    Last edited by stripes; 07-15-2018 at 08:50 PM.
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  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by stripes View Post
    So if anyone doesn't mind buying a used set of cush core, lemme know. It has 2 DH days on it, and I don't have the leg to pedal it, and I'll be happy to sell it to a good home for $75 for both.
    What size?

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

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    CushCore is more like a bottom out bumper + killmat (or other sound/vibration deadening material) on steroids, than a typical hydraulic damping unit. It has inherent damping in the form of hysteresis. Tires have damping in this form too, which they advertise as low rebound rubber compound. The vibration damping is useful, as it filters out feedback that may encourage deathgripping the bars.

    The air volume discussion seems kind of flawed. When a tire bottoms out due to impact, the air pressure doesn't increase like it does in an air spring, where it doubles when the volume gets halved. The tire compressing isn't even equivalent to 5% of the stroke in a typical air spring. The insert is merely like a bottom out bumper... the only part of the air volume you have to worry about is the actual psi you pump in. The lower the psi, the more surface contact area the tire has with the ground. The higher the surface contact area, the more forces are spread out, which reduces the chance that the surface breaks loose and causes you to lose traction. A rider typically only rides as confidently as the tire's minimum traction consistency allows. A tire can have hero dirt-like grip on 95% of the trail, but that unknown 0-5% that is greasy/slimy slippery will have the rider's confidence levels drop severely, as possibly less confident than a rider with a tire that has drifty traction on 100% of the trail.

    My personal beef with CushCore is how it makes it look like my tires are not spinning straight and true. It's like the tire is not fully seated (the line by the tire's bead appears above the rim flange evenly all around), or the casing tore. The wheel's true with even tension. Maybe my tires are F'd up... I have managed to get them looking straight before. Not enough of an issue to not use it, though I am looking at Mr. Wolf Banger as an alternative. If my bike gets any more heavier and more bomb proof, might need to consider shuttling. xD

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuckerjt07 View Post
    What size?

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
    27.5, Iíll go update the post. Thanks.
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    Quote Originally Posted by stripes View Post
    27.5, Iíll go update the post. Thanks.
    Was hoping it was 29ď

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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    My personal beef with CushCore is how it makes it look like my tires are not spinning straight and true. It's like the tire is not fully seated (the line by the tire's bead appears above the rim flange evenly all around), or the casing tore. The wheel's true with even tension. Maybe my tires are F'd up... I have managed to get them looking straight before.
    I'm in the same boat...

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    My personal beef with CushCore is how it makes it look like my tires are not spinning straight and true. It's like the tire is not fully seated (the line by the tire's bead appears above the rim flange evenly all around), or the casing tore. The wheel's true with even tension. Maybe my tires are F'd up... I have managed to get them looking straight before. Not enough of an issue to not use it, though I am looking at Mr. Wolf Banger as an alternative. If my bike gets any more heavier and more bomb proof, might need to consider shuttling. xD
    Me three, it seems like it's really hard to get tires on straight with cushcore. I don't quite understand what is going on, but it seems to make tires wobble.

    Anyone understand why or how to correct it?

  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by ac1000 View Post
    Me three, it seems like it's really hard to get tires on straight with cushcore. I don't quite understand what is going on, but it seems to make tires wobble.

    Anyone understand why or how to correct it?
    I hadn't had that problem until lately. I emailed them about it and it sounds like it's because my set needs to be replaced. I first started using this set about a year ago and have now purchased a replacement. My inserts have stretched out some; they are no longer are tight against the rim, they go on easily without need to stretch onto the rim.

    However, you can reduce or eliminate the wobble by pulling the valve core, then going around the wheel, feeling the insert and centering it on the tire. I have found that the wobble in my case seems to be caused by the insert not totally being centered on the tire. I've had limited success with this technique. It also seems that I'm more likely to get wobble with tires that have been mounted before.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by .thumper. View Post
    I hadn't had that problem until lately. I emailed them about it and it sounds like it's because my set needs to be replaced. I first started using this set about a year ago and have now purchased a replacement. My inserts have stretched out some; they are no longer are tight against the rim, they go on easily without need to stretch onto the rim.

    However, you can reduce or eliminate the wobble by pulling the valve core, then going around the wheel, feeling the insert and centering it on the tire. I have found that the wobble in my case seems to be caused by the insert not totally being centered on the tire. I've had limited success with this technique. It also seems that I'm more likely to get wobble with tires that have been mounted before.
    Personally, I've had this issue on my all new Megatrail build, new tires, inserts and rims... I think your tip is the good solution to solve this problem.

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    Cc tire wobble

    Quote Originally Posted by freddok View Post
    Personally, I've had this issue on my all new Megatrail build, new tires, inserts and rims... I think your tip is the good solution to solve this problem.
    Have the same issue on my new wheelset, worked like a charm last time but now itís way off..

    Have you managed to get it straight looking by pushing the cc to the center of the rim?

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    CC Tire wobble

    Quote Originally Posted by Graan View Post
    Have the same issue on my new wheelset, worked like a charm last time but now itís way off..

    Have you managed to get it straight looking by pushing the cc to the center of the rim?
    I'm also having this issue if anyone finds a good fix. New tire and CC, the rim isn't new, but it is straight.

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