Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Slowly but surely...
    Reputation: fmdj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    208

    Why I love my i-Drive

    So I use my 2000 XCR1000 for both commuting and MTBing, but I've been doing some work on my brother's GF 29'er hardtail, so I've commuted with it as I've been testing repairs. Man, I love my i-Drive. I forgot how "boingy" hardtails can be. And I did a highly scientific test of pushing myself as hard as I could home on his bike, then on mine, and found I was just as fast on mine, plus alot more comfortable (37 minutes for a 10 mile hilly ride on both bikes on knobbies). Got to love i-Drive's efficient system I don't think I'll be giving up this bike for a long time.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash.
    - Juli Furtado

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    954
    So I use my 2008 GT Force 2.0 for pretty much all kinds of trail riding. I know that I can't keep up with my friend on his Titus Racer Ti or the racing couple that comes out with a different set of bikes every other day wether it's singlespeed, hardtail or full susser. I know it weighs at least 5 lbs. more than their bikes, but when we get to the rough stuff, or there's a steep short technical climb, I can do it better than they can. I too love the I-drive's efficient systemThere's only two bikes that have brought a smile to my face: My 01 GT I-Drive Team and this sweet A$$ Force.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SanDiegan420's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    149
    yup i love pedaling hard with no bob.... but still comfy and in control over the rough stuff

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mtnbkr67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    18
    P1000128.JPG


    Still loving my 2001 Gt I-drive. Just added Easton XC 2 wheelset and Avid BB7 disc brakes

  5. #5
    Nice day for a ride.....
    Reputation: Bikin' Bric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    1,580
    My XCR1500 was great, until it cracked. It was the best suspension design I have ridden, blew my Fuel EX7 out of the water!
    I miss it.

  6. #6
    Vita brevis
    Reputation: rustus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    436
    Gotta love the I-drive... great going up or down.

  7. #7
    Slowly but surely...
    Reputation: fmdj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    208
    Quote Originally Posted by RatchAttack
    My XCR1500 was great, until it cracked. It was the best suspension design I have ridden, blew my Fuel EX7 out of the water!
    I miss it.
    I hear ya. Mine had the infamous seatpost crack. Got it welded and still riding it 2 years later.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash.
    - Juli Furtado

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tiensy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1
    Hi,

    i'm going to be a proud owner of an 2000 STS XCR 1000 I-Drive soon. Could someone please tell me how much time you spend on keeping the I-Drive Bushings lubed / the pivots working?

    Besides the weakpoint of the seatpost, is there anything else i should know about the frame to keep it going strong for a long time?

    Thanks.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KeepItSimpleSpeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    269

    ?

    Quote Originally Posted by fmdj
    I forgot how "boingy" hardtails can be. .
    How is a hardtail boingy? It's rigid. I guess I'm confused

  10. #10
    Nice day for a ride.....
    Reputation: Bikin' Bric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    1,580
    Quote Originally Posted by fmdj
    I hear ya. Mine had the infamous seatpost crack. Got it welded and still riding it 2 years later.
    I was considering having it welded but decided against it. The real bummer is that I bought the frame (a 2000 XCR 1500) brand new (old stock, never built) in spring of '08 and rode it about 15-20 times (it was my "2nd" bike, rode it for about 2 weeks while I was having custom wheels built for my Avalanche) and it cracked.... shitty deal

    The frame is sitting in my closet, collecting dust

  11. #11
    Slowly but surely...
    Reputation: fmdj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    208
    Quote Originally Posted by KeepItSimpleSpeed
    How is a hardtail boingy? It's rigid. I guess I'm confused
    Because there is no shock in the rear to absorb the impacts, the bike pushes back (boingy), making the rear harder to control. You can do some playing with tire pressures to compensate for this, but then you have higher rolling resistance, which sucks when you're trying to commute with it. Also, I'm sure it didn't help with the boing factor that it was a 29-er
    When I have my rear shock dialed in right, bumps in the road or on the trail are no problem. If the rear shock rebound is not adjusted right, though, (or if it is a crappy shock/frame design) then the rear shock can feel more boingy than a hard tail.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash.
    - Juli Furtado

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •