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  1. #1
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    replacing the stem on GT peace 9r

    Hi,
    I want to replace the stem on my GT peace 9r multi because its too low to my taste to one that can be adjusted.

    what i have now is: Easton EA30 and is something 31.8 mm I believe (picture attached)
    Amazon.com: Easton EA30 Road MTB Bike Stem Black 31.8 90mm Aluminum 6 Degree Rise: Sports & Outdoors
    Specifications:
    Diameter: 31.8mm
    Length: 90mm
    Rise: 6 Degrees
    Steerer Diameter: 1 1/8 inch

    what i want is like this: Eleven81 Quill Adjustable Road Bicycle Stem - 31.8mm, 0-60 Degree: Amazon.com: Sports & Outdoors

    or like this:
    Nashbar Adjustable Stem - Normal Shipping Ground

    or similar I just dont know if it will fit...

    please advise
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails replacing the stem on GT peace 9r-imag0015.jpg  


  2. #2
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    No. Just no.

    Adjustable stems are for 60 year olds that want to tool around the beach and parks, never going faster than 10kph. They creak, they flex, and they're ridiculous. Get a stem with a bit of rise if you feel it fits you better, but leave the adjustable crap to old people and lazy cruiser bikes.
    Stuff.

  3. #3
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    I don't quite quite agree on the old people comment because I know a few oldies that can rip. But I will also suggest getting a bar with more rise and possibly even a shorter stem. I hate the reached feeling too.

    Bryan_d
    Just keep pedaling, don't stop pedaling.

  4. #4
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    As obnoxious and unhelpful as dropmachine's response is, it is true that an adjustable stem will flex more than a standard one. If you're ripping downhills or hucking it slope-style, it's not a good choice. If you're riding bike paths and light XC trails, an adjustable stem would be fine.

    That Nashbar stem will work. Your current stem is 90mm long. If you go with an adjustable stem, and plan on raising the handlebars much, your hands will end up closer to you than before. If that's OK, go with the 95mm length. If you want your hands higher, but still the same distance from your body, go with the 110mm length.

  5. #5
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    Thanks guys its all helpful made me rethink it

  6. #6
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    A note on handlebar diameter.
    My 2008 GT had the same EA30 stem. It was however fitted with a set of plastic shims and the original handlebar was the non-OS 25.4 mm diameter.

    I can't tell from your picture but if you have the same setup and want to keep your handlebars it affects your choice of stem.

    Cheers
    /Johan

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by joe_bloe View Post
    As obnoxious and unhelpful as dropmachine's response is, it is true that an adjustable stem will flex more than a standard one. etc etc.
    Get a sense of humour captain underpants.

    And it was perfectly helpful. Adjustable stems always develop play. They eventually almost always creak. And once a person finds the ideal position, the rarely change it again. So why bother with a crappy creaky stem when a regular one will be lighter and do a better job?

    One thing you might think about is going to a shorter stem will raise you up, in case back pain is an issue. Also, you can pop on a set of Easton CNT DH bars, the old ones which have 2 inches of rise. The carbon will help damped vibrations, and the rise will push you up a bit.
    Stuff.

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