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  1. #1
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    Old Timberline rebuild?

    I've been in a dilemma about this. Its probably a '96 model and I had great times with it when I lived near mountains. Then I moved to Florida and haven't used it. Ten years have gone by and I recently found there are some decent areas not too far away. Time to get back into it. I'm mechanically inclined but inexperienced insofar as bicycles.

    Option 1 - replace it with a $150 target bike.
    Option 2 - strip it down and rebuild it.

    I'm just not sure how long this will take or if its even worth it. Time I have, money I don't.
    Just joined this board for this particular post. If key components are good, and I think they are, #1 is the way for me to try. Surely bearings, cables and such aren't that expensive. If there's interest, I'll figure out how to put up some pictures. I'll use search often, but there are bound to be questions.

  2. #2
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    I suggest to strip it down and rebuilt it piece by piece.
    clean every usable part,replace cables-chain-brake pads-grips and make it custom.It's fun and you can learn a lot about bikes,i know i did !
    check out what i've done with my 1996 outpost :
    I think this Outpost is finally done !

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by nick6sic6 View Post
    I suggest to strip it down and rebuilt it piece by piece.
    clean every usable part,replace cables-chain-brake pads-grips and make it custom.It's fun and you can learn a lot about bikes,i know i did !
    check out what i've done with my 1996 outpost
    Thanks for posting up, Nick; love what you did with the outpost. I won't be able to get into the timberline until next week. Reading through your thread gave me some inspiration to go ahead. I'm looking forward to it.

    I'll figure out how to post up some pictures before I hit the bike with the pressure washer & start to tear her down.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by redlad View Post
    Option 1 - replace it with a $150 target bike.
    Option 2 - strip it down and rebuild it.
    Posting in a GT forum will give you an almost 100% strike rate for Option #2

    I'm just not sure how long this will take or if its even worth it. Time I have, money I don't.
    Just joined this board for this particular post. If key components are good, and I think they are, #1 is the way for me to try. Surely bearings, cables and such aren't that expensive. If there's interest, I'll figure out how to put up some pictures. I'll use search often, but there are bound to be questions.
    So you have $150 to spend on your old bike Do as you say and give it the once over, strip it down, clean it up and see what needs fixing and what doesn't. Grab some degreaser, autosol and car polish and off you go. You will learn alot along the way.

    Me and my riding buddy just done the same for this unloved 93 Timberline with SS thrown in too..
    Before:


    After:



    Treat it as a fun project without the certain disappointment of a K-Mart box bike
    Old GT's are cool...........
    Last edited by Mr Crudley; 07-11-2012 at 03:03 AM.
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  5. #5
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    Nice !

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Crudley View Post
    Posting in a GT forum will give you an almost 100% strike rate for Option #2



    So you have $150 to spend on your old bike Do as you say and give it the once over, strip it down, clean it up and see what needs fixing and what doesn't. Grab some degreaser, autosol and car polish and off you go. You will learn alot along the way.

    Me and my riding buddy just done the same for this unloved 93 Timberline with SS thrown in too..

    Treat it as a fun project without the certain disappointment of a K-Mart box bike
    Old GT's are cool...........
    Beautiful work, Mr Crudley!

    Hoping it won't top near $150. I'd expect to get flamed for even posting #2, haha, but had to list out the logic.

    I'm getting a lot of inspiration from this forum. Trying to rig up some motorcycle stands to support the bike. That'll make the tear down much simpler and systematic.... can't imagine turning the bike upside down for this.

    Awesome job and thanks for posting Same color as mine, too. I've been through too much with this bike to let it go.

  7. #7
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    I got my brother a Timberline too. Same era as yours, but with the suspension fork (Timberline FS).

    He's been using it for daily commuting and even in snow storms and some winter off-road. The old chromoly GT frames are still making for a smooth ride

    Old Timberline rebuild?-imageuploadedbytapatalk1342324788.823618.jpg

    Old Timberline rebuild?-imageuploadedbytapatalk1342324876.757484.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by redlad View Post
    Beautiful work, Mr Crudley!

    Hoping it won't top near $150. I'd expect to get flamed for even posting #2, haha, but had to list out the logic.
    Thanks, you hopefully won't hit $150. If your bike hasn't been abused then a clean up will go a long way.
    We raided the spare parts bin and bought a handful of new bits to dress up the Timberline. The grips don't match, but, meh ... they will get darker and dirtier.
    I'm getting a lot of inspiration from this forum. Trying to rig up some motorcycle stands to support the bike. That'll make the tear down much simpler and systematic.... can't imagine turning the bike upside down for this.
    I have something like this which are great plus is small and compact.
    Saris Wheel Arch Rear Bike Stand > Accessories > Storage and Display Racks | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

    If you have an overhead beam handy then you can loop each end of the rope around the handlebar grips and the middle of the rope looped over the beam and around the seat and sling it all up. Use hangman's slip knots so you can adjust it and remove the slack so it will be suspended.
    Works a treat, cheap and easy to put away when you are done.

    Awesome job and thanks for posting Same color as mine, too. I've been through too much with this bike to let it go.
    Thanks Redlad & Nick6sic6,

    The Timberline is never going to be a Xizang or a Zaskar but is still a nice bike to ride. Fortunately it was in decent condition for its age and just needed some renovation and handful of new bits. The GT paintjobs make them worth keeping for that alone.

    The frame is sooo rigid compared to being spolit on a Dually or a higher grade steel frame.
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