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  1. #1
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    Making i-Drive 5.0 1 lighter?

    hey folks...just bought an '07 i-drive 5.0 1 w/ stock parts...

    i'd like to make it lighter. any advice? (this is my first mtn bike since 1989...kind of out of the loop on gear.)

    thanks...

  2. #2
    My gloves stink
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    Did you mean an I-Drive 5 1.0? If so, there is no easy, simple way to do it. It is well spec'd and the only way to make it any lighter is to spend a ton of money replacing lots of parts with the lightest alternatives you can find. Even then to shave more than a couple of lbs you'd probably end up spending more than you paid for the bike in the first place. My suggestion would be to enjoy the bike as it is. As a 5-inch travel AM bike, it's designed to be stout enough to be able to take some abuse.
    I dreamed I ate a 10 lb marshmallow. When I awoke, my pillow was gone.

  3. #3
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    thanks!

    thanks Appendage for your thoughts. yes, it's the i-Drive 5 1.0.

    sounds like i might have a really good deal on my hands as is (it's got low, low miles).

    what about getting carbon handlebars and seat post? will that drop the weight much. i've kind of been thinking that being under 30 lbs. would be good (everything i've read says it weighs just over 30).

  4. #4
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    OEProf, it just comes down to how important it is to you to shave off a few grams, and how much you're willing to spend to make that happen. There are starving childen in India who would love to eat your carbon fiber parts. To keep things in perspective, an extra Power Bar in your pocket will weigh more than you're going to save with the new post and bars. I doubt you'd notice it, but the carbon stuff will look cool. The most critical, perceivable weight is the rotating weight of your tires, so make sure you've got kevlar bead tires that are only as fat as you need. You can also go tubeless and save a few more grams if you want to deal with that whole deal. Since you got a good deal on that bike, don't worry, be happy.
    I dreamed I ate a 10 lb marshmallow. When I awoke, my pillow was gone.

  5. #5
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    wise words, Appendage. thank you.

  6. #6
    My gloves stink
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    A few more wise words...

    Quote Originally Posted by oeprof
    wise words, Appendage. thank you.
    Prof,

    Stop me, I just keep babbling. A bike is made light- or heavy- as a result of the aggregate of many decisions, not a just a few. It's like getting fat. You don't do it with one or two good meals. You do it with a little here, a little there, again and again, and before you know it, you're fat. It's the same with a bike, which is why making a bike light is the most expensive thing you can do to it. A light bike is the result of a few grams here, a few grams there, multiplied over and over again.

    The way I go about upgrading is to wait until something either breaks, wears out or proves itself unsuitable in some other way. Then I'll consider plunking down the extra money to save a little extra weight, since I've got to replace the part anyway. If you ride the bike a lot and keep it for a while, before you know it, you'll have replaced and upgraded a lot of stuff.

    Okay, I'll stop now.
    I dreamed I ate a 10 lb marshmallow. When I awoke, my pillow was gone.

  7. #7
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    Tyres and tubes would be the quickest, cheapest way to lose a chunk of weight.

    If it's got stock rubber they will be the 2.35 front and 2.1" Nevegals - not super heavy tyres in the scheme of things but there are lighter. The 2.35 is likely around 700g and the 2.1 around 650.

    Compared to the $$$ spent, carbon posts and bars won't shed a lot of weight really.
    My Cannondale Lefty keeps failing....

  8. #8
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    thanks...

    appendage and sideknob...

    thanks for the thoughts. good stuff. everything helps as i tend to overanalyze everything (i'm a professor)...one of my weaknesses.

    no sweat on the babbling, appendage. again, it's helpful!

  9. #9
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    You would probably loose a significant amount of weight if you replace your wheels with some Mavic Crossmax XL's. I've had mine for around 5 years and just now broke a spoke. I'm 200 lbs. and in no way a gentle rider. They are tubeless and are very light and well made. Of course they are pretty expensive. My Force 2.0 weighs around 32 lbs. and I thought about replacing some stuff to bring it under 30. Now that I've had the bike for 2 months and have gotten used to it, I won't change anything until it breaks. Learn to ride the bike as it is and adjust your riding to it. Save up some money for when stuff breaks. Great advice from the guys above my post.

    GT j

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