Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    8

    New question here. Help for a noob rebuilding 1990's GT Tequesta

    OK i will admit i know pretty much nothing about bikes. My husband bought a GT Tequesta All Terrain bike off a police auction about 3 years ago and it's been sitting in our shed ever since.

    it needs new brakes, a new seat, tires, etc.

    I would like to get it powdercoated and fixed up for him for Christmas, if possible. I know I need to chemically strip it first for that, what products would you recommend?

    My biggest issue is how to find the correct parts to replace the old ones with. Can you point me in the direction of a place that could help me do this? Or would I be better off handing it over to a bike shop to do?

    and finally, how much $ do you think a basic rebuild would be (no fancy parts, etc)

    yes i know i am crazy.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,047

    My take...

    Crazy? No way, everyone starts from somewhere. I just gave my new (old) '94 Tequesta a fresh white powdercoat. It's a skinny steel frame, not beefy aluminum. Take a look here:

    Old GT Tequesta - some questions...

    I bought Aircraft Remover (strange name eh?) paint stripper (in a can, and a plastic brush, a plastic scraper, and 3 sets of kitchen gloves) at the local Auto Zone. Works wonder but it does take some time and patience. Be extremely careful not to put it on your skin - it'll burn. I spent good 6 hours or so after I put my kids to bed while my wife was out of town for a few days. There is no way your hubby won't notice if you do it in your garage - guarantee. If that's too much for you, then find a local powdercoat guy (goolge it) and ask him to strip (bead brast) the frame then powdercoat it. I paid $90 for my frame & fork to be powdercoated, and it gave a new life to the frame. Stripping the paint should be another $50 or so. Removing old paint is a prerequisite for powdercoating, as baking process will bubble up old paint.

    Build – my suggestion is to shop around the local shops. Explain what you want to do and have them come up with quotes. The shop’s project will be to:
    1) Strip all parts without destroying them. You want to keep and use old parts as much as possible to save $.
    2) Select replacing components that have been dead or near dead. I bet you will need square taper bottom bracket (where crank arms rotate) and maybe wheel hubs will need replacement, or at least grease repack.
    3) Building up cost. This should include truning the wheels so it’s at least safe to ride. If it’s so old and spokes are in bad shape, then I can assure you the shop will recommend you to buy a new wheelset (under $150 for a set, front and rear). Since the bike is a canti brake (not disk), things should be less expensive. A new headset maybe needed, if the handlebar rotates with grinding feel. Replace all cables (shifters and brakes) as old ones can pop anytime (not a fun feeling). You probably also want to replace brake pads. I must warn you, that buying parts one by one can cause a lot of headaches (unless you like that kind of things). You can do the installation if you have right tools – but you would need special tools just to remove cranks, and bottom bracket just so you can strip the paint, for example.
    4) Complete new parts – if you need a fully new set of parts, look around the reasonable bikes on the floor and ask them to price the build kit "just like that." Be forewarned, that if you are to replace all parts, it could get up to a thousand or so, especially if you need a wheel set too. It costs more to buy new parts individually than to buy a complete bike off the shelf. If you have a friend that knows something about bike, asking them to help is probably the better way. I'm hawking craigslist for a month or so, finding good buys one by one - but you need to know what you are looking for...

    Now, if I were him (), then I would be extremely happy if you gave me a freshly powdercoated GT steel frame & a fork (ok, I'll take a ribbon on it too), and some allowances to build it up the way I want. A pretty frame is a fantastic present that motivates me to build it up to ride. By giving him an allowance, you will a) shift the burden from you on to him, and b) allow him to have some fun! If I were him, this would be the best present I could hope for. You don't want to hate the bike by going through what he ought to go through, right? Let him deal with it Good luck and I’m sure he’ll appreciate your kind thoughts, any way you give.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Cubensis's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    98
    First of all, the place you have it powdercoated will usually strip the frame for you which is included in the price. As far as parts and stuff go, do you possibly have a re-bicycle shop in your area? Sometimes they will help folks with little or no experience build up a bike with used parts they may have given to them. If you are wanting to do it yourself, I can point you in the right direction as far as what components you will need and where to get them. Does the frame fit him? How tall is he and what size frame? Are you wanting to single-speed it or geared? Are you wanting all new parts or just the ones that are wore out? To have it powdercoated you will have to strip all the parts off the bike including the cranks, bottom bracket, and headset cups....

    Hope some of this helps....

    Cliff
    "Friends Don’t Let Friends Get Friends Haircuts”

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    8

    update

    thanks so much for your help so far!

    OK i dug the bike out of the shed...i have my work cut out for me. I also have some pics.
    there was a number on the bottom "SY5L0924" and i thought the bike was a 26" frame, however, when i measure from top of seat tube to bottom bracket it is 25". The husband is 6ft3in tall, 32inch inseam.

    from the pics, can you tell which parts are totally trash? what about the forks? I totally did not remember them having suspension and now i don't know what to do about them. On the forks it says "SX Mach" and "Manitou Cartridge Answer."

    I think the pics will be here:
    Attached Images Attached Images
    • File Type: jpg 1.JPG (434.7 KB, 801 views)
    • File Type: jpg 2.JPG (402.5 KB, 535 views)
    • File Type: jpg 3.JPG (455.2 KB, 495 views)
    • File Type: jpg 4.JPG (418.0 KB, 570 views)

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Linoleum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    852
    Great project, I'm sure you're husband will be stoked once complete. I'd recommend not re-habbing those old suspension forks and find some rigid forks on eBay. [and have them powdercoated with the frame] I guess it really depends on the type of riding he'll be doing.

    Good luck!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,047
    Hey speedracer, I think:

    The handle bar needs to go. Grips look to be disintegrating. Get a cheap riser bar ($20) with Lock-On grips ($15). You may need to use a spacer between the stem as it looks narrow.

    Headset needs cleaning and repacking grease. It is a threadless headset so the bearing should be enclosed in the retainer ring. Take them apart, make sure to remember the order with which parts go in (hint - take a picture of all parts in install order).

    Bottom bracket can be serviced is you have right tools. Square taper BB lasts for long time so it maybe ok – rotate a crank to see if there is any rough rotation – if so, you may want to get a new square taper BB ($20 or so). It looks clean, so you may not even need servicing this part.

    Brake – if you can afford, replace these with the v brake type. Pull brake really sucks. While you are at it, redo all brake cables and housing (like $20 for a set of shifter cable & housing which is narrower, and brake cable and housing).

    You may want to move the water cage to other holes as the bottom looks to be on the frame.

    I would strongly suggest to repack the grease in the wheel hubs. You can keep riding if bearings and surfaces are still in a decent shape – no flaky bearing surfaces and no deep grooves in the tapered hub nut. You will need at least 2 cone wrenches (real flat skinny ones) to do that – measure the nut and buy the right wrench. Park Tool web site (www.parktool.com) always have good DIY info.

    It doesn’t look bad but so some servicing should give that bike a new life.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    8
    Thanks! I repacked the front wheel with new grease and bearings today. I need a different freewheel tool (hyperglide) so i couldn't remove it to service the rear bearings.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Linoleum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    852
    Any updates? I want to see some fresh paint/powder!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •