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  1. #1
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    Got a old GT tequesta....

    What's up everyone,
    I'm brand new here but it's really cool to see so many people into biking (especially here in San Diego). Anyways I decided to buy a used bike from cl to try out mountain biking so here it is!



    I was ecstatic to find out there was a complete forum section dedicated to this bike and I was hoping you guys could tell me what year it was from. I read somewhere on here that since it has a U brake it's from 1988 ish, but so far I haven't seen any tequestas in this color yet. All the brakes have shimano on them, and the shifting mechanism have the words m system, dualsis, and exage on them. The rims have CV-7 Araya on them too.
    I believe the bike is in fairly good shape (but I have no knowledge of mountain bikes at all) and it felt good when I rode it around and shifted the gears before I bought it. I'm sure I'm going to change out the grips on the handle bars and the seat since they're pretty worn out. I thought there was rust on the frame initially, but it looks like it's just paint rubbed off (would like to keep the original paint job though!). I also thought the chain looked rusty, but i guess it's just really dark with grease. Is there any problems I should be looking for that are common in a bike this old? I'm planning to take it to the North of the Border bike shop here in San Diego to have it inspected and tuned up, but it would be nice to know a little bit of what I needed before I went!
    Thanks again,
    Jake

  2. #2
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    It's a 1993 model year bike in Sapphire Blue....Here's the original catalog picture.

    And here's a link to the original spec sheet:
    http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...esta&Type=bike
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Needed: 26.8mm XTR seatpost, blue GT/Grundig Jersey.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the ID GM!

  4. #4
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    you might wanna check the rims. if this bike isnt heavily used there shouldnt be too much to worry about, but if its been used alot, and the rims are the originals, they might have a very worn, and therefor thin wall. other than that, if it shifts gears well, doesnt show miscolouring in the paint near welds, or look cracked it should be just fine and shouldnt need anything replaced.

    good luck with your new bike and hobby

  5. #5
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    Hhmmm I think it has been used alot (the seat and the handle bars are fairly worn out!) so I think changing the rims/tires is a must along with the seat (it's hard as heck) and the grips (metal showing with rust on the ends!). I also unfortunately got the wrong frame size (was going off the road bike estimates and it seems like I only have a half inch in the stand over test!) so I guess I'll have to take it easy and learn to control the bike very well first. Thanks again for all your guys' help!

  6. #6
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    Well, without knowing your height, inseam and the bike size, id still say that keep in mind that older generation mountainbikes didnt have as much stand over clearance as modern ones. It may still be the right size for you even if its tall. Older bikes dont generally have that sloping top tube of todays bikes, or at least not close to as much of an angle.

    Either way, taking it easy and learning control is never a bad thing. Hope it works out.

  7. #7
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    What's up again! I had another question for you guys. My bike had old shimano exgage drivetrain components (don't know how to tell the model number of the components though) and I was wondering if they were easily serviceable or if my local LBS will ask me if I want to replace them? They work fine (although I can't get the front deraileur to move to the biggest teeth although maybe it shouldn't because it's just a seven speed?) and it would be nice to just have them serviced instead of getting new stuff! I've read that to improve the shifting/braking I should try having the cables replaced first but I just want to know what you guys recommend. I have not brought the bike to the lbs yet but I want to be able to budget enough cash in my checking to cover the overhaul and any parts I'm going to buy (at this point I'll need a seat and handlebar covers for sure).
    And just out of interest are there still manufacturers that make a suspension fork that I can put on my GT? I've read from old posts that most people used to put rock shox judys on there but it looks like they don't make them anymore. I've seen those new toras and rebas but I think it might be a little too much (financially and usefulness wise) for light trail riding/commuting.

  8. #8
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    I thought you said the bike shifts well? Anywho. Regarding the shifters, they both have two small screws that dictates how much in and out they move at the most. You might have to adjust one of them on the front derailleur, if it wont move the chain onto the largest ring.

    Replacing wires isnt expensive so you might as well, and if you like me, suck at aligning derailleurs, its not expensive to have your LBS do this for you either. Servicing could be expensive and is easy to do yourself, you just need to clean the bike, bolt off some parts to expose the bearings and clean and regrease those as well. That could well be enough. If the bike still doesnt run smooth, you might have to replace them though, but grease is cheap so try that first. Also keep in mind that the LBS will only do what YOU tell them to do. If you only want a service they will only replace parts like bearings and wires etc, and you can always tell them what to replace if needed etc. Communication is a good thing!

    As for suspension forks. Plenty of major manufacturers make forks. Pace, Marzocchi, White Brothers, Manitou etc.. but i would recommend you not to get one for this bike, as it will upset the geometry of your bike. Its old enough to not have been designed with one in mind. A modern XC susp fork will rise the front of your bike significantly, and make it more slow and sluggish. Then again there are older forks that might work, which you can find used on ebay or such, but im not qualified to give any suggestions. Id keep the ridig fork.

  9. #9
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    Hey thanks for the advice again grimm! I really appreciate it. I guess I'll keep the fork and when I'm ready to move on I'll buy a new bike and keep this as a commuter bike. What I recently noticed as I tried to clean up the bike a bit (before bringing it to the lbs) was that the chainstays on the inside were pretty rusty! Is there a way to regain the original thickness of the chainstays after the rust is removed? Anyways thanks again for all the advice!

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