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  1. #1
    Slowly but surely...
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    Changing geometry on an older i-drive

    Hey all,
    So my rear SID blew up on my 2000 XCR1000 and while I'm in the market for a new shock I toyed with the idea of playing with the geometry a little. The default rear is 6.5" eye-to-eye with a 1.5" stroke. Has anyone played with different lengths/strokes with any success? What about swapping to a coil and what springs have you tried? I ride primarily XC and am willing to give up a little travel for a little quicker climbing.
    Thanks!
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash.
    - Juli Furtado

  2. #2
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    If you go with a shorter shock, it'll lower your BB and slacken your seattube and headtube, making it ride a lot worse. You center of gravity will be further back on the bike making it climb worse.

    I would run the proper length and stroke shock. Reducing travel isn't as simple as throwing a different shock on there. You'd be monkeying with geometry in a deleterious way.

  3. #3
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    Roger that. If anything for climbing you'd prefer a steeper head angle, but the old XCR's were great climbers outta the box so go with the correct shock and maybe look at your stem/bar combo if your looking to improve your climbing?
    I'm Ron Burgundy?

  4. #4
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    Thanks, picked up a new shock same stroke and length on ebay, but a bit newer with some improved features over that old SID. It'll be good to get the bike back together and on the trail. Thanks again for the feedback.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash.
    - Juli Furtado

  5. #5
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    Diddo on that, I tried going the opposite way. I tried a 4in. travel shock on my GT I -drive Team which is a little over 3 inch travel factory. I tried 4 in the front as well to match the rear and I couldn't get the bike to act right. The bike felt twitchy when steering and unresponsive when pedaling. I just couldn't get it dialed in. I returned the bike to it's 3 inches and the 80mm SID and it felt a whole lot better. I guess there's a great reason they fit those shocks to that type of geometry. You did good by sticking with the original numbers.
    2009 GT Marathon Team,GT Force 2.0, GT Jelly Belly TT (nude carbon), and a very special Todd Wells Zaskar.

  6. #6
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    I think going to a longer fork is OK as long as you're aware of what you're doing. Longer forks will slack out your head and seat angles. Sometimes that's good, if the bike is too twitchy or your center of gravity is too far forward. But if you like how the bike rides, it's a mistake to change it

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