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  1. #1
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    What maps/software are available for the Garmin Edge 605/705?

    Just purchased a Garmin Edge 705 and I am interested in what software/maps are available for use. I have noticed on the Garmin website that they sell TOPO maps in 24k, 100k, 24k national parks, etc. Are any of these maps worth buying? Are there other 3rd party maps out there that may be better? Do these maps show all the trails in a state? I mean, if I decided to go camping could I bring my Garmin along to see what trails are in the area to ride without needing to access software on a computer or anything like that? Thank you!

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    Here

    Try here for free topo maps: http://www.gpsfiledepot.com/
    Few trails are on maps so what you should do it download other people's rides from Motionbased and Garmin Connect and put them on your unit.

  3. #3
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    Following on from Mr Wolf's reply you can download gpx trails, edit them if necessary in Garmin Mapsource then copy them to your unit and choose to display them on the map at all times.

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    Maps are horrendously unreliable sources for bikeable trails. Some trails MIGHT be there, but many are very different from what is on the map, making the map useless. Some 'trails' might be roads and some roads might have become trails over the years. Many trails will not have GPS data on them. Remote or infrequently used trails may not have ANY data. Busy urban parks will probably have lots to choose from.

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    Check out garmin's site: http://connect.garmin.com/explore for other users' recorded activities. You can search by location, activity type, date, etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    Maps are horrendously unreliable sources for bikeable trails. Some trails MIGHT be there, but many are very different from what is on the map, making the map useless. Some 'trails' might be roads and some roads might have become trails over the years. Many trails will not have GPS data on them. Remote or infrequently used trails may not have ANY data. Busy urban parks will probably have lots to choose from.
    I guess I was looking more for state park trails... A lot of them dont seem to change very much (at least in AZ).

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    Quote Originally Posted by FireLikeIYA
    I guess I was looking more for state park trails... A lot of them dont seem to change very much (at least in AZ).
    You are still highly unlikely to find them on any topo. Park maps, sure. But especially if you want GPS data on them, you'll have to search other people's data at as many gps data websites out there like garmin connect, motionbased, mapmyride, geoladders, or whatever. If you get NG Topo!, there's a Topo! mapexchange where you can occasionally find data, too (not as good as the other sites, though). You might get lucky and find the GPS data for ALL state park/rec area/whatever trails in .shp format (use GPS Babel to convert) on your state's GIS data website (usually hosted by a state University or government agency). Depends on whether your state has/had the funding to send people out to record those trails with a gps themselves. But, don't count on finding that. I've lived in several states recently, and nobody has published that kind of data file yet (though I did find a .shp file of the Appalachian Trail on one).

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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    You are still highly unlikely to find them on any topo. Park maps, sure. But especially if you want GPS data on them, you'll have to search other people's data at as many gps data websites out there like garmin connect, motionbased, mapmyride, geoladders, or whatever. If you get NG Topo!, there's a Topo! mapexchange where you can occasionally find data, too (not as good as the other sites, though). You might get lucky and find the GPS data for ALL state park/rec area/whatever trails in .shp format (use GPS Babel to convert) on your state's GIS data website (usually hosted by a state University or government agency). Depends on whether your state has/had the funding to send people out to record those trails with a gps themselves. But, don't count on finding that. I've lived in several states recently, and nobody has published that kind of data file yet (though I did find a .shp file of the Appalachian Trail on one).
    So, would the national park topo maps have trails on them? Im just trying to understand why they would offer those topo maps seperately.

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    They're at a higher detail level 1:24k instead of 1:100k I think.

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    I prefer the topo maps from gpsfiledepot, more detailed than the normal garmin topo map.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wherewolf
    Try here for free topo maps: http://www.gpsfiledepot.com/
    Few trails are on maps so what you should do it download other people's rides from Motionbased and Garmin Connect and put them on your unit.
    Thank you!

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    Thank you for the replies. They have definitely got me started off on the right foot.

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    Also check out openstreetmap.org. There are some trails in those maps already, but the big advantage to OSM is that you can edit their maps, so you can add missing ones. Furthermore, for many of the trails you can then use bikeroutetoaster.com to plan rides (unfortunately some are either not connected correctly or have tags that aren't recognized by bikeroutetoaster). Coverage seems to be good for the parks in the San Francisco Bay Area. I don't know how it would be elsewhere.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wiedmann
    Also check out openstreetmap.org. There are some trails in those maps already, but the big advantage to OSM is that you can edit their maps, so you can add missing ones. Furthermore, for many of the trails you can then use bikeroutetoaster.com to plan rides (unfortunately some are either not connected correctly or have tags that aren't recognized by bikeroutetoaster). Coverage seems to be good for the parks in the San Francisco Bay Area. I don't know how it would be elsewhere.
    I see no way to upload those into a mapping gps.
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    The various ways to get them onto Garmins are documented at http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/OSM_Map_On_Garmin

    The premade option is the simplest, although I'm not sure there are premade ones with contour lines. I downloaded a California map from cloudmade.com and it did load on MapSource (my 705 is still on its way). It has routable trails, but no contour lines.

    There is no DEM data in the converted maps, unfortunately, but I'm hoping that's not critical since the routes created by bikeroutetoaster do have elevation in them.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by wiedmann
    The various ways to get them onto Garmins are documented at http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/OSM_Map_On_Garmin

    The premade option is the simplest, although I'm not sure there are premade ones with contour lines. I downloaded a California map from cloudmade.com and it did load on MapSource (my 705 is still on its way). It has routable trails, but no contour lines.

    There is no DEM data in the converted maps, unfortunately, but I'm hoping that's not critical since the routes created by bikeroutetoaster do have elevation in them.
    Thanks, I did not spend enough time looking at it.

    I have found though that the free CA 20' contour topo (link) and Ibycus street maps (link) have me covered very well!
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireLikeIYA
    So, would the national park topo maps have trails on them? Im just trying to understand why they would offer those topo maps seperately.
    Maybe some, but don't count on it. Most stuff is digitized from USGS topos, and some is done from aerial imagery. Trails are small enough that they can just disappear from an aerial photo into the forest. It's also hard to distinguish a legit trail from a cow path in many cases. As such, few trails end up on any commercial mapping packages at all. You really need to consult local sources for trail information, as they will have the most recent info and they will probably be the ones to map the trails in their area.

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