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  1. #1
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    What can I do with a GPS?

    Thinking of buying one but not sure how to get the best out of it.
    What can they do?
    My other fork is a ''righty"

  2. #2
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    The GPS itself doesn't do much. It records position. From there, it can calculate your speed, distance you've traveled, time required. Analysis comes after you transfer the recorded files to your computer.

    Extra sensors give you more information. Barometric altimeter determines your elevation. An electronic compass helps with navigation. ANT+ and Bluetooth transmission protocols let you connect additional sensors and devices like heart rate monitors, speed/cadence sensors, power meters, temperature sensors, smartphones, computers, etc.

    With additional analysis on your computer, you can track and plan your fitness progress. With connectivity to a smartphone, you can take advantage of the data connection (if it's available) to live track, or to get weather updates, or upload your activity immediately after you finish. If you are serious enough about your fitness to buy a power meter, it would be worthwhile to hire a coach to handle the analysis of the data from that power meter. It's easy to get buried in data when you're not trained how to use it.

    I use a GPS for a few of things. I map trails. It's the biggest thing I do with the local club. It's a big project. Knowing what's out there helps us with new trail development and with maintaining what we have. I also use a GPS to help find my way in unfamiliar places. I also keep track of my annual mileage totals.

  3. #3
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    Finding my way would be good for seeking out new places and mapping rides.
    I am from NZ and would like to explore without risk of getting lost.
    Any suggestions?
    My other fork is a ''righty"

  4. #4
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    No matter what you use, you will always have a risk of getting lost. A GPS won't help you at all if you can't read a map and translate what you see on the screen to what is in the hills and forests surrounding you. Batteries die, electronics get wet and stop working (even if they're supposed to be waterpoof), they bounce off a rock and smash, the list goes on.

    With that said, if you want navigational assistance, you're better off choosing a model that will display topographical maps. Some cycling and all running GPSes aren't really meant for navigation at all - simply data recording, and therefore don't have map displays of any kind.

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