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  1. #1
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    Vista HCx and route-making newb ?

    Hi,

    I've been using my Vista HCx (thanks Jay) in a very limited way but now I want to make a route. For example, I want to ride a 12-mile loop with people that know these trails, I don't so I just want to record the loop so I can go back there and ride alone if I can't find anyone else.
    In the user's guide it says go to routes > new and choose a name for the route if you want. My question is...Is there a start and stop for the route that I'm missing? Do I have to hit mark a waypoint every so often or just at a significant spot?

    Thanks.
    Lou.
    04 Stumpjumper FSR Pro
    Airborne Ti HT
    Trek Rigid SS - No suspension, no gears....no problem

  2. #2
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    I also ride a Stumpjumper with an HCx so I'll chime in. I may have missed your primary point, but I wonder if you want to make a 'Track' instead of a 'Route'.

    From my quick read of your post, you are seeking to record stepwise position loci which define a traversed path. My limited experience with the Garmin software suggests that a 'Route' is a sparse distribution of such points, whereas a 'Track' is a collection of such points recorded at a much higher spatial frequency in order to approximate a continuum. I wonder, have you tried recording a Track yet?

  3. #3
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    I just got a vista hcx also. So there may be a better way than what I suggest. All you need to do is turn the unit on when you get to the starting point. I set my starting point as a way point (I don't know it this is necessary). Once you begin riding the unit will record your track. Turn the unit off when you get back to your car then when you get home download the track to motionbased so you can evaluate it. You can then put the track on your unit for future use. You can also download other peoples tracks to ride yourself. I have only had the unit 1 week so maybe someone with more experience could tell us an even easier way. So far it's a really cool toy!
    John
    A poor man can only afford the best.

  4. #4
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    Didn't even know the difference between a route and a track.
    Think that's the way I'll start out Murphy.
    Lou.
    04 Stumpjumper FSR Pro
    Airborne Ti HT
    Trek Rigid SS - No suspension, no gears....no problem

  5. #5
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    Routes or tracks can be useful, but they tend to be useful in different situations. For a spidery network, a track may be more useful. In a more open trail system with fewer intersections, a route might do the trick better. Usually, you create a route on your computer first that you load into your GPS. You record a track of your progress as you go to record ride statistics, map the trails, and to backtrack if you need to.

    If it's a system you ride often, you can do both. Use old ride data you can condense into a route, but record a track as you ride to compare ride stats.

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