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Thread: Trimble Juno ST

  1. #1
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    Trimble Juno ST

    I'm taking a field/mobile GIS course for my master's degree and we were all issued one of these little babies for the term. All I can say is...wow. This is going to be my next GPS receiver unless Garmin (or someone else) can match this.

    Here's a web linkie in case you've never heard of it.
    http://www.trimble.com/junost.shtml

    They don't give you a price for these things, but I was informed that they run $600-$700. For all of you who have dropped coin on an Edge 705, this is really not all that much more expensive.

    It has integrated bluetooth, wifi, and gps, with an external antenna port on top of it and an SD card slot. That lets you connect to the web for e-mail before/after your field session. It can communicate with bluetooth devices...most importantly bluetooth-enabled cameras for embedding GPS coords into pictures.

    It comes with a suite of trimble's own software that lets you do quite a bit, including transferring map data onto the receiver from the computer so you can view the data you're collecting overlaid on top of whatever vector or raster data you want. It can also handle routing if you use it with a program that's compatible. I know MS Streets & Trips is compatible, but not sure about others. I also think that with routing, you have to plan your trip on your pc beforehand and then load it onto the GPS so the GPS can tell you when to make turns. On the positive side, you can pull up google maps, too.

    It's even a fully functional Windows Mobile PDA where you can sync contacts and calendars with your PC. It even comes with pocket word, pocket powerpoint, and pocket excel for handling office programs.

    This receiver is also MUCH smaller than my Garmin 76 CSx...MUCH.

    The only drawbacks are that it's really not ruggedized (only slightly moreso than the average PDA) and that it's on a slower processor and an older version of windows mobile.

    The cost does make it really affordable for trailwork crews on a budget, though.

  2. #2
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    Pretty sweet.

  3. #3
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    Raster basemap support? GeoExif support? Bluetooth? Wow, nice! That is damn nifty for sure. Not much of a fan of windows mobile though, though at the same time I can understand why they would go with it as an OS....

    Completely unresearched, but I wonder how close you can get to this with using a regular old WM5 smartphone with a nice sensitive bluetooth gps reciever and using something like oziexplorers or fugawis "compact edition" mapping softwares?

    Still, very cool stuff.
    Crankfire.com / New Englandish Mountain Biking Community

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan Cloud
    Raster basemap support? GeoExif support? Bluetooth? Wow, nice! That is damn nifty for sure. Not much of a fan of windows mobile though, though at the same time I can understand why they would go with it as an OS....

    Completely unresearched, but I wonder how close you can get to this with using a regular old WM5 smartphone with a nice sensitive bluetooth gps reciever and using something like oziexplorers or fugawis "compact edition" mapping softwares?

    Still, very cool stuff.
    You could probably get pretty close to it. The one thing you'll miss out on, though, is Trimble's proprietary data format, which saves ALL position information (all the points that get averaged together to generate a waypoint or vertex) so you can do some post-processing on it to get even better than the stated 2-5m resolution.

    Still, some of the software that is on this thing is free from Trimble, so you can go to the link I posted previously and check out their free programs. You can definitely expand the functionality of any smartphone or PDA to get close to what this thing can offer you.

    ArcPad as a software package (which is where a lot of this unit's really cool functionality really shines) is something you can put on any GPS-enabled smartphone/PDA (at least via a bluetooth GPS receiver if it doesn't have an integrated one like the Juno). Say, for example, you wanted a more rugged version of this. You could get a rugged smartphone (there are a number available on the market from motorola) and install ArcPad onto it. Granted, you'd end up spending more money to go this route, but you can do it, and lots of people do for business/industry solutions.

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