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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gundam168 View Post
    I can play my dying elk ringtone on my smartphone and leave it on a tree to distract the bear chasing me.
    Lol. I'm not saying in any way that a phone can't get the job done. But as someone else said, if you have the money, a gps is the way to go. But ultimately if a phone used as a gps does what you want, then go for it.
    Will someday be living in Alaska with 2 pooches

  2. #27
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    Lately I've been using my Samsung Epic paired to a GPS Bluetooth logger/receiver (Qstarz BT-Q1000XT) with Endomondo. It is much more accurate than the the GPS on the phone. It is able to lock on more satellites and update faster. A plus side of that, my Endomondo readings are longer in distance like they should be. Plus, if my phone fails or runs out of battery, I can still pull the log from the GPS unit and upload it manually. The only function that doesn't work is the auto pause in Endomondo which sucked anyways, so I just use a external headset button to pause it if needed.

  3. #28
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    I wound up getting an Oregon 450. Thanks for all the help guys.

    edit: $199 US

  4. #29
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    DCRAINMAKER Reviews

    2011-sport-device-gps-accuracy-in-depth.html
    2011-sport-device-gps-accuracy-in-depth_09.html

    Here is a very in depth review of some of the popular running watches vs the iPhone4. The Garmin Edge 800 is in there as well.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlazedHam View Post
    I wound up getting an Oregon 450. Thanks for all the help guys.

    edit: $199 US
    Where did you find that deal?

  6. #31
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    As far as I know dedicated GPS units cant show more than 1 trail at a time or if they doits overly complicated to prepare.A file like this would render an error in GPS devices or "printed" on screen very weird:

    (its a GPX with most available MTB tracks at a given area)

    Real GPS verses Phone GPS-screen-shot-2013-02-07-12.21.37.jpg


    Of course you cant navigate trought a file like that but I think the advantages of having it printed on GPS screen are obvious, more so if you are unfamiliar with the area.
    Until recently all available software I knew had the same problems, but the maker of Trekbuddy (Kruch), a FREE java GPS custom map aplication that works on any phone (except iphone and windows mobile I think) was so kind as to introduce a new feature I havent seen anywhere else allowing to plot as an overlay a file with multiple tracks. If you're exploring an unknown area you can "print" on screen multiple alternative paths to the "printed" route and decide on the field wich ones to take.
    Its still in beta version but workable, current version (1.6) doesnt have that feature but next ones will:

    TrekBuddy - Outdoor companion

    The phone real handicap for me was battery life, that was until I purchased an external 7k mA USB portable charger/battery that is about the same size as the phone.

  7. #32
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    Re: Real GPS verses Phone GPS

    Quote Originally Posted by Gundam168 View Post
    I can play my dying elk ringtone on my smartphone and leave it on a tree to distract the bear chasing me.
    Muwahahaha..
    Now seeking Honey Badger ringtone.

    Already carry so much in my pack that it entertains people. Use an Android phone GPS with MyTracks, and get very good results with by running it in Airplane Mode.

    Doing this saves battery life, good all day, eliminates cell tower triangulation, unwelcome calls, and it works reliably under heavy tree cover.

    Try this ^ before you give up & buy another item to stuff in your pack. And yeah, I crash far too often to mount anything on the bike..
    The best is the one you want to ride most often..

  8. #33
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    Actually most high end smartphones these days come with a ton of sensors that record Strava data comparably to a Garmin (or similar). The phones use a combination of Wifi, cell towers, GPS, accelerometer, gyroscope, barometer, and compass to gather data for Strava ride recording. I'd considered running a standalone GPS instead of my phone but the only benefit I see is longer battery life and current speed readings. Using a RokForm case/bike mount, I just put my phone on my steer tube and I'm off!

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by n64kps View Post
    Actually most high end smartphones these days come with a ton of sensors that record Strava data comparably to a Garmin (or similar). The phones use a combination of Wifi, cell towers, GPS, accelerometer, gyroscope, barometer, and compass to gather data for Strava ride recording. I'd considered running a standalone GPS instead of my phone but the only benefit I see is longer battery life and current speed readings. Using a RokForm case/bike mount, I just put my phone on my steer tube and I'm off!
    you're a little mistaken there. GPS apps use the GPS antenna. I dunno if you've ever used wifi-only location finding but it usually can't even put you on the correct side of the street. while the phone can do it and apps will use that location if there's nothing better, if you have a gps signal, it's not useful. cell towers are only used to download ephemeris (tells the GPS which satellites to look for) which speeds signal lock. your phone cannot determine its location with cell towers alone, hence the Assisted in AGPS. the accelerometer is not used with GPS apps. neither is the gyro. the compass is not used for data recording, either.

  10. #35
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    what do you think about the suunto quest with gps pod?

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishbum View Post
    Not exactly - the GPS does not derive a position from the cel tower. What you are experiencing is multipath reception where the GPS signals bounce all around the building surfaces and the GPS has a hard time differentiating between the real (direct) signal and the same signal arriving later because it is being reflected by all those large surfaces. A good GPS has a multipath algorithm that can choose the real signal and reject the delayed signal.

    Remember, the fundamental principle that GPS works on is speed of light to determine distances, so if the GPS picks the wrong signal (delayed) to use for the solution then the position can be way off...
    That is incorrect for the question that is being asked. On android, Google maps for example, if the GPS signal is lost, the cell tower based location will be passed to the application. This happens automatically and will make your application look like you just jumped from where you are to right under the cell tower.

    This can be disabled but it will then continue to harass you to reactivate it. The application is not getting a confused GPS position, its getting a cell tower position automatically when GPS position is lost.

    When I use endomondo I must turn this off or it won't even begin to track right. At least that is how endomondo worked a year ago.
    2012 Fianceť
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    2009 Spc RH Exprt Disc 29
    2008 Trek Fuel EX7
    2007 Spc RH

  12. #37
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    I used the Strava app on my Droid (on the Palm Canyon Epic) while my buddy used his Garmin Edge 800. The distances measured by each device were within a mile (25 mile ride). The elevation gained were waaaaaaaaaay different (a couple thousand feet). Since the phone has no accurate way to measure altitude (Garmin uses a barometric sensor) I am pretty sure the 800 reading was more accurate.

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